Wavewalk S4 transported on pickup truck bed with T extension

The following pictures shows how effective is a T extension for a pickup truck bed.

Wavewalk S4 transported on a pickup truck bed with T extension

Photo: Larry Jarboe

10 Comments

  1. fish

    This thing not very heavy, and it’s mounted on the trailer hitch in no time.
    Don’t forget to attach a red cloth at the end of the kayak!

  2. PackerYaker

    Hey Larry…….do you feel the extension is necessary with the S4? I would think that the 8 feet or so available on most beds with tailgate down should be adequate as long as the W is strapped securely in place. That’s how I transport my 500, and have seen the 700 also transported that way.

  3. Bassman

    Gary,

    I don’t have a gate (reduced wind resistance) on the 8′ bed of my 1988 Chevy crew cab and I make boxed S4 deliveries into Miami or Key West without an extension. If I was running a short bed (6′) with no gate, I would invest in an extension. A short bed with the gate dropped will work fine till the salt air rusts through the wire cables or brackets that the tail gate hangs from.

    Regardless, it is a good idea to load the S4 stern first onto the pick-up bed. And, use serious ratchet straps that you check often during your journey.

    You are most welcome to come down to Key Largo to try out loading an S4 on your rig. Presently, I have 3 demo rigs that I am decking out for guide service to accommodate up to 6 people. We can also compare motor combinations to suit most any budget.

    Have a wonderful Wavewalk weekend.

    Larry J.

  4. fish

    Gary,

    I agree with Larry.
    An extension reduces the risk of the rear part of the boat starting to sway sideways, and it also reduces vibrations.
    Using an extension also reduces the need to apply excessive force when tightening the straps.

    My 2 cents

    Yoav

  5. Bassman

    That is a most valuable 2 cents.

    Also, the S4 pivots nicely on the kayak support extension for launching and retrieving your vessel.

    But, do not park so it extends out into the street.

    Larry J.

  6. PackerYaker

    Thanks guys…….one of these days, I’d like to drive down your way, Larry. I’ll definitely stop by if I do.

    I was wondering if you had any experience with the Torqeedo motor. Looks like it combines some of the advantages of both electric and gas motors. I’d check into them further if not for the fact that they’d have to be shipped to Miami for any maintenance / repair needs. Some of the reviews indicate that frequency of repairs is a concern. I sure like the idea, however, of a quiet 30 lb electric motor that reportedly can perform like the 2.3 Honda. I know you’re more into bigger and faster gas powered motors, but just wondering if you have any experience with them.

  7. fish

    Gary,

    No experience with these motors, but the hard facts of physics are that 1 KW = 1.34 HP.
    If you see that an electric motor is graded 3 KW, you can believe that it is as powerful as a 2.3 HP gas engine.
    Until then, what you read is the product of marketing specialists and not engineers, and it may not necessarily be relevant for you as a user of such motors.

    This said, 2.3 HP is good enough for your W500, and it could be enough for an S4 too, if you’re not planning to go over 9 mph, which seems to be the ultimate speed that these ultralight motors are capable of reaching.
    BTW, the 20″ long shaft Honda 2.3 weighs 29 lbs.

    Yoav

  8. Bassman

    Gary,

    The 4 kw Torqeedo should be equivalent to a 3.5-5 hp Tohatsu/Nissan/Mercury outboard. With the proper lithium battery pack to ensure a 20 mile range, $15,000.00 is a price you might expect to pay.

    I provide my Wavewalk customers with personally refurbished 3.5 hp Tohatsu/Nissan/Mercury lightweight (35 lb.) long shaft outboards for $400 or 5 hp (45) lb. long shaft outboards for $600 that will make that same 20 mile run on about a gallon of gasoline (non-ethanol infected, please).

    Is the $14,000+ price difference worth going to high torque/hp electric?

    Larry J.

  9. fish

    One of the products offered by that electric motor company is an electric motor that they compare to a 5 HP and even 6 HP petrol (gasoline) outboard motors.
    Their specification sheet for this motor says (Quote): “Input power in watts 2,000, Propulsive power in watts 1,120”

    Unlike internal combustion (gas) motors, which take some time to deliver their full power, electric motors react instantly to the driver’s demand to increase RPM. However, this advantage, which can be critical in racing, has little meaning in everyday motorizing.

    Remember the law: 1 KW = 1.34 HP , and 1 HP = 0.74 KW

  10. PackerYaker

    Thanks guys…….your input is really helpful.

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