Tag Archive: launching

Boat for waterfront property

What is the best boat for a waterfront property?

Waterfront properties differ from each other, and so do boats, so the answer depends on a multitude of factors including –

Location of the property

Does the property border the ocean, a big lake, a small lake, a pond or a river?
Is the water adjacent to the property deep or shallow?
If the property borders the ocean, how strong are the tides there?
Is it a beachfront property, or does it border a canal, or a cove?
Are waves and currents too strong there?

Physical attributes of the property and access to the water

Does the property feature a beach or a dock, or both?
Is it necessary to carry the boat from the house or the boat shed to the water and back?
Is the water at the beach very shallow, and does it feature rocks, and/or vegetation?

Docking

Is the dock high or low above the water?
Is it a permanent or a floating structure?

Boat size and type

Some boats are too big, and they draft too much to be docked close to shore. These boats may be moored close enough, but then they require a small service boat, namely a boat tender to allow transportation of passengers and goods from shore and back.
Other vessels, such as canoes, SOT kayaks and sit-in kayaks, don’t offer much as far as boating goes, and they are not comfortable.
Jon boats and skiffs work well on flat water, and they can go in relatively shallow water. However, they are not seaworthy, and they are not useful in water where abundant vegetation grows, unless they are outfitted with a surface drive (mud motor). These flat bottomed boats are usually too wide for their users to paddle them effectively over any meaningful distance.
Inflatable dinghies are typically more seaworthy than Jon boats and skiffs, but they are notoriously uncomfortable, and similarly, they don’t paddle well. Most anglers would be reluctant to fish out of an inflatable boat, because fishing hooks can easily perforate their walls.
Pontoon boats work well on flat water, but despite their extreme stability, they are not comfortable in choppy water.
Big motorboats are fun, and they are more seaworthy than small boats, but they draft too much to go in shallow water, they won’t go in water with vegetation, and there is no way to paddle them, even over very short distances.
In general, the bigger the boat the harder it is to carry it over land, and the more its owners depend on docks. Needless to say that maintaining a large size boat is not cheap, even if it’s possible to moor or dock it next to your property.

Could this boat fit your waterfront property needs?

Comfortable, seaworthy, lightweight, extremely versatile, no maintenance: The S4

The main advantages of the Wavewalk S4  as a boat for a waterfront property are:

  1. It is lightweight and portable – barely 100 lbs without the motor. This means that you don’t necessarily need a dock to launch and beach it, and if needed, you can haul it on top of your dock. Moreover, being a car-top boat makes it available for you to take on trips to other places, even without a trailer.
  2. It’s a kayak, and it paddles well as such, and as a canoe.
  3. Very shallow draft, even with a motor. For many anglers and paddlers, this feature means everything.
  4. It’s seaworthy – more than Jon boats and most micro skiffs.
  5. It’s fast – 17 mph sustained with a powerful outboard motor.
  6. It’s an all-terrain boat that you can outfit with a surface drive (mud motor)
  7. It’s comfortable and back-pain free, thanks to its saddle seat that its passengers ride similarly to the way you ride the saddle of high performance personal watercraft (jet-ski), all-terrain vehicles (ATV), and snowmobiles.
  8. It’s extremely stable – more than Jon boats and micro skiffs of similar size, which makes it great for fishing. It even features a front deck for casting.
  9. Plenty of storage space and good carrying capacity – The S4 can carry a payload of 650 lbs, which means a powerful portable outboard motor and three passengers. The on board storage space it provides is equivalent to the storage space offered by good size skiffs and Jon boats.
  10. It’s durable, thanks to the fact that it’s rotomolded from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), and you can carry and launch it over rocks.

Click images to enlarge –

Wide wheels for Wavewalk S4 motor kayak skiff

I live close to the water, and I need to transport my motorized Wavewalk S4 over mildly rough terrain, and a sandy beach. The outboard motor I use is a 6 HP Tohatsu that weighs close to 60 lbs, so carrying it by hand is not easy.
Therefore, I had to make a trolley that features wheels that are bother high and wide. The trolley also needed to be transported on board the S4 without taking too much space.

I made a simple wheel cart from a pair of 13″ high and 6.5″ wide flat-free (non inflatable) wheels, and 3/4″ stainless steel tube mounted on a 1/2″ thick plywood board. This structure is attached to the S4 by means of straps.
The plywood board features a small wooden extension in its center. This extension fits in the first, widest slot in the S4’s front deck, and it allows to easily attach the wheel cart vertically, by means of a single shock cord (bungee).

Launching with this trolley is easy, and so is getting the wheels under the kayak after beaching.

 

The plywood is coated with two layers of urethane that protect it from the water.

 

Pulling is done either by holding one of the two molded-in front carry handles, or a strap attached to them.

 

Since these wheels are, big, another thing that this wheel cart offers is to run the outboard motor in a bin filled with freshwater, in order to rinse the salt out of it. This way, the motor can stay attached to the boat, and be clean of the salt.

This setup is enough to let the motor run in freshwater for a few minutes

I guess some readers may ask if this wheel cart offers the front passenger some protection from spray when the S4 moves in waves, and the answer is that it does offer a little protection compared to having nothing there.

Light trailer for my Wavewalk S4, and sunset ride video

By Fin Gold

North Carolina

I usually keep my Wavewalk S4 on my dock so I can use it right there. But sometimes, we like to explore other areas. I don’t have a truck to transport it, so I decided to convert an old sailboat trailer into a Wavewalk S4 trailer.

All it took was some treated 2×6 and 2×4 boards, some U-bolts, and some ceramic deck screws.
I started with the trailer for a [brand name] sailing catamaran that I don’t use.
I’ve never trailered that boat.
The first step was to attach two 2×6 boards each with a U-bolt on the front and the back. On top of those, I screwed five 2×6 cross-boards so they support the boat from underneath all the way from front to back. Then I added 2×4 boards on both of the outside edges to provide an outer groove for the S4 to sit inside. A set of rollers from the sailboat trailer act as guides to align the inner hull of the S4.

The result? A very light but stable platform to pull my Wavewalk S4. When we get to the boat ramp we just back it down the ramp and the S4 slides off the trailer with an easy push. You should have seen the faces of the big boat owners at the ramp when I launched my boat with one finger!

The key to trailering the boat is to make sure it is tied down securely in the front and the back so that it doesn’t slide forward or backwards. I also have two lines over the top of the boat to hold it down, but be
careful not to over-tighten these and compress the hull. Also, remember to tilt the motor up if you have one so it doesn’t hit the ground as you trailer it.

Having a homemade trailer can extend the range of your Wavewalk adventures and save the hassle of loading it in or on top of your vehicle. All it takes is a used trailer and some treated boards!

 

More from Fin »

Wavewalk S4 skiff – Launch anywhere you want (demo movie)

This demo movie shows one person downloading a Wavewalk S4 from a vehicle’s roof rack, and carrying it from the parking space down to a rocky beach that we chose as a location for shooting video just because launching any other skiff from there would have been impossible.