Tag Archive: stakeout pole

From Wavewalk 500 kayak to Wavewalk S4 skiff

Dan VanMetre

Texas

I bought an S4 a few months ago and wanted to share what I’ve done with it and how I’m using it.
Couldn’t be happier with the boat.

I upgraded to an S4 skiff after owning an original Wavewalk for many years. I fish the Texas Gulf coast and have loved my new S4. Not only have I spent a lot of time on the water … I have spent a lot of time in the garage and at the hardware store customizing it for what I love to do. I wanted to share some of the ways I have configured my skiff. Thanks Yoav for making this boat!!

 

I know this won’t be for everybody, but I have been completely thrilled with how the S4 has performed with the motor configuration I used. I bought a 15 inch shaft 6 HP motor and ended up raising the transom so that the bottom of the motor’s skeg is only 6 inches below the hulls. I fish very shallow water and can run full speed in basically ankle-deep water. The prop is high enough that it would cut through the hull on a turn so I had to attach a carefully sized piece of polyethene to the motor to prevent the prop from getting to close to the hull. I am getting 13 mph top speed with this set-up.

 

Out-of-the-way spot to carry a full-sized bucket, cast net, and bait box.

 

I put a drain on both sides of the skiff. This has really worked out great. It makes it easy to get the water out of the hulls during clean-up and also gives me peace of mind when I haul it on top of my truck in heavy rain. I screw them in from the top so the bottom hulls remains a smooth surface.

 

I have had a blast customizing the S4 and there is so, so much you can do. Here is where I officially went overboard….I love the up-front storage for life jackets, wading boots, ice chest, etc. But I wanted that stuff to stay up front when I am driving on a plane and bouncing around. I put in some PVC twistable stoppers. A little much, but it works great!

 

The S4 has worked great for sight fishing redfish on the Texas gulf coast. I stand on the front deck and paddle a shallow shoreline. When I see the redfish, I put the oar in the front holder, twist and push the pole to anchor, grab the rod and make a cast. Quick, quiet, and efficient.

 

Chair works great. Less than $10. I attached a piece of PVC to the base so it stays secure and put some ethafoam for support. It can be moved to any hole in the saddle and it even swivels.

 

I installed 2 watertight portals into the saddle. One in front and one in back. I wedged a piece of ethafoam right behind the openings and also in the brackets so items stay within reach and don’t get stuck. I can store a lot of tackle and equipment.

 

 

Stakeout pole for my Wavewalk 700

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

The wind has been screaming out of the ENE for four days now with no end in sight. But, it is flat calm in the creeks.

Yesterday morning, I purchased a stakeout pole and fabricated an adjustable pole holder for my W700 out of a busted electric trolling motor.
The fit is perfect and the removable rig works really well.

The fish were biting light that afternoon but I caught enough to provide a meal for my wife and myself.
Sure beats staring at all the other boats tied up to the docks…

 

Stakeout pole mounted on a Wavewalk 700

 

W700 outfitted with a stakeout pole

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Wavewalk 700 skiff-kayak and Ricky Rods: A winning mangrove fishing combo

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

Yesterday, I took my W700 and a couple rigged Ricky Rods to little Snapper Creek that is virtually inaccessible to any other vessels. Only a motorized kayak can easily go the distance to get in there and back. Within a half hour, I had my limit of 5 legal Mangrove Snapper (over 10″) in my fish bag and hit the dock before a storm rolled in.

 

 

Wavewalk and Ricky Rod teamed up to put the limit of good eating snapper on my dock. Looks like we have a winning combination –

My first fishing rod that I purchased in the Keys in 1974 was a solid glass Ricky Rod. That rod set me back six bucks and has caught more species of fish than all my other rods together.
When I ran bottom and chumming charter and commercial fishing trips from my 25′ six-pack diesel powered Kencraft in the 1980’s, Ricky Rods with American made Penn spinning reels put fish in the boat on every trip. No skunk in the box with a Ricky Rod in hand.
About 3 years ago, on a Sunday morning, I spotted the Ricky delivery van at the Yellow Bait House in Key Largo. I pulled over to talk to the old timer who was delivering tackle from the Ricky company.
After telling him how great my first rod still is and how much I like Ricky products, the octogenarian looked at me and said, “Well, I am Ricky!”
Amazed at how the owner of a big Miami company would take such a hands on approach, I listened to his story.
Mr. Ricky came from Cuba many years ago to escape the oppressive Castro regime. He built his company with hard work and fine products that are still reasonably priced. And, he invited me for a personal tour of his company. My buddy, Peg Leg Dan, wants to go with me. He has been fishing a Ricky Rod for as long as I have.
Last week, at the Yellow Bait House, I spotted some short 48″ rods that are perfect for kayak fishing in tight quarters. Yes, they are Ricky Rods. Mr. Ricky is still innovating at eighty plus years old.
So, I bought one and came back for two more.

