Tag Archive: wind

One of those days – No fish caught, just a great paddling stroll

By Jill Toler

I am an early riser each day due to work so generally I wake up early on the weekends as well. This morning I actually slept in until 6:00 am, which put me a little behind in my “dawn patrol” plans. In my younger days, a few of my friends and I would hit the beach as the sun was coming up for a little dawn patrol surfing and boogie boarding. Last night I made a plan to do a bit of dawn patrolling in the W before church.

Loaded up about 6:30 am and headed to a new place for launching and fishing. I was on the water before 7:00 am; which was later than I intended, and throwing a popper in a very fishy looking area. I fished and paddled for two hours and never caught a fish. I know, I was shocked too. I did not expect to get skunked in that area but, I suppose it happens.

The area is Northwest Creek around Fairfield Harbour, NC. There are a lot of waterfront houses with docks and great cover in between the docks; reed grass, stumps, trees with overhanging branches, etc. I was at a loss since I didn’t even catch a sunfish. I paddled to the other side of the creek to try over there. The wind had shifted overnight and was blowing right down the creek and it was a bit difficult to stay in position. Still, nothing. I decided that it was just going to be “one of those days”. I paddled around to do a bit of sight seeing, then headed back to the ramp. Even though I didn’t catch any fish it was a beautiful morning paddling around in my W700 and I am thankful that I had the experience.

Here are a couple of pictures from my morning view.

scenery-near-fairfield-harbor, NC

 

view-of-the-shoreline

 

More fly fishing and rigging with Jill »

Paddling in Strong Wind

Paddling and Tracking in Strong wind

Tracking is the main problem that paddlers need to overcome when paddling in strong wind.
Wavewalk paddlers usually report excellent performance of their boats under wind, since catamarans tracks well, generally, and also thanks to the fact that it offers multiple means for power-paddling, as well as for counter-affecting the wind.
Since 2004, thousands of people have been paddling Wavewalk kayaks from the 300, 500 and 700 series, and none of these paddlers outfitted their Wavewalk with a rudder – that cumbersome device that has become an integral part of all other types of high-end kayaks used for touring and fishing.

Here are some tips that can improve your Wavewalk kayak’s performance when you’re paddling in strong wind:

1. Paddle only in the Riding Position, which is the optimal posture for power and balancing, and lean a bit forward, with your knees lower than your hips – That would give you extra power.

2. Paddle from the middle of the cockpit, as much as possible –

  • If you paddle from its rear it would raise your W kayak’s bow and expose it to the wind, and the boat will turn away from the wind.
  • If you paddle from the front of the cockpit, the stern will go up, and the kayak will turn into the wind.

3. Lean your W kayak into the wind – That would make it harder for it to affect the course of your W kayak.

4. Apply short J strokes on the side from which the wind is blowing, and more powerful strokes on the lee side (the sheltered side) – That would help you track. You may even hold the paddle not from its middle, so that you can apply longer strokes on the lee side.

6. Any object protruding from the deck is exposed to the wind, and therefore generates additional drag – Detach the spray shield if you have one attached, dismount deck mounted rod holders, and store your fishing rods inside the hulls whenever possible. A milk crate would act as a small sail that’s controlled by the wind, so you’d better avoid using one altogether.

7. Keep paddling in a steady pace and a straight course – This is not about one-time corrections, but about minimizing your effort and getting there. Precision and efficiency are as important as power.

8. IMPORTANT – Remember that you can easily move fore and aft along the Wavewalk’s saddle, and by doing so control the angle in which your W kayak will point relatively to the direction from which the wind blows: Paddling from a forward position will tend to point the kayak’s bow into the wind, and paddling from a backward position will tend to point the bow away from the wind.
By applying small changes to your own location on the saddle, you can minimize the wind’s unwanted effect on your Wavewalk, and keep it tracking with little effort.

Here is an instructional video on this subject:

DIY stakeout pole for shallow water fishing

By Michael Chesloff

The Issue

Windy days make it tougher to fish from almost any boat (even sailboats) but it is often just something that must be dealt with. The usual solution is to use an anchor, which I have been doing. Truth be told though, I wish there was something quicker and less involved.

Despite watching many YouTube videos where they were used I never thought to try one. Maybe this was because they were usually shown in clips about fishing in saltwater flats or bayous. I am usually in shallow water (less than 6 feet) because I primarily fish for bass but I never made the connection….duh!

Trial by Water

I made a quick prototype so I could experience the pros and cons. Suffice it to say, I was impressed! This was the same day I caught those 3 huge fish in my previous story.

Here is a picture of the pole holding my W500-

Stakeout pole - testing

The wind wasn’t too strong and it worked very well, even though it was only jammed about 6 inches into the mud. The real test came when I went to remove it from the lake bottom; it wasn’t easy!  It took some effort, pulling straight up, to remove it. This told me it should work well in almost any wind that I would choose to fish in.

The Build

The pole is made of only 3 pieces:

  1. A heavy-duty, fiberglass driveway marker, 1/2 inch diameter and 4 1/2 feet long.
  2. A 3 1/2 foot section of a wooden dowel, 1 inch in diameter
  3. A PVC pipe T-connector

Here is a picture of the fiberglass driveway marker-

 

  1. Remove the cap from the fiberglass pole
  2. Drill a 3 inch deep hole in one end of the dowel
  3. Insert the fiberglass pole into the hole with a generous amount of epoxy
  4. Attach the T-connector to the other end of the dowel

The finished project with a piece of pool noodle, a tether and a carabiner attached-

The Conclusion

Why did I wait so long? 🙂

Easy to make, inexpensive and effective. Using it is much easier, quicker and quieter then any anchor, conditions permitting. I highly recommend you make or buy 🙁 one ASAP.

Fishing for trout, surrounded by storms

By Steve Lucas

 

I really wanted to go to Flamingo for Fathers Day but when I woke up and checked the weather I saw conflicting wind forecasts. Then the radar showed some early small storms in Florida Bay. I checked Choko and it looked clear as a bell so that’s where I went.
Once I got on SR 29 heading south naturally I was greeted with huge flashes of lightning coming from the coast. “Oh well” I thought to myself “maybe it’s not over the bay”. I’m glad I kept going because it was a beautiful morning although the wind was higher than forecast.

I stayed close because there were storms all around. I stand up paddled the W 500 and caught a load of nice size trout. I did spot and hook a nice size Snook but lost him because of an inconsiderate Googan in a microskiff. I have most of the trout on Go Pro film and will post that later.
I took so many pictures of the clouds that I ran my battery out on the still machine.

20150621_09

 

clouds-on-the-water

 

dramatic-scenenery-with-storm-clouds

 

storm-clouds-chokoloskee-fishing-trip-fl

 

storm-clouds-during-fishing-trip-in-chokoloskee-fl

 

storm-clouds-over-the water-in-fishing-trip-in-chokoloskee-fl

 

trout-on-board-my-W500-chokoloskee-06-2015 (2)

 

trout-on-board-my-W500-chokoloskee-06-2015

Read more about Steve’s fishing trips and rigging tips »