Tag Archive: touring

Four boaters in one Wavewalk S4 skiff on a trip to Peanut Island

By Jesse Stephenson

West Palm Beach, Florida

Candy and I had friends visit from North Carolina, and we took them over to Peanut Island, and hung out for the day.
What a blast!
We went all four of us in the boat. We had to go slow but it works fine. It was only about a half mile ride over.
We had probably a little over 700 lbs of payload on board.

 

Skiff, sun, fun…

This 100 lbs Wavewalk S4 skiff carried over 700 lbs of payload…

Wavewalk S4 skiff side by side with a conventional skiff

Shooting an aerial view of the S4 boat and its crew of four

 

More Wavewalk S4 adventures with Jesse and Candy »

 

Two cuties in the water

By Jesse Stephenson

 

We took the boat out yesterday and cruised around Peanut Island. The perfect little boat for exploring in places bigger boats just can’t get to.

Candy loves the little boat… Two cuties in the water 🙂

 

 

More from Jesse and Candy in West Palm Beach, Florida »

Touring and diving with the Wavewalk S4x3 multi boat – skiff

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

Carlene, my wife is the camera lady.
Amy, Rebecca, and Calypso are the phenomenally photogenic crew.

The S4x3 performs very well, underway and at anchor.
We swam with the regular contingent of Caribbean fish but a nurse shark and an albino manatee cruised through the snorkeling quartet of mermaids too.

And, we motored with a family of dolphins who had to check out the new gray and white critter on the surface.

It is so wonderful to be surrounded by beautiful happy women.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Larry offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Wavewalk 700 mangrove tandem trip with Calypso

By Captain Larry Jarboe

 

 

Calypso crafts beautiful earrings out of fishing lures with the hooks removed. Her displays are becoming most popular in Key Largo locations. She is using the Mangrove Tunnel paddle method where the end of the paddle is used to fend off, the grip is used to pull thru, and, once in a while, you get a chance to slide the paddle thru the water. Often, you have to spin the paddle like a baton to accomplish fending or pulling depending on the side of the tunnel where one technique or the other is needed. That is why she has the paddle held in the center of the handle. Much like a soldier handling a gun at forward arms.
The tide does most of the work. And, we motored back up the tunnel because the ocean was ripping rough. We snaked thru that tunnel without a hitch but I did run out of gas later because of the longer run against the tide. Yes, the spare fuel can was tucked away in a hull tip. NBD.