Tag Archive: Wavewalk 700

Wavewalk 700 fishing kayaks and portable boats, a.k.a. W700

Beach cleaning mission – Wavewalk 700 as a service boat and pickup truck with lots of storage

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

Yesterday, I was joined by my wife, Carlene, and our local pirate queen, Calypso, to take a beach clean-up of the only naturally sandy beach in Key Largo.
We took the commercial fishing boat decked with W700’s to paddle and motor our way in.
Upon arrival offshore of Rattlesnake Key beach, I proceeded to anchor beyond casting range, upwind, and up current of a flats guide boat. Never, would I place my boat down current within the chum slick of a working fisherman. Nor, am I stupid enough to put my boat within casting range of an 8 ounce lead flung by a 6 foot Ugly Stik.
The most fashionably dressed guide proceeded to dress me out at the top of his lungs which I could barely hear as he was shouting into the breeze fifty yards downwind.
Somehow, I managed to gather that he thought I was blocking his fish from coming to him. to bite.
Rather than argue with ignorance, I moved my work boat further out to sea. The outboard motor on my Wavewalk more than compensates for increased distance to travel to shore.
My wife stayed on board as the “monitoring mate” of the Line Dancer while Calypso and I motored ashore to do our part to clean up the environment.
We all watched the guide and his two customers not catch fish as he spent most of his time flinging a fly line back and forth into the wind.
First rule of fishing: put your hook in the water.
However, that nasty tempered guide did look king of pretty in his fancy fishing outfit. But, my mates are a lot more foxy…

 

 

Carlene and Calypso on board the Line Dancer, which served as mother ship for our beach cleaning expedition

Larry also offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Wavewalk 700 review by Canadian fishing & hunting guide

By Russ Popp

 

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

I am very pleased about the Wavewalk 700 .
It is a very easy craft to get in and out of.
It is a very stable craft for older people to feel safe in.
Easy to transport.
As an retired Canadian Outfitter and Guide for fishing and hunting, there is definite use and purpose for the Wavewalk in my outdoor activities, leaving the other four canoes, three kayaks and one twelve foot aluminum boat at home that I already had.

Last fall I used it for fishing and goose hunting with my gun dog.

I got my wife out, in the Wavewalk, this last fall –

 

 

We have some great videos with a go-pro but can’t seem to post them on you tube for some reason?

The ice believe it or not is still on the lakes this spring.
I was ice fishing for Lake Trout three weeks ago.

Lots of work to do this spring.
Tear down the old cabin (Had it from 1966, until now), and build a four seasons home in the bush, one hundred miles from where we are now living.
Will have to sneak in some kind of time, somewhere for the Wavewalk, but don’t know where this spring?

 

Our aluminum boat

 

A friend I met years ago

 

Curious fox…

 

The only thing I am having trouble with the Wavewalk is, that here in Canada, the plumbing pipe sizes don’t match the American plumbing pipe size holes, in the seat to make accessories for the craft at this time.
I am sure at some point in time, after building our home in the bush, I will find away to get the right size plastic pipe, and stand attachments for bolting onto the plywood to make all my ideas I have in mind.
Too bad I am retired now from Outfitting American clients, because they could have brought some pipe and attachments up with them, when they came up hunting and fishing with me.

Stakeout pole for my Wavewalk 700

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

The wind has been screaming out of the ENE for four days now with no end in sight. But, it is flat calm in the creeks.

Yesterday morning, I purchased a stakeout pole and fabricated an adjustable pole holder for my W700 out of a busted electric trolling motor.
The fit is perfect and the removable rig works really well.

The fish were biting light that afternoon but I caught enough to provide a meal for my wife and myself.
Sure beats staring at all the other boats tied up to the docks…

 

Stakeout pole mounted on a Wavewalk 700

 

W700 outfitted with a stakeout pole

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Simple anchoring for Wavewalk fishing kayaks

By Gary Rankel

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club

 

A few years ago, not knowing any better, I submitted a short piece showing how to install an anchor trolley on my Wavewalk 500.
Having had 10 years experience and hundreds of fishing trips in my Wavewalk fishing machines, I’ve come up with a number of ideas to simplify rigging the W for fishing, one of which makes the anchor trolley idea obsolete.
While anchor trolleys are useful additions on mono hull yaks, the twin hull design of the W offers a much easier alternative.

All that is required are 2 holes drilled into the fore and aft cockpit rims (ignore the third middle hole in the photo used for another purpose), through which cords, knotted on each end, are attached.
Simply attach a plastic snap clip onto both the cord and anchor rope and “anchors away”. Deploy the anchor to the front or rear depending on which way the current is flowing. This is about as simple as it gets, with no banging of hardware on the W to spook fish.

This arrangement works with the W700 as well, however, the deck mount will prevent it from working on the front of the new S4.

Hope this helps Wavewalk users looking for a simple anchoring fix.

 

 

Read more about Gary’s kayak fishing trips »

 

Read Gary’s review of his Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak »

Wavewalk 700 mangrove tandem trip with Calypso

By Captain Larry Jarboe

 

 

Calypso crafts beautiful earrings out of fishing lures with the hooks removed. Her displays are becoming most popular in Key Largo locations. She is using the Mangrove Tunnel paddle method where the end of the paddle is used to fend off, the grip is used to pull thru, and, once in a while, you get a chance to slide the paddle thru the water. Often, you have to spin the paddle like a baton to accomplish fending or pulling depending on the side of the tunnel where one technique or the other is needed. That is why she has the paddle held in the center of the handle. Much like a soldier handling a gun at forward arms.
The tide does most of the work. And, we motored back up the tunnel because the ocean was ripping rough. We snaked thru that tunnel without a hitch but I did run out of gas later because of the longer run against the tide. Yes, the spare fuel can was tucked away in a hull tip. NBD.