Tag Archive: kayak injury

Articles

 

This list features links to over a hundred articles published on our website since 2004.
Generally, the newest articles feature at the top of this list, and the oldest ones at the bottom of this page.

Most of these articles offer ‘How To’ or technical info on subjects related to stability, paddling, outfitting, fishing, rigging, motorizing, choosing a kayak or a motor, etc.
Other articles are about subjects ranging from kayak and boat design to skiffs, market trends, and ergonomics.

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List of articles

 

  1. Wavewalk S4 review by its own designer
  2. The world’s fastest kayak
  3. 10 good reasons to motorize your kayak
  4. Portable boats
  5. The smallest and greatest skiff
  6. Developments in Motorized Kayaks
  7. Wakes are fun?
  8. How much HP for my S4 skiff’s outboard motor?
  9. Jon Boat Stability vs. Wavewalk® S4
  10. Testing 15″ short (S) shaft outboard motor performance with Wavewalk kayaks and boats, By Captain Larry Jarboe
  11. How to measure an outboard motor’s propeller shaft length?
  12. Watertight riveting in kayaks and boats
  13. Choosing an outboard motor for your Wavewalk® 700 skiff
  14. Outboard motor propeller shaft length for Wavewalk® fishing kayaks and boats
  15. Aluminum rivets in fishing kayaks and boats
  16. Kayaks and Boats, Kayak vs. Boat
  17. Happy Birthday W700!
  18. Keeping the cockpit of your Wavewalk dry at sea
  19. Personal Catamaran
  20. Paddling in Strong Wind
  21. Outriggers
  22. Pedal drive for my fishing kayak?
  23. Review of my Wavewalk 700
  24. Flats boat or bass boat, or something else?
  25. Steering motorized fishing kayaks and small boats
  26. Boat stability in a kayak
  27. Microskiff
  28. KAYAK TOURING
  29. Paddling 340 Miles in a W500 Kayak, By Clint Harlan
  30. A better two-person fishing boat
  31. Bass fishing in Ontario, By Boyd Smith
  32. Why I became a Wavewalk kayak owner, By Michael Chesloff
  33. Fishing offshore – the next frontier
  34. More is less in your fishing kayak’s cockpit – Too much stuff and too little fishability
  35. The secrets of the SOT kayak’s underside
  36. Wavewalk kayak tracking a plus in strong tidal current, By Art Myjak
  37. Whatever floats your boat – flotation for fishing kayaks
  38. What makes the Wavewalk 500 faster and easier to paddle than other fishing kayaks?
  39. A stable kayak for photography
  40. How effective are outriggers for your fishing kayak’s stability?
  41. Dog on board
  42. Smarter electric motors and Lithium-Ion batteries – A winning combination for kayak fishing, By Gary Thorberg
  43. Ocean Kayak Fishing
  44. Your boat trailer, the abominable fishing-time guzzler
  45. Kayak fishing with disabilities
  46. Motorize your fishing kayak?
  47. About fishing kayak design, innovation, upgrades, accessories, etc.
  48. Storage: How Much Gear Can You Store Inside a Wavewalk 500 Fishing Kayak?
  49. Do Not Overload Your Fishing Kayak
  50. A Fair-Weather Fishing Kayak…
  51. A Brief History Of Kayak Fishing – Past, Present, and Foreseeable Future
  52. Fishing Kayak Stability
  53. About Kayak Fishing In Tandem…
  54. The Hybrid Fishing Kayak – Facts, Hype and Plain Nonsense
  55. Motorizing Your Kayak – Why, How, What Etc…
