Tag Archive: ocean

Fishing in the ocean is practiced by some kayak anglers, although they rarely venture to distant fishing grounds, but prefer to fish in protected areas such as bays and estuaries. This is due mainly to the fact that human powered fishing vessels such as kayaks are no match for ocean currents, wind and waves, and neither are electric trolling motors.

Seaworthiness: Driving the Wavewalk S4 in 3-5 ft waves

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

 


Larry offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Wavewalk S4 first sea trial on windy day, with 5 HP outboard motor, Key Largo. Video and review

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

Some thoughts about the Wavewalk S4

 

Beautiful lines!  It may be the Cadillac of kayaks but it looks like a seagoing Corvette.  Is it a high performance motor yak or a portable runabout?
Super stable.  Because it looks so seaworthy, most other powerboats do not slow up when passing port to port.  No problem.  The S4 slides through wakes easily without leaving planing mode.
It seems to run a little faster than the W700 with the same motor.  I believe the wider hulls act like a pair of skis to help the boat skim across the water.  Handling tiller, camera, and a GPS at one time is beyond my skill set.
Tracking through turns while planing is wonderful.  The boat’s stern does not slide like many skiffs do.
The S4 is so easy to spin your body to face the outboard motor because the hulls are so wide.  You can keep your feet inside the vessel.
Also, the S4 is the perfect vessel for folks who are tired of maintaining their leaky inflatable tenders.  Or, people who want a lifeboat that can be used for shade or transport, too.
I still think the W700 is the boat that does it all, but the S4 is the boat that does it all, and more!

The video shows 15-20 knot wind close chop.  No problem.  Try paddling against this.

Larry J.

 

P.S. – This boat could make a run from South Florida to Bimini.  But, for the time being, I will be staying in waters managed by our Country.

 

 

 

Wavewalk S4 in gray with 5 HP Nissan (Tohatsu) outboard motor. Photo shot on the mother ship.


Larry also offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Fishing in Key Largo, Florida

Captain Larry Jarboe, of Key Largo, Florida, is Wavewalk’s authorized dealer for south Florida.
He recently retired from his business in Maryland, and moved to live in Key Largo permanently, where he’s developing a diverse business that includes commercial fishing, reselling Wavewalk kayaks and boats, and guided fishing tours offshore, at the reef, in the mangroves, and in the nearby everglades.

Here is an ocean fishing video shot on board Larry’s mother ship –

Larry’s website: floridafishingkayaks.com

In the beginning…

I wonder, how many of you have watched this old video?

I thought I’d re-post it on the occasion of it reaching 50,000 views. This sounds like a lot, but we posted in 9 years ago, in 2007.
The boat seen here is the original W300, before the modification we did in 2008.
The paddler is me, but I looked much better back then, and I was in better shape too 🙂

Back then I was still focused on the surf-play market… 😮 and good people like Gary Rankel, Jeff McGovern and Rox were trying to explain to me the advantages of the Wavewalk design for fishing 😀

The W300 was 10’4″ long and 25″ wide (this is not a typo). Unbelievably, Jeff and I managed to paddle one of these tiny kayaks in tandem 😀 (Jeff is bigger than me), and an Englishman named Jim McGilvray outfitted his with a 2.5 hp Suzuki outboard (and DIY outriggers).

Time goes by, and we’re not getting any younger, but at least our boats get better 🙂

Keeping the cockpit of your Wavewalk dry at sea

When you paddle your Wavewalk in waves without covering the front end of its cockpit, some spray may get inside, especially if you paddle through big surf. The water is drained to the bottom of the hulls, and it flows backwards to the rear part of the hull tips. Altogether, this is rather insignificant.

When you drive a motorized Wavewalk in the ocean for a long time, at high speed and through waves, your boat generates more spray, and breaking waves can result in more water getting into the cockpit. A Spray Shield works to minimize intake from the front, but not from the sides. Some water may accumulate on the bottom of the hulls, at the rear end of the boat. A few gallons of water would be unnoticed, but having effective means to remove any amount of water at any time is highly recommended, simply because stuff happens, and you’d better be well prepared for any case.

Comparing different solutions

1. One-way valves

Many motorboats and sailing boats feature one-way valves at the rear end of their hulls. When the boat moves in the water at high speed, the low pressure behind its stern causes the valve to open, and pulls out the water that accumulated at the bottom of the hull, namely the bilge.
A hull outfitted with such a valve is called ‘self bailing’.
Needless to say that SOT kayaks described by their manufacturers as “self bailing” are not, and the misuse of this term is misleading.

After much consideration, we decided not to outfit the hulls of the Wavewalk with such valves, for two reasons, which are:

  • Unlike big motorboats, a Wavewalk can be dragged on the ground and over rocks, and this might damage the valves.
  • One-way valves can get jammed, and since the Wavewalk often goes in shallow water that’s mixed with sand and mud, and where vegetation can be abundant, the possibility of such malfunction cannot be disregarded.

2. Electric bilge pump

Battery recharged on board –
Some small outboard gas motors (e.g. Tohatsu, starting at 4 HP) offer the option to add an alternator (electric current generator) and an AC to DC converter. Thus, the motor continuously produces an electric current that can charge a battery that would power an electric bilge pump and/or an electric trolling motor.
This solution sounds perfect – just press or turn an electric switch, and bail the water out. And if you get an automatic pump, you don’t even have to remember to activate it.
But a closer look at the details of this solution revels some problems:

  • Cost – The combined cost of an alternator and converter is around $450. The cost of a battery and an electric bilge pump would bring the total cost of this solution to over $500. It may not be a prohibitive price, but it’s still a considerable sum in the context of a Wavewalk boat.
  • Vulnerability – Keeping a battery and electric pump somewhere in your Wavewalk may not be enough, and you’d need to secure both, so that in case of an accident they would remain inside the cockpit and be fully operational when needed the most. This could prove to be somehow hard to achieve.

Battery not rechargeable on board-
An electric bilge pump powered by a battery that isn’t being continuously charged makes sense, because unlike propelling the boat, pumping a few gallons of water out of its hulls require little power.
The downside of this simple solution is having to remember to charge the battery before each motorized trip offshore, and the possibility that in case of an accident the system could stop working.

3. Hand bucket

Simply a square bucket with a handle (or without one) that fits into a Wavewalk hull, and used as a bilge bucket.
It works, but only in case there is a lot of water in the hull, namely that the water is deep enough, and the user faces the water. But such a scenario is extremely unlikely, and in a typical case only a small quantity of water may accumulate at the bottom of the rear end of the hulls, that is far behind the driver.
This said, it wouldn’t hurt to have a bucket on board, as an addition to the solution that we recommend, which is:

4. Hand pump

A 36″ long, lightweight hand pump costs $29 at Lowe’s.
It allows to pump water from the rear end of the hulls while the user sits facing forward. This is a major advantage, ergonomically speaking, and in simple terms of convenience.
The pump provides a sturdy, simple, and easy to operate solution that you can count on. The piston is lubricated by the water itself, and this makes pumping easy. Capacity wise, four strokes bail out one gallon, and since it’s hard to imagine having to bail out more than a few gallons at a time, the effort required is almost negligible.
The pump features a simple filter at its end, and this prevents it from getting jammed.
If there is a perfect solution, we think this is it.

Manual bilge pump for fishing kayak 36 inch

Manual bilge pump, 36″ long