Tag Archive: kayak paddling

The world’s fastest kayak

What is the world’s fastest kayak?

The world’s fastest kayak is the Wavewalk S4, propelled by a 9.8 HP Tohatsu outboard motor. The S4 can go at a 17 mph speed (27 kmh) when propelled by a 9.8 HP motor, with only the driver on board.

What is the world’s speed record for kayaks?

The current kayak speed record is 17 mph (27 kmh). This speed record was achieved by Captain Larry Jarboe, in Key Largo, on January 17th, 2018, in a Wavewalk S4 outfitted with a 9.8 HP outboard motor.

What makes a kayak faster?

The factors that contribute to a kayak’s speed are its Size, Weight, Dimensions, and Propulsion.
Human Powered: In a paddling or pedaling mode on flat water, mono-hull kayaks with a high Length to Beam (L/B) ratio, namely very long and narrow kayaks, are generally faster than kayaks with a low L/B, which are more stable.
In choppy water, the kayak’s Stability and Balancing capabilities offered to its crew play a more important role.
Motorized: At high speeds, such as when the kayak is motorized by a powerful outboard motor, Stability and Balancing capabilities are the dominant speed factors, as the kayak moves in a planing mode and no longer in a displacement mode – The stabler the kayak, the easier and safer it is for its driver to drive it at high speed.
Additionally, kayaks that offer their driver to drive while seated closer to the motor are safer and easier to drive than kayaks that have the driver separated from the outboard motor by a longer distance.

Why is stability a key factor for speed?

Stability is defined as resistance to change. A kayak driven at high speed can flip over more easily than at a lower speed, and better lateral stability means that it can be driven at higher speeds with a lesser risk of overturning.

What is the most stable kayak?

The world’s most stable kayak is the Wavewalk S4. It is the only kayak that enables a 200 lbs full-size adult to stand on one side of the kayak with both feet, and turn around themselves as if they stood on the deck of a full-size boat. It is also the only kayak that can be driven at high speed in rough water, namely the most seaworthy kayak.
This unmatched stability results from the fact that the S4 features a patented twin hull. In this full fledged, true catamaran form, the boat’s volume is distributed along its left and right sides, where it is the most effective in offering maximum buoyancy and therefore best support for the shifting weight of both passengers and gear. This optimal performance is in contrast to other kayaks that feature conventional mono-hulls, where the hull’s volume is concentrated along the boat’s center line in a way that makes it the least effective in stability terms.

Why is balancing capability a key factor for kayak speed?

Being a small vessel, a kayak is inherently less stable than bigger boats, and therefore the ability of the kayak’s user(s) to balance themselves and their kayak effectively is key factor in the kayak’s overall stability.
Balancing capability is a key ergonomic factor for driving many types of small vehicles, both human powered and motorized.
It is particularly important in bicycles and motorcycles that offer no stability of their own, and therefore depend entirely on their users’ ability to balance them. Other vehicles that offer their users good balancing capabilities are All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV), snowmobiles, and Personal Watercraft (PWC).

What gives a kayak user better balancing capabilities?

A type of seat known as a Saddle is what all the above listed vehicles have in common. A saddle allows the user to balance themselves with their legs straddling the seat, in a manner similar to horse riding. The user straddling the saddle seat can easily and swiftly shift their weight from one leg to another, in a way that resembles balancing while running and jumping, namely more naturally, intuitively, and effectively than when seated in other positions, such as on a bench, swivel seat, chair, or in the notoriously uncomfortable and unstable L kayaking position.

What makes the Wavewalk S4 faster than other kayaks?

The Wavewalk S4 is the world’s fastest motorized kayak due to the fact that it is the world’s most stable kayak. This urivaled stability is made possible thanks to its twin-hull (catamaran hulls) and the ability of its crew to balance themselves effectively while riding a saddle seat, similarly to the way that Personal Watercraft (PWC) and other high performance vehicles (e.g. motorcycles, ATVs, snowmobiles) balance themselves and their vehicles.

