Tag Archive: trolley

Very comfortable for a good long day on the lake

By Jim Gifford

Michigan

I am enjoying the boat very much. I am very happy with it.
I modified a cart to fit his boat and easily take the boat from the garage to my trailer then to the lakes pretty easily. I am experimenting with a trolling motor mount that will allow me to place the trolling motor to the side. I registered the boat to keep the state happy.

The grand kids have been out with me a few times, but don’t want to stay out as long as I wish. This should improve as they age and want to fish as much as play. It has proven to be a great boat to use on my own as well. I have lots of room for what I use to fish. Very comfortable for a good long day on the lake.

In all I enjoy using the boat very much and also the planning of ways to make it my own.

The motor mount is not fully tested. The cart is just 1inch pvc 31 inches long with 7 inches of a pool noodle at each end. This is tie strapped to a kayak cart I had already.

 

Wavewalk 700 with DIY motor mount

 

 

Wavewalk 700 attached to wheel cart

 

W700 on wheel cart

 

Paddling and sailing the Great Lakes with my Wavewalk 700

By Forrest Henry

Michigan

Everything is fine. Only been able to use the kayak for a few hours, but love it.
I also sailed the kayak for a while using the Wind Paddle sail. Looking forward to spring!!

I finished the spray skirt this morning. The driveway marker was too stiff, so I used a fiberglass flat strip that was part of a canopy for my rope hammock. The canvas lays on my lap when I sit in the center of the kayak.
I also attached a piece of lexan with velcro to the back of the kayak to use as a table.

wavewalk-700-kayak-with-spray-skirt-2-1024

wavewalk-700-kayak-with-spray-skirt-3-1024

wavewalk-700-kayak-with-spray-skirt-1024

wavewalk-700-kayak-with-wheel-cart-1024

And for a cart I am using a modified Magnus cart from paddlelogic. When the off-the-shelf Magnus did not fit, Dave, the owner, was very accommodating and made arms that are 3 inches longer and a wider axle.

No sailing pictures yet.

“Bonefish”, my customized, motorized Wavewalk 700

By Rem Seil

Florida

Completely satisfied with my W700, nicknamed “Bonefish”

I put an electric 46# thrust electric motor on my W700, which gives me just under 4 knots speed. Perfect for the short distance backwater fishing I do. Went a total of 14 knots the other day (measured by iPhone app Navionics which can give you speed, route, and total distance of trip), This was an extra long trip for me through the narrow backwater channels. The W700 performed like a charm.

Designed some aids that makes the W700 easier to move around on dry land and load. One is a two wheel apparatus that allows me to easy take the kayak from my Jeep to my garage where I store the W700 (see attached photo). Could also be used if had a long distance from Jeep to water’s edge, but have not needed to use this as can drive the Jeep right up to the water.

Also designed a “Catyak” (Catamaran Kayak) roof rack that enables the W700 to sit on top on my Jeep without sliding side to side (photos attached). Only need simple ties for forward an back. Load the kayak from the front end of the Jeep, using the hood as a “stepping stone”. Lay down little throw rugs on the hood and top of Jeep which enables me to simply push the W700 up the “ramp” sitting squarely on the Jeep’s modified roof rack. Can load and unload the Kayak in couple minutes without much effort.

Made some aids for the battery holder, fish pole holders (see photo attached), and other minor items that enable me to easily maneuver around and fish out of the W700. Each trip I learn a little more and when come back, I make the adjustments required to simplify matters enabling more effortless time fishing. But that is the beauty of the W700, she enables you to personalize your Kayak to exactly how you want and your needs. You just have to be a little creative in coming up with aids that allow you to do this. There is NO manual…

Overall, having a great time customizing “Bonefish” and catching lots of Reds and Snook in the process.

Thanks…

Remo “Captain Bonefish”

fishing kayak on roof rack

 

Pole Holder

Tite-Lok rod holders with DIY base inserted in the saddle

 

Roo fRack

 

Roof Rack 2

 

Trolly 2

 

Trolly

More rigging and fishing with “Captain Bonefish” »

More Wavewalk fishing kayak reviews »

 

 

Wheels For Transporting Your Fishing Kayak

You Don’t Always Need Wheels

This article presents different approaches to transporting your kayak on land. In many cases, you won’t need wheels for your Wavewalk™ kayak, as you’ll just drag it from your vehicle to your launching spot, and back. It’s not that hard, and it doesn’t necessarily damage the kayak, as you can see in this article and video »   
But if you must carry your kayak over long stretches of asphalt or concrete pavement, you may want to consider shielding its hulls from excessive abrasion by attaching the lid of a plastic bin to the part of its hulls that come in contact with the pavement. It’s an inexpensive, easy, and lightweight solution, and the lid can fold easily, so you can store it in one of the hull tips when you’re fishing and paddling.
The drawback of dragging a kayak over long distances is that it’s not always as easy as transporting it on wheels.

