Tag Archive: strong wind

Electric Wavewalk 700 in Key Largo snorkeling tour

By Captain Larry Jarboe

W700 shuttle to the reef –

Wavewalking is not just about fishing.

Yesterday, in Key Largo, the wind was ripping about 20-25 kts. out of the East. We had a friend from NYC who was facing her last vacation day in the Keys. My wife had promised her a snorkel trip on the reef and it was my job to make it happen.

Despite the gusty wind and skirting a large squall, I knew the conditions would afford a calm pocket of water behind Grecian Rocks on dead low tide.

After a rather tumultuous ride offshore, we tied to one of the mooring balls behind the reef. Due to shifting wind, the mooring lines have to be far away enough from the coral rocks to allow boats to swing 360 degrees and not hit the shallow reef. This means snorkelers have to swim the distance of about half a football field of grass and sand to get to the edge of the reef where most of the fish reside.

This is a long way for many people to swim against the wind surge but it beats trying to snorkel in 4-5 foot seas which was the norm everywhere else..

I launched my W700 with a bow mounted Minnkota Rip Tide electric trolling motor from the mother ship. A line tied to a ring buoy trailed as a stern line to tow my two masked grand matrons to snorkeling nirvana. Of course, I waited at the edge of the reef to provide a place of rest and a leisurely ride home.

In addition to fishing, duck hunting, exploring, stand up joystick water skimming or laid back paddle yakking, the W700 makes a fine yacht tender as well as a snorkeler shuttle service to the reef.

Saddled aboard his trusty Wavewalk steed, indeed, Larry, The Stable Guy, got ‘er done.

Again…

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Larry The Stable Guy

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Over the weekend, I bow mounted a 30 lb. thrust Minnkota Endura electric trolling motor to my W700. This $99 motor is over 20 years old. Though it is labeled for freshwater use, it works fine in saltwater if it is hosed off after usage

Though I’d like to use a lithium battery, the price is still too high. So, I have an extra marine lead acid battery that slips easily into the forward hull.

With the motor locked in forward, it is easy to steer with a long handled canoe paddle from the stern while standing and even perform some slightly impressive maneuvers. This is wonderfully enjoyable but not too strenuous exercise.

It was too rough on the ocean for the bikini clad paddle boarders to be able to manage the wind and chop but the lone powered paddle cat-a-yakker was able to “Get ‘er done” despite conditions that kept the other yaks and paddle boards on shore.

My other brother, Larry, may be the Cable Guy. With the W700, a little extra thrust, and the plaid sleeveless cotton shirt, I have a new moniker: Larry, The Stable Guy

P.S. – The Wavewalk ball cap and motor bracket are available to purchase on the website.

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Paddling in Strong Wind

Paddling and Tracking in Strong wind

Tracking is the main problem that paddlers need to overcome when paddling in strong wind.
Wavewalk paddlers usually report excellent performance of their boats under wind, since catamarans tracks well, generally, and also thanks to the fact that it offers multiple means for power-paddling, as well as for counter-affecting the wind.
Since 2004, thousands of people have been paddling Wavewalk kayaks from the 300, 500 and 700 series, and none of these paddlers outfitted their Wavewalk with a rudder – that cumbersome device that has become an integral part of all other types of high-end kayaks used for touring and fishing.

Here are some tips that can improve your Wavewalk kayak’s performance when you’re paddling in strong wind:

1. Paddle only in the Riding Position, which is the optimal posture for power and balancing, and lean a bit forward, with your knees lower than your hips – That would give you extra power.

2. Paddle from the middle of the cockpit, as much as possible –

  • If you paddle from its rear it would raise your W kayak’s bow and expose it to the wind, and the boat will turn away from the wind.
  • If you paddle from the front of the cockpit, the stern will go up, and the kayak will turn into the wind.

3. Lean your W kayak into the wind – That would make it harder for it to affect the course of your W kayak.

4. Apply short J strokes on the side from which the wind is blowing, and more powerful strokes on the lee side (the sheltered side) – That would help you track. You may even hold the paddle not from its middle, so that you can apply longer strokes on the lee side.

6. Any object protruding from the deck is exposed to the wind, and therefore generates additional drag – Detach the spray shield if you have one attached, dismount deck mounted rod holders, and store your fishing rods inside the hulls whenever possible. A milk crate would act as a small sail that’s controlled by the wind, so you’d better avoid using one altogether.

7. Keep paddling in a steady pace and a straight course – This is not about one-time corrections, but about minimizing your effort and getting there. Precision and efficiency are as important as power.

8. IMPORTANT – Remember that you can easily move fore and aft along the Wavewalk’s saddle, and by doing so control the angle in which your W kayak will point relatively to the direction from which the wind blows: Paddling from a forward position will tend to point the kayak’s bow into the wind, and paddling from a backward position will tend to point the bow away from the wind.
By applying small changes to your own location on the saddle, you can minimize the wind’s unwanted effect on your Wavewalk, and keep it tracking with little effort.

Here is an instructional video on this subject:

One step at a time

By Dario Lazaric

Melbourne, Australia

I haven’t been in a lot of kayaks before.
I’ve been out with my wavewalk a couple of times, even caught a fish. Stood up, paddled, good fun.
It was tough paddling against the wind and waves, but I’m very happy with it, and it can do much more than in the conditions I took it out in.
Will take it out again sometime when the wind isn’t too strong. I want to get the motor on board as well, but one step at a time. I need to get an anchor, how do I attach it?
Very happy with it. I feel very safe and happy in the wavewalk.

 

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4 hp mercury outboard. Fitting the transom mount

 

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20″ propeller shaft

 

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Will need wheels to carry the wavewalk to the beach with the motor attached to it.


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First impression from our Wavewalk 700

By Jon Cohen

Massachusetts

My W700 arrived on last Monday. My son wanted to head out to the nearest pond straight away but the rain put a stop to that. The weather was much improved on Wednesday afternoon so we headed out for our first trip! We carried the boat out of the house (happy wife 🙂 ) and easily loaded it on top of our SUV. I ran nylon tie-down straps through the pad eyes and secured the boat to the rack.
We arrived at the pond, removed the straps and had the W700 in the water in 5 minutes.
My son and I stepped in and pushed off from the shore. Good call on recommending the 9′ paddle. Paddling was easy. So easy that my 13 year old volunteered to take over.
There was a fair amount of wind but it didn’t seem to cause us any problems. We spent a very comfortable (no back ache) hour on the pond, stepped out (dry of course) and loaded the boat back on our SUV in no time.
My son decided he was cold so he headed in to the house as soon as we got back home leaving me to remove the boat from the SUV. No problem! It is so easy to handle. I took it down and slid it across my yard to the storage area at the back of my house.
We’ve been out three times so far and I already caught my first fish of the season!
Looking forward to many more fishing trips in my W!

 

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Roomy cockpit for two anglers

 

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