Tag Archive: stability

Shooting a ringneck duck out of a Wavewalk 700

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

 

Well for the last month I have suffered through a horrible pinched nerve in my neck. This has prevented me from being out in the Wavewalk where I try and get at least 3-4 times a month during the fishing and hunting seasons. Basically every month but Feb. and the beginning of March which is effectively known as remodel season. After working diligently on rehab I was able to return to duck hunting this last week. The Wavewalks are our go to boat when it comes to hunting. We can put 3 dozen deeks, shotgun, camo net, hunting box, thermos and our selves in a W700 and paddle it anywhere we need to go. Then it not only serves as transportation but also as the boat for retrieving. That is where the stability is so important. You sometimes have to dispatch cripples (shoot them) from the kayak. As the video shows this can sometimes get a bit sporty. Wavewalk handles it fine.

The video is a bit of fun we had with a GoPro. If you don’t like hunting you won’t want to watch it. We enjoy the sport of duck hunting and the wonderful food it provides.

We were having a hard time keeping those ringnecks on the water.  They are tough birds.  We would smack them and then by the time we could get out to them they would recover and fly off!  Diver ducks are really tough birds.  Probably because they have very thick down and feathers to protect from the water.
We had a great time.

Good to be back in the saddle again.

 

 

 

More kayak rigging, fishing and bow duck hunting with Chris »

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers’ club outing in dense fog

By Gary Rankel

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers
My kayak angler group ran into a morning of dense fog at Ozello 2 days ago.
Art Myjak, who is still recovering from a stroke he had 2 years ago, was good to go in his Wavewalk 500. He is still a bit unsteady and don’t think he would do real well in a more traditional yak.
Fortunately, I asked the new guys in our club to bring a VHF radio with them so we could maintain contact. They were invaluable in the fog.

 

More fishing with Gary »

Duck boat for two hunters – Wavewalk 700

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

Well I haven’t sent in a report lately because I have been deer hunting and the Wavewalks were not involved. But now it is on to ducks and the Wavewalks are an essential part of our arsenal.
We have long paddles in strong currents and in rough weather and the Wavewalk handles it just fine!
The W700 is particularly good as a duck boat. Two hunters can carry their gear and tandem paddling makes the currents no big deal.

On this trip we were able to use the outgoing tide as well as the current from a river to make the trip back home easy. According to the GPS we were doing 7-8 mph paddling with the current.

I have designed a blind for the boat but have yet to finish building it.

Most of the time the Wavewalks are only used as transportation. We are also able to transport 3 dozen deeks, two hunters, shooting boxes, guns, camo nets, all in the W700!

Enjoying the stability and versatility of the these kayaks.

Here are a few pictures from our latest duck hunt.

double

Double

drake-crush

Drake crush

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Ducks in the deeks

wigeon-down

Wigeon down

 

More kayak rigging, fishing and duck hunting with Chris »

Wavewalk 700 review and dock launching system

By Jeff Goldstein

New York

I added bridles to the front and rear of each boat to ease launching.
I bring the Wavewalk to the ladder, hold the rope around the ladder and climb down. The boat is so stable that it’s very easy for me to get in and out without any fear of tipping.
I had my son and son in law in the boat, both close to 240lbs each.

Attached are photos of how I set up my dock.
I purchased the roller which is about 5′ long from a dock roller company called Ryano. The hardware is all galvanized and the roller is 6″ diameter. I got 20′ long Python locks (made by Master Lock) and screwed a stainless eye hook into each pole which are 8′ on center apart.
The cable lock secures the Wavewalk so it can’t move in the wind and is theft resistant.

 

Wavewalk-700-overturned-on-a-dock

“Combat” and “Sunshine” W700 on the dock

 

dock-pillar

 

roll-for-easy-launching-of-kayaks-from-dock

 

Wavewalk-700-overturned-on-a-launching-dock

 

Wavewalk-700-ready-for-launching-from-dock

Wavewalk® RHIB

Wavewalk no longer offers this configuration as shown here.
Since we now offer 12 ft long (7.25″ diameter) detachable inflatable flotation tubes as part of the W700 RIB , we offer only boats with one pair of regular size tubes (5 ft long / 6.5″ diameter) or one pair of the XL tubes (12 ft long / 7.25″ diameter).
We left this page and the RHIB configuration here in order to show yet another configuration that’s possible.