Kayak anglers have different fishing styles, and they fish in different environments. This fact, as well as logistic issues, affects the way they rig their fishing kayak with wheels (or a single wheel), a kayak trolley, cart or a simple mat.

These are the things you should require from your fishing kayak wheels –

Portability

We put this benefit first, because kayak anglers are often enthusiastic about making a perfect kayak trolley, and they tend to overlook the fact that once they reach the water, they’ll have to take it with them on board their kayak. Kayak wheels should be lightweight and preferably small in size, so you could easily tuck them in one of the storage compartments in the hull tips, or on top of them.

Solid Construction

You definitely don’t want your wheel cart to fall apart while you’re on your way from your car to the water, or back.

All-Terrain Capability

Wheels that are too small or too narrow could sink in sand, or in mud.  Large diameter wheels perform better on rugged terrain.  Wider wheels perform better on soft terrain, such as sand and mud.

Maneuverability

Sometimes you may need to pass with your fishing kayak in tight spaces. For example, in the space between two cars in a parking lot, or between big rocks, tree stumps, etc. In such cases, being able to control your fishing kayak on wheels is important.

Easy and Effective Attachment

Attaching the wheels to your fishing kayak, as well as detaching them should be quick and easy, and the attachment system should hold the kayak in place without letting it slide or twist. You definitely don’t want to waste time and energy on complicated systems for attaching your kayak to your wheel cart, and you don’t want to have to reattach the kayak on your way to the beach or from it.

Stability and Control

Unlike other kayaks, Wavewalk™ kayaks feature two handles on each end. Each pair of handles allow you to drive the kayak as a wheelbarrow, and benefit from good stability and control over it even if it’s outfitted with a single wheels attached between the hulls. having said that, the more fishing and camping gear you carry in your kayak, the more it becomes heavy, and this could make it harder to stabilize and control. This is when a two-wheel solution is better than one wheel.

Examples of Wheels for Kayak Transportation »

New rigging and fish pics

By Ray Schwertner

Here are some rigging pictures (latest) of my boat. Note how the console with the seat can be easily lifted out and replaced in one of three forward or rearward positions. You can mount your stuff on it. The “u” brackets made this possible.

I show the pivot up and down transducer in the rear and the screen on the front motor console/step combination.

The PVC rod holders work great especially for bass fishing where you need them handy, but not in the way. A lot easier to reach than the rear mount standard holders..which are still used on occasion to hold the anchor or a rod. (When you put a rod in it, it can get hung on tree limbs or sometimes it would hit it with my casting rod.

I discarded the anchor trolley from my early days. You can see a wind up cleat on the console that goes to a pulley. If I need to adjust for wind direction, I just hang the rope over a cleat on the from, or back or side.

I think you could offer a drop in console with a seat option and maybe place to mount other items the user may want.

The trolley really works great… as you can see it fits inside the saddle space. You just raise up the W, push it under to catch the first or second rib, then raise it a little more an push it forward to get the second upright positioned on a rib further to the front. I tried to use a flexible design that you could fold, but to hard and too unstable. As you can see my trolley is fixed and strong enough to support the weight of the W and it accessories.

I think a customized trolley similar to this design would be a great accessory for you to sell, in addition to the console and maybe and electric motor mount. I just don’t get the folks who are powered up with gas outboard. But to each his own…

Finally the rope I am holding just comes out of a hole I drilled to keep it off the deck… My hooks have a way of finding the ropes that are nearby. That causes a lot of lost fishing time.

This fish are two black crappie. One other one got off before I got him welcomed aboard. Caught them on a 3/8 oz lipless crank bait called “Diamond Dust” from Academy spots. Usually a good bass lure but I have been catching crappie like these recently.

a-pair-of-black-crappie-hanging-on-the-kayak-side

 

two-black-crappie-on-deck

Black Crappie

two-black-crappie

horizontal-rod-holder-close-up-01

DIY horizontal rod holder

horizontal-rod-holder-02

horizontal-rod-holder-01

DIY horizontal rod holder

motor-mount-close-up-01

Seat backrest in upward position

seat-folded-01

Seat backrest folded down

 

motor-mount-close-up-02

Front mount for trolling motor

top-view-01

Rigged fishing kayak with front mounted trolling motor – top front view

motor-mount-close-up-01

Front mounted trolling motor

tackle-box-on-deck-01

Tackle box on deck

tackle-box-on-deck-02

Tackle box on deck

tackle-box-on-deck-03

transducer-in-high-position

Fish finder transducer in high position

transducer-lower-position-01

Fish finder transducer in low position

kayak-motor-seat-paddle

kayak-trolley-and-seat-01

motor-mount-with-anchor-cable-01

seat-in-upward-position-01

side-view-01

 

trolley-and-seat-close-up-01

trolley-for-kayak-transportation-03

trolley-for-transportation-close-up-02

trolley-wheels-close-up-01

 

More DIY outfitting projects and fishing reports from Ray »