  56. More About Dangers To Kayakers and Kayak Anglers in Warm, Fresh Water
  57. How to Keep Your W500 Fishing Kayak Cockpit Dry
  58. THE BARGE – A NEW CLASS OF FISHING KAYAKS
  59. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly – Aesthetics and Performance in Fishing Kayak Design
  60. Kayak Fishing As An Extreme Sport
  61. Too Much Storage In A Fishing Kayak…
  62. What Is kayak Back Pain, And What Does It Mean For You?
  63. Paddle vs. Pedal Drive in Fishing Kayaks
  64. Resting in Your Fishing Kayak – Don’t Fall Asleep!
  65. More Storage Than Any Other Kayak: The W500
  66. Lumbar Spine and Kayak Back Pain: Facts
  67. Some Practical Advice About Rigging Your Fishing Kayak
  68. Kayak Fishing Safety: Is It safe To Paddle An Uncomfortable Kayak And Fish From It?
  69. Stretching in Your Kayak to Relief Fatigue and Pain, and Improve Circulation
  70. Stand Up Kayak Fishing and Paddling – For Real
  71. Kayaking Back Pains and Leg Numbness
  72. Fishability – How Fishable Are Kayaks?
  73. How to Save Money When Buying a Fishing Kayak
  74. Rigging Your Wavewalk Kayak With a Milk Crate – Is it Necessary?
  75. Lures for Bass Kayak Fishing, By Roxanne Davis
  76. Range of Motion and Protection From the Fish – Kayak Comparison, By Jeff McGovern
  77. Casting From A W Fishing Kayak Compared To Casting From Sit-In and SOT Fishing Kayaks, By Jeff McGovern
  78. How Effective Can Fishing Kayaks’ Outriggers Be?
  79. What Makes The Wavewalk The Stablest Fishing Kayak
  80. Are SOT Kayaks Safe For Offshore Fishing?
  81. Kayak Fishing Standing – And What If? (Stuff Happens)
  82. About Rudders and Fishing Kayaks
  83. Saltwater Fishing Gear Maintenance, By Jeff McGovern
  84. Kayak Fishing With Children
  85. Stability in Fishing Kayaks – Problems and Solutions
  86. How to Choose a Fishing Kayak That’s Best For You
  87. Back Pain, Good Posture and Kayak Fishing
  88. The Wavewalk Kayak Combat Position For Fighting a Big Fish
  89. Paddling and Kayak Fishing in Cold Water and Weather
  90. Whether paddling or fishing in your kayak, try to stay dry
  91. Fishing Standing in a Kayak
  92. Kayak Fishing in Shallow Water
  93. Common Kayak Fishing Myths, Tales and Hype
  94. Thrust in Electric Trolling Motors for Fishing Kayak
  95. What To Carry On Board Your Fishing Kayak, By Jeff McGovern
  96. Kayak Fishing From the Mounted (Riding) Position
  97. Southern Kayak Fishermen’s Complaints
  98. What Color and Form for My Fishing Kayak?
  99. Headwind and Side Wind – Paddling in Strong Wind Without a Rudder
  100. The Yak Back – What Your Fishing Kayak Shouldn’t Do To You
  101. Getting Trapped Inside a Kayak
  102. Are Sea Kayaks Seaworthy?
  103. Common Kayak Injuries
  104. Clamp Mounted Side Mount For Fishing Kayak Electric Trolling Motor
  105. How to Avoid and Repair Scratches in Your Kayak
  106. Kayak Side Flotation- How it Works and Why Use it
  107. Wheels For Fishing Kayak Transportation
  108. Detachable Flotation For Fishing Kayak
  109. Ergonomics and Biomechanics in Kayaks
  110. Kayak Hydrodynamics, Hydrostatics and Biomechanics As Speed Factors
  111. Fishing Kayak Reviews
  112. The Evolution of the Kayak
  113. Versatility: From Specialized Kayaks to Broad Range, High Performance Kayaks
  114. Mobility: The New Dimension in Kayak Design
  115. Wavewalk Demo Movies