 


Larry also offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

DIY stakeout pole for shallow water fishing

By Michael Chesloff

The Issue

Windy days make it tougher to fish from almost any boat (even sailboats) but it is often just something that must be dealt with. The usual solution is to use an anchor, which I have been doing. Truth be told though, I wish there was something quicker and less involved.

Despite watching many YouTube videos where they were used I never thought to try one. Maybe this was because they were usually shown in clips about fishing in saltwater flats or bayous. I am usually in shallow water (less than 6 feet) because I primarily fish for bass but I never made the connection….duh!

Trial by Water

I made a quick prototype so I could experience the pros and cons. Suffice it to say, I was impressed! This was the same day I caught those 3 huge fish in my previous story.

Here is a picture of the pole holding my W500-

Stakeout pole - testing

The wind wasn’t too strong and it worked very well, even though it was only jammed about 6 inches into the mud. The real test came when I went to remove it from the lake bottom; it wasn’t easy!  It took some effort, pulling straight up, to remove it. This told me it should work well in almost any wind that I would choose to fish in.

The Build

The pole is made of only 3 pieces:

  1. A heavy-duty, fiberglass driveway marker, 1/2 inch diameter and 4 1/2 feet long.
  2. A 3 1/2 foot section of a wooden dowel, 1 inch in diameter
  3. A PVC pipe T-connector

Here is a picture of the fiberglass driveway marker-

 

  1. Remove the cap from the fiberglass pole
  2. Drill a 3 inch deep hole in one end of the dowel
  3. Insert the fiberglass pole into the hole with a generous amount of epoxy
  4. Attach the T-connector to the other end of the dowel

The finished project with a piece of pool noodle, a tether and a carabiner attached-

The Conclusion

Why did I wait so long? 🙂

Easy to make, inexpensive and effective. Using it is much easier, quicker and quieter then any anchor, conditions permitting. I highly recommend you make or buy 🙁 one ASAP.

Outfitting my W500 and dreaming of bass while waiting for the thaw

By Mike Brown

Virginia

Not getting in much fishing in during the coldest part of winter. Have been on local waters a few times this winter, but had to break through ice on the lake during my last outing. Looks like I’ll have to wait for the thaw now. The bass in my area seemed pretty darned elusive during the cold anyway. Did manage to make and test a modification to my W500, though. See the pics of anchor trolley and anchor system.

Some time ago I saw some posts on the blog for anchor rigging, but didn’t appreciate the need. My pre-Wavewalk fishing experience was always on a partner’s bass boat with a trolling motor for station keeping. Had several frustrating experiences in my W500 juggling paddle and rod while the wind blew me around. Found myself curtailing trips if wind was going to be up. I certainly don’t want to limit my fishing to dead calm days (or if fishing in any moving waters), and now wouldn’t go out without an anchor and/or a stakeout pole.

Got most everything for the trolley and anchor from my local home improvement store and Walmart. Hopefully, my spouse won’t notice that I cut up our daughter’s pool noodle for the rod keeper & float combo. Easy to deploy – just drop it into the water and the line spins out. When sufficiently spooled out, loop line into j-hook slot at end of PVC pipe and clip carabiner at other end of PVC pipe into trolley ring. If you need to quickly detach anchor and move, do so and return to anchor float later. I got the idea from one of John Oast’s Fishyaker videos.

I love figuring these things out and fabricating them myself.

Mike

P.S.

Saw comment about strapping my DIY rod holder to the saddle bracket and how that might stress screws holding saddle bracket. Thought of that and added 1” stainless washers to the saddle bracket screws to spread stress.

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More rigging and fishing from Mike Brown »