Tag Archive: tidal current

Fishing with my Wavewalk S4 out of Woods Hole, Cape Cod

By Mike Silva

 

I went fishing out of Woods Hole, Cape Cod. We had strong tidal currents today, and the sea was a bit rough with 16 mph SE wind and gusts up to 22 mph. We did pretty well though.
I’m getting a spray shield.

Wavewalk S4 mounted with a 6 HP Suzuki outboard motor. Cape Cod, November 2017. The fish on the front deck are Tautog (blackfish).

 


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Fishing The Mangrove Tunnels

By Captain Larry Jarboe

 

This particular tunnel is inaccessible during high tide. Most are not this narrow. But, there are plenty of fish waiting to get caught.

That 3.5 hp Nissan [Tohatsu] is a long shaft outboard that I found south of Jacksonville for 200 bucks. With a new carb and a fresh impeller (less than 100 bucks) she is a fine runner.

Note the DIY handle of the tiller extension: It is easy to grab behind my back to steer. On straight hauls, I rest my back upon it and steer with the paddle. Good vibrations…

The pics are from the stern of the boat. As the tide pulls me thru the narrow cuts, the main resistance, the OB lower unit, wants to move forward. This gives me better control and helps clear the mangrove spider webs ahead.

Also, I built a combo 3 rod holder, Go-Pro, fish de-hooker, bait knife, and line clipper holder that fits in a single support hole of the W700 and Series 4 vessels. When I get the French fry holder mounted, I’ll post a pic.

 

 

Today’s catch before filleting

This trip produced Mangrove Snappers, Caesar Grunts, and Bermuda Chubs. We ate the snappers and grunts for lunch. The chubs will be smoked to make fish dip.

fried fresh fish fillets

Panko fried fresh fish fillets

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Duck boat for two hunters – Wavewalk 700

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

Well I haven’t sent in a report lately because I have been deer hunting and the Wavewalks were not involved. But now it is on to ducks and the Wavewalks are an essential part of our arsenal.
We have long paddles in strong currents and in rough weather and the Wavewalk handles it just fine!
The W700 is particularly good as a duck boat. Two hunters can carry their gear and tandem paddling makes the currents no big deal.

On this trip we were able to use the outgoing tide as well as the current from a river to make the trip back home easy. According to the GPS we were doing 7-8 mph paddling with the current.

I have designed a blind for the boat but have yet to finish building it.

Most of the time the Wavewalks are only used as transportation. We are also able to transport 3 dozen deeks, two hunters, shooting boxes, guns, camo nets, all in the W700!

Enjoying the stability and versatility of the these kayaks.

Here are a few pictures from our latest duck hunt.

double

Double

drake-crush

Drake crush

ducks-in-the-deeks

Ducks in the deeks

wigeon-down

Wigeon down

 

More kayak rigging, fishing and duck hunting with Chris »

Great duck hunting boat!

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

This is the first duck hunting season we have used both the W500 and the W700 as duck hunting boats and they are doing great!
It would be easy to put a blind on it (we have one all designed) but we mostly use the boats for transportation.
The area we hunt is tidal mud flat.  So the cover is minimal, actually non-existent.   We sit on beach chairs in the mud and pretend to be a log.   However, where the Wavewalk’s shine is in getting us to the spot.
We paddle for 1.5miles over water that runs from 6 inches to 20 feet, with lots of logs, mussel beds, and all sorts of things that are a constant danger to motorized boats.  In addition once we get to the spot we will be on the move the whole day.  For instance yesterday’s tide went from 1.9 feet at 3 am to a 14.4 feet at 9:54 am and then back to 4.9 feet at 4:43 pm.  We hunted from 5 am until about 4:00pm.  So we saw and moved through most of that. We start on a mud flat, retreat to a log and end up back on the mud flat.   It is work intensive hunting!
The Wavewalk makes it possible for a couple of reasons.
One it handles the current and wind with great proficiency.  Tidal current is a constant, one direction or the other.  In addition, this is the mouth of the Nisqually river, so you have a lot of water coming from there.  And it seems there is always a wind and often with accompanying waves.  With the Wavewalk you are able to paddle through all of this and feel secure knowing that you can handle it.  It is not just a convenience it is a safety issue.
We are paddling in water that has a constant temperature year round of 54 degrees, but the air temperature yesterday started at 24 degrees raising to a balmy 36, and oh yeah we paddle to the spot in the dark.  If you get in trouble you are on your own.
Often people ask me why not put a motor on it?  For one simple reason; MUD!  We move about 200 yards between low and high tides and then back again.   During that we are dragging our boats forward and backward with the tide.  We drag them in mud that can actually be a danger if you get stuck. The Coast guard had to airlift rescue a duck hunter from this marsh already this year who was stuck in the mud.  Dragging 60 or 80 lbs of boat through mud is a challenge, but if you added the weight of a motor it would become impractical.
The second reason the Wavewalks are so perfect for this hunting is the sheer storage.  In the W700 I am able to transport 36 decoys, camo blankets for the boat and hunters, shotgun, lawn chair, hunting bucket, thermos, and myself with ease.  In fact there is so much room in W700’s it hauls all of the decoys!