Fully Rigged Fishing kayak and Full Kayak Review, by Gary Johnson, Texas

I am 61, 280lbs, retired, 100% disabled, veteran Navy Officer. I have a very bad back resulting from damage done while I was on active duty. My back has 4 bad disks in the lower end, three bad disks in the neck, and pinched nerves going to my legs. Added to this I suffer from Fibromyalgia. My meds for the most part keep the pain at a semi-manageable level, but the hurt never goes completely away. If I can help some other Vet or civilian with frequent orthopedic pain be able to enjoy kayaking it’s good enough for me.

Rigged fishing kayak, Texas

WaveWalkOne all decked out with the crate attached, the light/flag pole flying, rod holders (2) in place, the paddle holder based on Jeff's Wal-Mart hooks in place and if you will notice sitting on the seat there are three 2 gal containers and three 1 gallon watertight containers that I use for storage up in the hull tips. You will see in another picture a closeup of how I extract the 1 gallon containers which get pushed way up in the tip.

I think it is important to clarify why I am passionate about the WaveWalk W500 Kayak.
I used to be an accredited Canoe instructor, and have taught lots of Boy Scouts how to make a canoe go straight. For me a regular kayak makes “Pain Management” impossible. I have tried conventional kayaks and NONE OF THEM give me the freedom to stretch and move that I require in order to keep my back from cramping up and making fishing pure hell. The W500 was my last hope for a personal watercraft. If it weren’t for the W500, I couldn’t be a kayak owner – my back will not allow me to sit in a regular kayak for more than about 20 minutes.
The W500 allows me to move into positions that relieve the pain from where it is hurting the most and have it hurt somewhere else for a while. I found the ONLY KAYAK AVAILABLE that allows me complete freedom of movement – something none of SITS or SOTS can claim. I will match my W500 up against anything the SITS or SOTS have shown me, especially since I can use the W500 and I CAN’T use the others. It does bother some other yakkers though that I always have easy answers for the problems they are trying to solve…
I think that eventually I will manage to give HOPE to disabled people that Kayaking is not something beyond their capabilities.

Fishing kayak live bait tanks, Texas

My 2 gallon and 1 gallon ciontainers that fit up in the hull tips attached together. To maintain their watertightness I put silicone seal aroung the holes where the rope goes through their sides. To store, the big container pushes the little one up into the tip and to extract it the big one pulls the small one out. In one of the hull tips I don't attach them together as the big container is filled with water and has an aerator for keeping shrimp alive as bait. When I get to where I am going to be fishing I pour the shrimp into a mesh bait bag that hangs over the side. I keep my cell phone, wallet, and anything else that can't possibly get wet in the small one that has no holes drilled in it to ensure it always stays dry.

Before I found the W500, kayaking was beyond my capability. You couldn’t have gotten me in a kayak for a days fishing on a bet. I would have passed on an all-expenses paid fishing trip with a guide who was fishing out of kayaks. I COULD NOT HAVE STOOD THE PAIN. Hurting just isn’t worth it.
In late January through early April the white bass will be running in the rivers near me. Kayakers have a field day getting into water that others can’t get to. I plan on showing the W500 off to many of those guys and will offer free rides. They will be bundled up in their waders and still be getting wet. I plan to entice them with a DRY RIDE.
I promote your product on the net for FUN. Its something I believe in and would like others who have the same problems as I do to have the freedom to participate in kayaking without hurting themselves more.

Fishing kayak rigged with fish finder, Texas

I drilled a 3 inch hole in the third setion of the seat and installed a 2 1/2 tank fitting (the black round fitting) that goes through the poly board that hold the holder for my GPS. My depth finder/Fish Finder is dropped down through this hole and extends into the water beneath the hulls. Since the fish finder has side looking sonar on it too it has to go that deep. When underway I have a piece of 3 inch pvc that goes on top of the fitting and holds the sonar transducer just under the water when I am paddling, thus reducing the drag. The 2 1/2 inch fitting screw tight from underneath and reinforces the seat where I drilled the hole. A second, but no less valuable use for this hole is to run a chain through to lock the kayak into my truck when I am not with it. It keeps the kayak from wandering off if you get my drift.

fishing kayak rigged with fish finder, Texas

GPS mount swung off to the side so I can move up to bow in boat. To exit the boat I would leave it straight and remove the depth finder and set it behind me and just walk off as usual.

The biggest problem I have faced with my W500 is the comments from non-believers. Some of the things they say can be painful if you don’t have a thick hide. They make their comments UNTIL they get on the water with me. I then do things like reversing direction in the kayak and watch their faces. I also make a big deal about stretching and twisting, standing up to show that I am completely free to move as I desire.

stake out pole for kaayk fishing, Texas

My stake out stick. It consists of a 4-8 ft long roller paainting extension pole from Home Depot with a 1 inch pvc T shaped handle on it on the top end and a roller handle (red part) that has had the part you attach the roller to cut off and then the shaft straightened and sharpened on the end. Works great and I attach it to the large carabiner on my anchor trolley.

