Latest Posts

My kayak paddling and fishing therapy

By John Fabina

 

I had an unfortunate accident this spring that resulted in my hand being crushed. After surgery and pins, my hand is expected to make a full recovery.
Physical therapy was challenging but necessary to return my hand to normal. After a month or so I was able to begin kayaking again in my Wavewalk. The therapist was impressed at my improvement. I explained how paddling seemed to improve my hand strength and dexterity. My surgeon confirmed that it was perfect therapy for many reasons, the most important was that it was an activity I enjoyed.
As time went on , later this summer I was able to fish again. Back to exploring new waters, this time a remote lake in Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I found a few bucketmouths and pike. It was great to be fishing and exploring in my Wavewalk again!

John

 

 

More fishing, paddling, and wildlife photography with John »

Wavewalk sailing multi-boat

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Wavewalk Adventures of Key Largo

A year ago today, Hurricane Irma blew through. Today, my wife and I took the Wavewalk fleet out to snorkel the wrecks of Garden Cove under a rather cloudy sky. Still, it was a wonderful peaceful day. Hopefully, the video will show so.

This sail rig works quite well if you have no place to go fast.

The electric motor used 15% of 915 watts = 137 watts. At 15 cents a KW/Hr…

… there goes my 2 cents.

More fishing, motorizing, touring and diving adventures with Larry »

 

 

Big wake coming? No big deal – Wakes are fun!

This movie illustrates the concept of Wake-Immunity, which is part of the broader concept of Super-Stability.

A Wavewalk S4 motor kayak skiff is going in choppy water, in the ocean. This portable boat is so stable and its driver so much in control that a series of big lateral waves from the wake of a fast motorboat passing nearby at full speed does not present a problem or even a challenge to the S4 driver – It is just a new opportunity to have some wake fun in the sun…

 

Wave walking around the neighborhood

Just a short video shot while driving my S4 around the corner…

 

Couple observations –
This 6 HP outboard is no 10 HP, and this 8″ pitch prop is no 9″ pitch 😀
Driving this little boat in the chop is super easy and fun, whether it’s against the wind, in lateral waves, or in a following sea.

Wide wheels for Wavewalk S4 motor kayak skiff

I live close to the water, and I need to transport my motorized Wavewalk S4 over mildly rough terrain, and a sandy beach. The outboard motor I use is a 6 HP Tohatsu that weighs close to 60 lbs, so carrying it by hand is not easy.
Therefore, I had to make a trolley that features wheels that are bother high and wide. The trolley also needed to be transported on board the S4 without taking too much space.

I made a simple wheel cart from a pair of 13″ high and 6.5″ wide flat-free (non inflatable) wheels, and 3/4″ stainless steel tube mounted on a 1/2″ thick plywood board. This structure is attached to the S4 by means of straps.
The plywood board features a small wooden extension in its center. This extension fits in the first, widest slot in the S4’s front deck, and it allows to easily attach the wheel cart vertically, by means of a single shock cord (bungee).

Launching with this trolley is easy, and so is getting the wheels under the kayak after beaching.

 

The plywood is coated with two layers of urethane that protect it from the water.

 

Pulling is done either by holding one of the two molded-in front carry handles, or a strap attached to them.

 

Since these wheels are, big, another thing that this wheel cart offers is to run the outboard motor in a bin filled with freshwater, in order to rinse the salt out of it. This way, the motor can stay attached to the boat, and be clean of the salt.

This setup is enough to let the motor run in freshwater for a few minutes

I guess some readers may ask if this wheel cart offers the front passenger some protection from spray when the S4 moves in waves, and the answer is that it does offer a little protection compared to having nothing there.