Tag Archive: stake-out pole

Stakeout pole for my Wavewalk 700

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

The wind has been screaming out of the ENE for four days now with no end in sight. But, it is flat calm in the creeks.

Yesterday morning, I purchased a stakeout pole and fabricated an adjustable pole holder for my W700 out of a busted electric trolling motor.
The fit is perfect and the removable rig works really well.

The fish were biting light that afternoon but I caught enough to provide a meal for my wife and myself.
Sure beats staring at all the other boats tied up to the docks…

 

Stakeout pole mounted on a Wavewalk 700

 

W700 outfitted with a stakeout pole

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Wavewalk 700 skiff-kayak and Ricky Rods: A winning mangrove fishing combo

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

Yesterday, I took my W700 and a couple rigged Ricky Rods to little Snapper Creek that is virtually inaccessible to any other vessels. Only a motorized kayak can easily go the distance to get in there and back. Within a half hour, I had my limit of 5 legal Mangrove Snapper (over 10″) in my fish bag and hit the dock before a storm rolled in.

 

 

Wavewalk and Ricky Rod teamed up to put the limit of good eating snapper on my dock. Looks like we have a winning combination –

My first fishing rod that I purchased in the Keys in 1974 was a solid glass Ricky Rod. That rod set me back six bucks and has caught more species of fish than all my other rods together.
When I ran bottom and chumming charter and commercial fishing trips from my 25′ six-pack diesel powered Kencraft in the 1980’s, Ricky Rods with American made Penn spinning reels put fish in the boat on every trip. No skunk in the box with a Ricky Rod in hand.
About 3 years ago, on a Sunday morning, I spotted the Ricky delivery van at the Yellow Bait House in Key Largo. I pulled over to talk to the old timer who was delivering tackle from the Ricky company.
After telling him how great my first rod still is and how much I like Ricky products, the octogenarian looked at me and said, “Well, I am Ricky!”
Amazed at how the owner of a big Miami company would take such a hands on approach, I listened to his story.
Mr. Ricky came from Cuba many years ago to escape the oppressive Castro regime. He built his company with hard work and fine products that are still reasonably priced. And, he invited me for a personal tour of his company. My buddy, Peg Leg Dan, wants to go with me. He has been fishing a Ricky Rod for as long as I have.
Last week, at the Yellow Bait House, I spotted some short 48″ rods that are perfect for kayak fishing in tight quarters. Yes, they are Ricky Rods. Mr. Ricky is still innovating at eighty plus years old.
So, I bought one and came back for two more.

 


Larry also offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

DIY stakeout pole for shallow water fishing

By Michael Chesloff

The Issue

Windy days make it tougher to fish from almost any boat (even sailboats) but it is often just something that must be dealt with. The usual solution is to use an anchor, which I have been doing. Truth be told though, I wish there was something quicker and less involved.

Despite watching many YouTube videos where they were used I never thought to try one. Maybe this was because they were usually shown in clips about fishing in saltwater flats or bayous. I am usually in shallow water (less than 6 feet) because I primarily fish for bass but I never made the connection….duh!

Trial by Water

I made a quick prototype so I could experience the pros and cons. Suffice it to say, I was impressed! This was the same day I caught those 3 huge fish in my previous story.

Here is a picture of the pole holding my W500-

Stakeout pole - testing

The wind wasn’t too strong and it worked very well, even though it was only jammed about 6 inches into the mud. The real test came when I went to remove it from the lake bottom; it wasn’t easy!  It took some effort, pulling straight up, to remove it. This told me it should work well in almost any wind that I would choose to fish in.

The Build

The pole is made of only 3 pieces:

  1. A heavy-duty, fiberglass driveway marker, 1/2 inch diameter and 4 1/2 feet long.
  2. A 3 1/2 foot section of a wooden dowel, 1 inch in diameter
  3. A PVC pipe T-connector

Here is a picture of the fiberglass driveway marker-

 

  1. Remove the cap from the fiberglass pole
  2. Drill a 3 inch deep hole in one end of the dowel
  3. Insert the fiberglass pole into the hole with a generous amount of epoxy
  4. Attach the T-connector to the other end of the dowel

The finished project with a piece of pool noodle, a tether and a carabiner attached-

The Conclusion

Why did I wait so long? 🙂

Easy to make, inexpensive and effective. Using it is much easier, quicker and quieter then any anchor, conditions permitting. I highly recommend you make or buy 🙁 one ASAP.

Kayak fishing for redfish in St. Augustine, by Gene Andrews

I like to fish for reds in very shallow water, up to 12″ deep. The W500 is the perfect kayak for that, since it moves well in the grass and weeds. Sitting higher and standing up give me a better view of the water around me, so I can see where the fish are, or may be.

Gene

A stakeout pole works better than an anchor in such shallow water

Not every kayak works as well as the W500 for shallow water fishing.

More kayak fishing with Gene »

About fishing kayak design, innovation, upgrades, accessories, etc.

This article is based on questions emailed to us by Dan from Southern Australia, and on our response to his questions.

Dan wrote us: -“Hi guys at Wavewalk. Congratulations on a great product. I am a recent convert to this kayak fishing scene and am still in the process of deciding what yak will suit me and my fishing. After trolling the net for weeks I found video of your craft and was very excited – OK it’s not the sexiest rig around but seemed to be the smartest design… So my problem is you guys have built this thing and stopped!… Where’s the upgrades, where’s the factory accessories, what’s the deal with the foam noodles everyone?…”

And this was our answer to Dan’s questions:

Thanks Dan,

Indeed, the kayak business is extremely competitive.
We’ve started selling our kayaks back in 2004, and since then we’ve seen most of our competitors either disappear or change owners –
This includes small, medium size and big kayak companies.

Our competitors offer products that are essentially the same, namely variations on sit-in and sit-on-top (SOT) kayaks.
If you look at the designs (forms) themselves, you’ll find no noteworthy change in the past 40 years since such kayaks were first roto-molded.
None of our competitors has any technological advantage over the others, so they are forced to compete by offering many accessories, whether that makes sense or not, plenty of unnecessary detail in their designs, intensive promotion (hype), and price.

Wavewalk has a proprietary technology that puts us in a different category.
Following a few, tested principles has helped us thrive in this highly competitive environment –
These principles are:

1. You can’t argue with success

We keep expanding, and we’re very attentive to what our clients say. Our clients spend long hours on the water, and they demand a system that’s robust, comfortable, and works perfectly in all circumstances, so this is what we offer them.

2. Simplicity rules

Nothing beats simplicity in design, and since our kayaks beat any other kayak in terms of functionality, there is no real demand from us to add accessories and detail to what we offer.

3. What’s best for the client is best for us

We used to offer anchors, stake-out poles, paddle clips, a variety of deck mounted rod holders, and even more paddles, until we reached the conclusion that our clients are best served when they buy such accessories in fishing and boating stores after they got the kayak from us, and know exactly which accessories they actually need. We may be losing a few dollars on each sale, but at least we know that our clients face a better choice than what we could have possibly offered them, and they’re not pushed to buy products they might not necessarily need, or may not be the best choice for them.

4. Focus on what you do best

Our clients consider the W kayak to be the world’s best fishing kayak (see customer reviews > ). Clients who’ve fished out of other craft including motorboats consider the W to be the world’s best personal fishing craft. Our recently introduced motorized W kayak successfully competes against small motorboats (see: http://microskiff.us ). This is to say that we keep leading in true, substantial and meaningful innovation, because that’s what we focus on.