I needed a stable kayak, that kept me dry (I mean 100% dry except for sweat) and after almost a year’s search finally decided that a WaveWalk W500 was the ticket. You are welcome to come to my home and try mine out on our neighborhood private lake. I offer this, because I had to buy mine sight unseen, untried, acting only on faith of others testimonials and several phone calls to a preacher in Corpus who owns one. The W500 is stable enough to not only stand in, but to paddle standing up. If you get wet in one its your own fault or because you decided to go wading. It has so much storage space that is so accessible that a crate isn’t needed. Unlike conventional kayaks I have a seat that is 6 feet long that I can sit anywhere on. I can stand, bend, twist, do anything I desire and stay in the kayak. Without doubt I feel I made the right choice, and I am however, a completely satisfied customer.

Fishing kayak outfitted with safety light, TX

My flag/360 degree light pole. It's made from 1 1/4 inch pvc in three sections of 18 inches each. The Tektite white 2 led light drops in the top. When storing the pole for transit the pole sections are held in a piece of 4 inch pvc in the crate. I mount the flag/light pole in a 90 degree flush mount rod holder mounted as far back on the Hull tip a possible right next to the flotation foam. To make the 1 1/4 pipe fit into the pole holder I use a decreaser to 1 inch PVC.

I read the Texas kayak fishing boards (texaskayakfishing.com and the kayak section of www.Texasfishingforum.com) and just laugh. “Regular” kayak owners complain about lack of stability, lack of storage space, wet butts and wet feet, etc. An owner of a W500 has NONE of these problems. Take launching for instance – in a regular kayak you wade out half the length of the kayak and then get in – WET already. In a W500 I walk down between the hulls for 2 1/2 feet and step into the cockpit pushing off with the last foot on dry land and have launched completely dry. Landing I do essentially the same. To land I merely slide back in the seat, thus raising the “bow” and paddle or push quite far up onto the beach. I then slide up to the front pinning the hull tips to the beach and walk out between the hull tips – DRY.

Fishing kayak rigged with attachment for stake out pole, Texas

Simple method of just using a carabiner to attach the anchor trolley to the handle and a picture of my rod holders. The BIG red caribiner goes over the stack out stick for anchoring.

Don’t believe the hype you will hear from folks who have other kayaks, and criticize the W500, because they have no idea what they are talking about (99.9% of whom have never even seen a W500 much less paddled one) that the W500 won’t turn, is hard to paddle, won’t track. Phooey on them. I can turn a W500 literally in place using 2 methods they don’t have in their arsenal. IF I need to change direction immediately I just turn around in the kayak (don’t try this in a regular kayak) and paddle the opposite direction OR I slide to the back of the seat lifting the front tips and do a couple of back paddles on the same side of the W500 and pivot in place. Regular turning is no problem either. Anchoring is another problem solved in a W500. A regular kayak MUST have an anchor trolley to be able to keep the anchor in the proper position to keep the kayak from going broadside to waves. The anchor trolley moves the anchor from place to place. In a W500, I can move from the back to the front of the kayak and I can move the anchor with me. I do have an anchor trolley on my W500, but its for MY CONVENIENCE mostly with Drift Socks so I can move the socks in small increments to keep me in position on a drift Quickly so as not to interfere with my fishing.

