Tag Archive: launching

Wide wheels for Wavewalk S4 motor kayak skiff

I live close to the water, and I need to transport my motorized Wavewalk S4 over mildly rough terrain, and a sandy beach. The outboard motor I use is a 6 HP Tohatsu that weighs close to 60 lbs, so carrying it by hand is not easy.
Therefore, I had to make a trolley that features wheels that are bother high and wide. The trolley also needed to be transported on board the S4 without taking too much space.

I made a simple wheel cart from a pair of 13″ high and 6.5″ wide flat-free (non inflatable) wheels, and 3/4″ stainless steel tube mounted on a 1/2″ thick plywood board. This structure is attached to the S4 by means of straps.
The plywood board features a small wooden extension in its center. This extension fits in the first, widest slot in the S4’s front deck, and it allows to easily attach the wheel cart vertically, by means of a single shock cord (bungee).

Launching with this trolley is easy, and so is getting the wheels under the kayak after beaching.

 

The plywood is coated with two layers of urethane that protect it from the water.

 

Pulling is done either by holding one of the two molded-in front carry handles, or a strap attached to them.

 

Since these wheels are, big, another thing that this wheel cart offers is to run the outboard motor in a bin filled with freshwater, in order to rinse the salt out of it. This way, the motor can stay attached to the boat, and be clean of the salt.

This setup is enough to let the motor run in freshwater for a few minutes

I guess some readers may ask if this wheel cart offers the front passenger some protection from spray when the S4 moves in waves, and the answer is that it does offer a little protection compared to having nothing there.

Light trailer for my Wavewalk S4, and sunset ride video

By Fin Gold

North Carolina

I usually keep my Wavewalk S4 on my dock so I can use it right there. But sometimes, we like to explore other areas. I don’t have a truck to transport it, so I decided to convert an old sailboat trailer into a Wavewalk S4 trailer.

All it took was some treated 2×6 and 2×4 boards, some U-bolts, and some ceramic deck screws.
I started with the trailer for a [brand name] sailing catamaran that I don’t use.
I’ve never trailered that boat.
The first step was to attach two 2×6 boards each with a U-bolt on the front and the back. On top of those, I screwed five 2×6 cross-boards so they support the boat from underneath all the way from front to back. Then I added 2×4 boards on both of the outside edges to provide an outer groove for the S4 to sit inside. A set of rollers from the sailboat trailer act as guides to align the inner hull of the S4.

The result? A very light but stable platform to pull my Wavewalk S4. When we get to the boat ramp we just back it down the ramp and the S4 slides off the trailer with an easy push. You should have seen the faces of the big boat owners at the ramp when I launched my boat with one finger!

The key to trailering the boat is to make sure it is tied down securely in the front and the back so that it doesn’t slide forward or backwards. I also have two lines over the top of the boat to hold it down, but be
careful not to over-tighten these and compress the hull. Also, remember to tilt the motor up if you have one so it doesn’t hit the ground as you trailer it.

Having a homemade trailer can extend the range of your Wavewalk adventures and save the hassle of loading it in or on top of your vehicle. All it takes is a used trailer and some treated boards!

 

More from Fin »

Wavewalk S4 skiff – Launch anywhere you want (demo movie)

This demo movie shows one person downloading a Wavewalk S4 from a vehicle’s roof rack, and carrying it from the parking space down to a rocky beach that we chose as a location for shooting video just because launching any other skiff from there would have been impossible.

 

 

S4 wheel cart to carry on board

Wavewalk’s motto Launch, Go, Fish and Beach Anywhere is a reality for many Wavewalk owners.

Carrying a Wavewalk 500 or 700 just by dragging it on the ground anywhere is easy, and it’s feasible even with a 6 HP outboard motor attached to the kayak, as we demonstrated in this movie »

However, the S4 being heavier than the W500 and W700, we thought it would be nice to have a wheel cart for it, for when we have the 59 lbs 6 HP outboard motor attached to it, and we want to launch and beach in difficult spots, namely beaches that require carrying the boat over asphalt or on difficult terrain, especially steep and rocky slopes. The heavier the fishing, diving or camping gear carried on board the S4 skiff kayak, the more justified is the use of a wheel cart to carry it.

While most 38″ wide canoe trolleys would have fit this requirement, we wanted a wheel cart that we could store on board, inside one of the hulls, so we designed one –

 

Wheel cart stored on board the S4, in the bow

 

We outfitted the wheel cart with a folding leg that assures that the cart will be in the right angle to receive the boat.

 

The wheel cart is positioned to receive the S4

 

S4 wheel cart with its leg deployed, ready to have the kayak loaded onto it

 

Underside of the wheel cart, with the positioning leg folded in

 

Loading the boat is done simply by pulling it onto the wheel cart. The user can decide where they prefer to have the wheel cart located relatively to the boat. A boat with a heavy motor attached to it would require the wheel cart to be located further towards the stern.

It’s possible to upload the boat on this wheel cart from the bow or from the stern, depending on circumstances. Uploading from the stern makes it easier to place the close to the stern, which puts the boat in a good position for mounting the motor on it, as well as for carrying it with the motor attached to it.

 

S4 kayak loaded on the wheel cart and secured with two straps

 

When stored on board, this wheel cart protrudes into the front part of the cockpit, and this could restrict the space available for a second passenger. In such case, this wheel cart can be attached on top of the front deck, and stored under it if one of the passengers wants to stand on the deck and use it as a casting platform.

This wheel cart is not a product that we offer for sale

 

Some tech specs –

The 38″ long and 6″ wide horizontal main board is made from 3/4″ plywood, and so is the narrow reinforcement beam under it.
All wooden parts are coated with urethane.
We covered with Goop all the screws in the L brackets that could come in contact with the underside of the hulls.
The vertical side boards are made from 1/2″ plywood.
The wheels are 7″ in diameter.
The axles are made from a standard 3 ft long 1/2″ diameter steel tube cut in two.

 


Modifications

1.   Front lower corners cut away to enable better performance over rugged terrain, such as rocks, roots, etc.