 

Wavewalk® RHIB – Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat

Before we go any further, the answer to your question is: -“Yes! This boat is great for fishing, for one or two anglers, once you detach the front pair of inflatable tubes, or both pairs, which takes less an a minute.”
In other words, the RHIB is simply a Wavewalk® 700 Z model that features an additional pair of inflatable tubes attached in the front.
And now that things are a bit clearer, let’s watch this video –
Tip: For best quality set your YouTube viewer to 1080 p HD

Why two pairs of inflatable tubes?

Good question! In this video, the front inflatable tubes touch the water on rare occasions, and when they do, they don’t seem to do much. This is because their purpose is to serve as secondary flotation, in addition to the saddle and the rear inflatable tubes.
In extreme cases, if the boat tilts very strongly on its side, these extra tubes could help prevent it from flipping. They can also help when the boat goes in bigger waves, since they add buoyancy to the bow, which allows the boat to go over the wave instead of through it. This can help prevent spray from getting into the boat, and make the ride less bumpy.
Extra flotation on both sides of the bow can be useful in other cases, such as when the boat is used for work or rescue, when divers climb on board from the water, and when heavy crab traps are hauled in.

What if I don’t want to use these extra inflatable tubes?

Each tube is attached to the boat with two carabiners, and it takes just seconds to detach it. It can be easily stored in the boat while still inflated, and both inflating and deflating it takes seconds, thanks to a user-friendly, wide (1.25″ diameter) inflation valve that saves you the need for a pump.

And what about that transparent spray shield?

The spray shield is attached to the boat with a bungee cord and two hooks. It takes a few seconds to attach or detach it, and once it’s not attached it’s just a flat, lightweight, flexible sheet of plastic that hardly takes any space, and can be easily stored inside one of the boat’s hulls.

What’s a RHIB?

RHIB is the acronym for Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat, also known as RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat).
These motorboats are designed for extra stability and speed, and they come in various sizes. The smaller ones are motorized dinghies that can take a small number of passengers through rough water.
RHIB are very popular, and used in a wide range of applications, such as rescue, offshore work, tending bigger boats, diving, etc.
Anglers prefer not to fish out of inflatable boats because of the fishing hooks… but this is not an issue with Wavewalk’s RHIB, since its inflatable tubes can be removed instantly.

What’s special about the Wavewalk® RHIB?

Compared to rigid-inflatable dinghies of its size the Wavewalk® is –

  1. More stable: It features a catamaran hull, and a saddle that makes it easier for the driver and passenger/s to balance themselves.
  2. Easier to car-top: Its rigid hull weighs just 80 lbs, and it’s 12’10” (391 cm) long, which makes it easy to lean on the vehicle’s roof before sliding the boat upward.
  3. More versatile: Without the front pair of inflatable tubes it’s a Wavewalk® 700 Z model, which is a great fishing boat for one or two anglers. Without inflatable tubes it’s a nifty motorboat that paddles well, and without the motor it’s hands down the world’s best fishing and touring kayak.
  4. Faster: Videos of this RHIB and other W700 configurations show the unique Wavewalk ‘signature’ in the water – Practically no wake in the front, and a very slender wake at the stern. In this sense, this wake reminds a torpedo moving in the water, and not a boat, especially not a RHIB. Being typically wide and designed to plane, RHIBs leave a huge wake behind them, a sign of the great amount of power used to propel them.
  5. More comfortable: Some luxury small RHIBs feature forward facing seats or benches, and their driver can steer by means of a steering wheel or a joystick. But most small RHIBs offer just basic amenities, and their driver sits on their side, or on the side of the motor, next to the tiller, or on a bench in front of it. All these locations are sub-optimal in ergonomic terms and as far as driving is concerned, since they demand from the driver to face sideways, or drive with their arm stretched backward. Food for thought – Does any other vehicle require from its driver to sit in any of these awkward postures?… In contrast, Wavewalk’s RHIB offers its driver to ride a comfortable saddle and face forward, as they would in a personal watercraft (PWC) a.k.a.  jet-ski, an all terrain vehicle (ATV), or a snowmobile, which are vehicles designed for high performance in both tough conditions and at high speeds. Wavewalk’s RHIB is steered with a supersized joystick that’s intuitive to use and works perfectly when the driver sits or stands, without any adaptation required. This plug-in joystick and steering system require no installation, and it takes a few seconds to attach or detach it. The driver or the W-RHIB can start the motor in the most comfortable position, namely while facing backward, and once the motor is running, they can easily and swiftly turn around and face forward, as demonstrated in the video.