paddle holders attached to fishing kayak, TexasThe WaveWalk kayak will keep you completely dry (no scuppers for water to enter to soak your butt) both on using the kayak and upon getting in and out of the kayak. The W500 has more storage than I can effectively use (14 cubic feet). I use a crate, not because I have to, but because it allows me to have a convenient place to fly my 360 light and flag from, and a place to keep my anchor and drift sock where it is instantly available should I need it. I use an anchor trolley because it makes the adjustment of where an anchor is located, not because I have to. Unlike those who use a conventional kayak and are largely confined to one place, I have a 6 foot long cockpit seat that allows me free access to the kayak tips on both the bow and stern which are interchangeable since the kayak can be paddled equally well either direction as they are exactly the same. You talk about turning – I can turn on a dime by sliding back to the rear of the seat and giving a couple of back paddles and the W500 will swivel in place. I can reverse direction simply by turning around in the cockpit and paddling the other direction. I don’t need to add flotation as that comes standard in the kayak tips and no it does not use up some of my storage space. Can anyone who has a regular kayak even approximate these features?? The features are as they are, and I will be posting about the merits of the W500 because I believe for the big guy and more importantly for the person who has disabilities that the W500 is the best kayak going.
It is so much easier to throw a cast net when you don’t have to do it from the sitting L position, and it’s so much easier it is to get things from your crate and from the 14 cubic feet of storage in the hull tips, if you can turn completely around like in the cockpit of a W500.

cleat attached to fishing kayak, Texas

My favorite small boat cleat. Its called either a zig zag cleat or a W cleat. I'll go with the W. Very quick and easy to attach lines to and more than one line can be attached to the same cleat.

I did a lot of research before I finally settled on the WaveWalk W500, and I am glad that I can continually point out the things that are HARD OR IMPOSSIBLE from a regular Kayak that are so easy from a WaveWalk. It is most important to me for DISABLED KAYAKERS to know about the only kayak that I can own and actually use. As I have said before, my legs and back will not let me sit in a regular kayak for more than about 30 minutes before I have to get out. The having to get out is true for both paddling or sitting one place fishing.
The other fun and easy stuff like having max storage space, having max stability, ability to throw cast nets, are just gravy, because if you can’t get comfortable in the kayak, then you won’t use it and the subject is moot. IF I had a fishing kayak with the pedal drive I could not use it, and would not use it, because my disabilities keep me from using it. That said, after having a WaveWalk W500, I would still not use a pedal drive kayak even if I could. There are just too many other advantages to the WaveWalk that I would want to take advantage of. Why would I use a kayak with reduced capability and comfort???”
Give me a call or better yet come and paddle my W500,

Gary Johnson

Fishing kayak rigged with a crate, Texas

Looking down into crate. The 4 inch PVC holds the anchor and anchor rope and chain, also a piece for the broken down flag/light pole, and one for a couple of drift socks which are not here yet. One of my 1 gallon size watertight storage containers fits here too.



What Is Kayak Back Pain, and What Does It Mean For You?

Definition of Pain

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.

Pain plays a critical role in our survival and well being, because it motivates us to withdraw from potentially damaging situations, avoid those situations in the future, and protect a damaged body part while it heals.

Pain is usually initiated by stimulation of the peripheral nervous system, that is the nerves in various parts of our body. These nerves are connected through the spinal nerve to our brain, where we become aware of the pain.

The Nerves Involved In Kayak Back Pain, Leg Pain, Etc.

The sciatic nerve is a large nerve fiber that begins in the lower back and runs through the buttock and down the lower limb. It is the longest and widest single nerve in the human body. The sciatic nerve supplies nearly the whole of the skin of the leg, the muscles of the back of the thigh, and those of the leg and foot. It is derived from spinal nerves L4 (in Lumbar vertebra # 4) through S3 (in Sacral vertebra #3) in the lower part of our spine.

Meaning of Back Pain When You’re Kayaking, or Kayak Fishing

Any unpleasant sensation you feel in your body while kayaking or fishing from your kayak, is a sign that something is wrong, so you need to pay attention to it, and do something about it:

Your legs getting numb is a sign that means you should change positions, stretch, get up, and get things in order.

Pain in your legs, or your lower back means something is seriously wrong, and you’re either risking physical damage, or actually causing it just by being seated in the L position, whether you’re paddling, resting, or fishing.

Pain means you need to stop paddling and fishing, and try to ‘unkink’, stretch, stand up, walk, do some physical exercise, etc.,

You shouldn’t ignore pain, because the longer you feel it, the less likely it is that it’s just a warning of a possible damage, and the more likely it is to be either a sign of actual physical damage in the making, or worse – damage that’s already done.