The world’s fastest kayak in action (movies) –

The world speed record for vessels designated as kayaks:

Captain Larry Jarboe driving his S4 at 17 mph

 

High speed motor kayak in the ocean chop:

 

Speed comparison of S4 powered by a 5 HP vs 9.8 HP:

 

What are the advantages of a fast kayak?

The main advantages of a faster kayak is that it saves you time when you want to get somewhere, such as a productive fishery, and it makes it possible for you to access remote locations.
In addition, speed is enjoyable, and driving a fast kayak is fun.

Practically speaking, a fast and stable kayak that’s also highly seaworthy presents the advantages of a microskiff (micro skiff), in addition to being a car-top boat, and the ability to carry it to and from the beach, without depending on boat ramps.

 

4 lbs large mouth bass with lots of salad

By Robbie Cairl

Here is an interesting photo from this summer. My friend was panicking because I said I am releasing the fish if he takes a picture or not. He somehow had it in panoramic mode which caused the odd double exposure. A nice 4 lb large mouth with a huge side of salad as you can see!

I got a small, 30 lb thrust electric trolling motor and crudely attached it to my W500. I only used it twice and now wish I had gotten a slightly more powerful motor. It really didn’t do the job against a steady Connecticut River current, I will guess 2 knots. However it handles great and pushes me about twice as fast as my friends paddling their yaks.

Now the new S4 video is amazing! Some day I will bite the bullet and get a gas powered motor. My friend has a 2 horse on his jon boat, and not only does it fly it is so quiet you needn’t raise your voice to converse while running full speed. I still want the exercise I get from paddling though so the motor is just for getting me longer distances.

My oldest granddaughter will be 3 this summer and I am dying to get her on the water!

 


More kayak fishing in New England with Robbie »

Veterans’ monthly kayak outing on the water

By Dave Hernandez

St Augustine Paddle Sports

Every month for the past 5 years I have lead Honoring The Brave, which is a non profit program. We arrange a paddle day for Veterans and First Responders to enjoy the day on water with their family and friends.

Recently I introduced Wavewalk vessels to the outing and it has made the day that more enjoyable. Whether they are fishing from them or just paddling around, I get asked can they go out again or can’t wait until next event.
By next event I will have a motorized S4 to take a few out so I can raise the excitement level higher 🙂

 

   


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Bob and Austin’s fishing adventure in the mangrove tunnels of Key Largo

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Wavewalk Adventures Key Largo

Bob and his grandson Austin had a great adventure yesterday.
Austin caught a nice mangrove snapper.

 

 


 

More diving, fishing and outfitting with Captain Larry »

A paddle for going in narrow mangrove tunnels

This is a special multitasking paddle that Captain Larry Jarboe of Wavewalk Adventures Key Largo created following a conversation that we had a few weeks ago.
The conversation was about advancing in extremely narrow and low mangrove tunnels. By narrow we mean barely a couple inches wider than the S4, and by low we mean with branches going across the mangrove tunnel at a height that sometimes forces the paddler to lay on their back and push the branch upward in order to allow the kayak to slide forward. This may involve turning around and lifting the branch over the motor too.
Paddling is just part of what the paddle has to do, and pushing branches is not less important. In this mode of advancement through a tortuous tunnel of dense vegetation, the ability to grab branches in order to pull the kayak sideways and/or forward is a real necessity.
A regular kayak paddle is much too long for this confined space, and a single-blade canoe paddle works only on one side, and since space is so restricted it’s not always easy to switch sides. In fact, sometimes it can be very hard.

Larry’s multitasking paddle is just a little over 4 ft long, and he made it by combining two canoe paddles, and cutting the blades according to these special challenges.

This is Larry’s first prototype, and he’s likely to keep coming up with new versions.

BTW, a trip in the mangrove tunnels is an adventure that’s impossible to forget!

 


More diving, fishing and outfitting with Captain Larry »