Tag Archive: rainbow trout

The Pursuit of Kokanee begins… with Trout

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

I will confess I am addicted to kokanee. They are a land locked sockeye salmon and IMHO are the best tasting fresh water salmonid. They are a challenge to catch in that they are very picky. The right color that they will bite on will change from hour to hour, so you have to have an arsenal ready when you go out. They can even get picky over how you flavor your corn. White shoepeg corn is the preferred bait, however, some add tuna oil, shrimp oil, even garlic. One day they will like one thing and the next day in the same lake, they will hit something else! In addition, they are very temperature selective, and will school at very specific depths.

It is early yet but they are starting to be caught at American Lake in Washington. I had yesterday off so I loaded up the Wavewalk W500 NWDR. The NWDR (Northwest Downriggin) is our favorite (and most popular) way to rig the W500 to turn these kayaks into fishing beasts. The downrigger (basically a weight with its own reel) allows for precise depth control. With the two front rod holders I am able to fish two lines at very different depths and the rocketlaunchers in the back hold the net and the Gopro. Because it is early the fish are very near the surface so I had one line clipped in at 19feet and the other I was just trolling on the surface. This was in 80-90 feet of water. This is a big lake and wind and waves can come up, but in the Wavewalk I am not concerned. I was trolling (.8 to 1.5 mph) all day from 6:30 am until I got back to the ramp at 2pm in a variable 5-10 mph wind and had no problems whatsoever.

Unfortunately I was not able to locate any kokanee yesterday. But the trout saved the day by being very willing and hungry. I released them at the beginning of the day, but after realizing that the kokanee were not going to bite what I had brought I decided to take what I was given and have something to take home for dinner. I ended the day with my 5 trout limit of 1 cutthroat trout and 4 rainbows. I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the meat!

Fun to be fishing again.

American Lake Map

cutthroat-trout-and-rainbow-trout

cutthroat-trout-and-rainbow-trout - cooked and served

 

More kayak rigging, fishing and bow duck hunting with Chris »

Paddling Billingsley Creek, Idaho

By Sid Perry

Took the Wavewalk out on a crystal clear spring fed stream through marshland.  Inaccessible by land this one of the applications I had been dreaming of!  Home to Rainbows and Browns.

The Thousand Springs region flows at 58 degrees year round perfect for trout.  The majority of farm raised trout in the U.S. comes from here.
 Billingsley Creek Idaho
Fishing Billingsley Creek in a kayak

It’s even more fun when you’re the only one catching fish, by Bill Davenport

Well, they’re not striped bass, but it sure is good to get out in the “W”. The fresh water guys were all agog at the Wavewalk. “Is it tippy?” is the most common question. No, no, no is the answer. It’s even more fun when you’re the only one catching fish.

Bill

trout-caught-on-fly

trout-caught-on-fly

trout-caught-on-fly-new-england


More kayak fly fishing and hunting with Bill >

W Kayak Fly Fishing the Norfork River, the Jewel of the Ozarks, Arkansas, By Rickey Kauerz

Headed out at 5:45 AM, hoping to beat the expected 108 degree temperatures.
We are fishing the Norfork River, a small but storied tailwater beginning at the base of the Norfork Dam and ending four and one half miles later at the confluence with the White at the little town of Norfork, Arkansas. The dam’s two generators are shut down, and the river is extremely low, gin clear but cool. These conditions require a specialized floatation tool, the Wavewalk, very thin tippets, and long casts with pinhead size flies, size 18 and 20.
The fish are easily spooked, and getting to them requires traversing eight shoal areas, that dissect the stream and limit access. Without a craft capable of moving well through skinny water, light enough to be manhandled, and tough enough to be dragged through rocky terrain, one simply fishes the public areas, does a lot of wading on slippery rocks, or fishes somewhere else.

My “Personal Trout Assault Vehicle” allowed such a trip and it paid off handsomely with many fine rainbow, aggressive browns, and resplendent cutthroat trout being brought to hand during our six hour day.

My paddling skills are improving, and my ability to read the fast water allowed me to have to exit the vessel less frequently, remembering that I test the recommended single occupancy of our vessel. My much lighter companion rarely if ever had to push off, but did manage to nail a large rock in a swift shoal and stick. He jumped out, the boat eased off, and he reentered, hardly deterred.

This kayak gives me access to water that before would have not been available to me. That’s why I fish in a kayak, my trout assault vehicle.

Rickey

fishing kayak on the Norfolk river, Ozarks, Arkansas

Fly fisherman standing in the river, next to his kayak, in the pouring rain

fly fisherman showing rainbow trout caught in his fishing kayak, Ozark, AR

fly fisherman fishing out of his fishing kayak, Arkansas

Arkansas Sunday Lazy Summer Day Kayak Fly Fishing For Trout, By Rickey Kauerz

Boating has always been in my blood, and it still is. Sailed several oceans, fished a whole lot of rivers, and the Gulf of Mexico on all kinds and sizes of boats.
Found a new way to enjoy my family, and still not have them dependent on me to start the boat, work the oars, or even tote the cold beer. We go kayaking on crystal clear, 60 degree water on near 100 degree days.
Was joined today by a new W kayak owner. He boarded from the dock, worked on a few practice strokes and maneuvers, practiced starting and stopping, stood up and balanced the boat, then headed out up river, all the while whacking the heck out of some nice rainbows.
We watched him lift the rod time after time, resting the paddle on his knees, then gently releasing his briefly captured bows to return home. He was all grins, heading for a nap, and vowing to head back out this afternoon.
My wife showed off, jumping onto her boat, paddling a mile upstream standing up, and then slowly drifting the river, fly rod in hand.
A big pack of sit on fisherman passed going downstream as we paddled upstream. They stared, careened, and finally paddled over to ask what the heck those were. “Those look pretty stable”, one said, so I stood up, all 6’4 275 pounds of me…
Rickey

fly fishing kayaks on river in Arkansas

kayak fly angler paddling standing in stand up fishing kayak

fishing kayak lineup - Arkansas