Yesterday I was able to take a friend who had never hunted in this way and put him in a Wavewalk for the first time.  He is a big fellow so I put him in the W700.  With very little effort he was comfortably  and efficiently paddling, and we had a great hunt.

These boats are not just for fishing but they make great duck boats as well. So far this duck season the Wavewalks have gotten us 63 ducks, and we still have January to go!

Loving the Wavewalk as a great duck boat!  Enjoy a few pictures of the season!

 

chucks ducks

Wavewalk 700 (front) and Wavewalk 500 (back), guns, and ducks…

 

decoys-floating

 

duck-decoys-floating

 

duck-decoys-viewed-from-the-beach

 

duck-hunters-shooting-from-the-beach

 

duck-hunter-standing-in-the-water

 

duck-hunters-with-camo-paint

 

duck-hunter-with-boats

 

More fishing and duck hunting with Chris »

Pufferbelly fish saves the day

By Jill Toler

I had a successful first kayak fishing trip so I decided to up the stakes and try a fishing trip in an area that has tidal current and possibly wind. Who am I kidding, more like probably wind. I checked the forecast that indicated the wind would blow WNW 5-10 mph. You would think after all these years of experience with forecast vs. actual wind speeds that I would know better. Always add at least 5 mph to the forecast, then add another 5 just for good measure. Still, I would not be deterred and decided to try fishing at the Harker’s Island bridge. Specks [speckled sea trout] were being caught and I wanted in on the action.

Fishing Buddy and I made a plan to meet at the foot of the bridge. I was running about 10 minutes behind because my little dog, June Bug, did not want to come back into the house on such a beautiful morning. After all, there are marvelous things happening in the backyard at 7:50 am…

I arrived at the destination and as I crossed the bridge I spotted Fishing Buddy already on the water and hooked up with a fish. I had been nervous for two days anticipating what it would be like to deal with wind and tide. When I realized that I was on my own getting unloaded, geared up, and paddling to the fishing spot I sort of got scared and began doubting my ability. I actually went out a little ways and turned right back around for the shore to calm my nerves. A few deep breaths and words of encouragement from myself found me paddling away from security and right into chaos. Not only would there be wind and tide, but there would be boat traffic and wakes. I managed to pick my way through boats and make it over to where Fishing Buddy was catching a fish on just about every cast. I thought, “this is going to be epic!” I chose the wrong word for the coming experience.

Anchoring in a kayak is way different than anchoring in a boat. I’m glad that I installed that anchor trolley, but I would have been more happy had I actually learned how it works prior to being smack dab in the middle of the excitement. To say that it took me a while to get the anchor deployed, set, and secured so as to position my kayak in the direction that I needed would be a major understatement. There is a lot to learn of kayak fishing.

Finally, the anchor was set and by sending it towards the back of the kayak the wind or tide or something turned me right around so that I was facing the action and not staring at the beautiful homes along the shoreline. I was able to make a cast and hooked right up…….with a pufferbelly. Some folks call them blowtoads, blowfish, puffers, etc. I call them, “I ain’t getting skunked today!”

Somehow, my fly line got wrapped up in my reel and just as my luck would have it, the bite shut down by the time I got everything straightened out. I tried a few more spots, but no takers.

It wasn’t the worst day because I did catch one fish and I challenged myself. I learned a lot that day and will make some adjustments for my next trip and will be better prepared for the adventure.

At lunch, Fishing Buddy told me that I did very well considering the wind, tide, and boat traffic. She also said that she had a heck of a time staying in position and that it was a tough day to fly fish from a kayak. I went, I saw, I learned, and I can’t wait to do it again.

 


 

More fly fishing from Jill’s W700 »