What To Do, And What Not To Do

Paddling and fishing in the L sitting position while you’re feeling back pain is bad for you. By doing it, you’re actively prolonging your healing period, and you may even be increasing the damage in your back. This is especially true if you’re suffering from chronic, frequent, or acute back pain.

When you consult with other kayakers and kayak anglers, or with kayak outfitters, kayak fishing guides or kayak dealers about the pain you feel in your back, some of them might dismiss pain as being unimportant, and complaining about it as ‘unmanly’. Others could even brag about their ability to keep paddling or fishing despite the pain they feel. In our view, anyone telling you to ignore your back pain is being irresponsibly wrong, and you should not listen to them. You’d better listen to what your back is telling you, don’t ignore it, and take it seriously, and you’d better consult your physician.

If you’re advised to take pain killers while you’re kayaking, or kayak fishing, you’re being given a bad advice, since that would double your risk: You could be aggravating the damage already caused to your back, and possibly turning it into severe damage, and on top of this you’ll be increasing likelihood of becoming the victim of a kayaking or fishing accident resulting from numbed senses and slower reactions.  Needless to say that the same is true for drinking alcohol, and for the same reasons, and in some states drinking alcohol while being on board a small boat is illegal, and could get you in a lot of trouble.

Conclusion: You’d better not operate kayaks while suffering from a sore back.

Seeking advice from a physician specializing in back problems, and even from your primary care physician is likely to help you better understand you back problem, avoid aggravating it, and eventually solve it.

What Does The W Kayak Offer To Your Back?

1. Different basic sitting positions:

When you’re operating a W kayak in the unique Riding position, your legs support your upper body’s weight, similarly to when you ride a horse, or an ATV. This means there’s simply no backrest for your legs to compress your lower back against. The W kayak is unique, and all other kayaks (I.E. sit-in and SOT) feature a system including footrests in front of the paddler, and a backrest behind them. Such kayaks require that you sit in the infamous L position, with your legs stretched in front of you – constantly pushing your lower back against the seat’s backrest, and thus creating a condition that often leads to pain and injuries among kayakers, and kayak anglers.

2. Various ergonomic positions to switch to, anytime:

When you operate a W kayak, you can switch between Riding, Sitting in several postures (none of which is the infamous L position), Standing up, and Lying down on the saddle, in several postures. This means you can effectively ‘unkink’ , rest, stretch – both standing up and lying down, and relief local fatigue and stress in any part of your body, while still being in the boat, and operating it. None of the positions offered by the W kayak is potentially harmful.


Common Kayak Injuries

Paddling a common kayak, be it a sit-on-top (SOT) kayak or a sit-in kayak (SIK) involves being seated in the non-ergonomic L position, as well as paddling it in the traditional kayaking style that requires typical, repetitive motion. Both can lead to various injuries.

Lower Back Pain

Traditional kayak paddling technique, a.k.a. kayaking is based on torso rotation initiated from your hips. This motion is impossible to perform while you’re leaning backward (“slouching”) and it’s best performed while you’re sitting straight or preferably, slightly leaning forward. The combination of leaning with continuous, repetitive rotation puts strain on the lower part of your spine, known as the lumber spine, because it has to support your upper body even while rotating. What makes things significantly worse is the fact that while your lumbar spine is constantly rotating, your legs compress it against the backrest of your seat in order to transmit your paddling effort from your paddle, through your body, to your kayak, so as tom propel it forward through the water. This considerable force is applied constantly on your lower spine, a vulnerable area that has no other bones to protect or support it.

Regardless of how much padding your so-called “ergonomic” kayak seat my have, you will always feel discomfort to some degree, as long as you paddle either sit-in or SOT kayaks.

Only W kayaks do not require from you to be seated in the L position, and only W kayaks offer a wide range of paddling positions that you can switch to anytime you feel like it. The ability to introduce change into your posture offers to reduce stress levels from particular areas in the body, and provides relief. In addition, the W kayak’s saddle offers you the ability to stretch your body, and this feature is highly beneficial in this regard.

Sciatica

The L seated position in a kayak forces the lowest part of your spine, known as the tailbone, down onto the sciatic nerve, which is the largest nerve in the body. The sciatic nerve is formed by nerve roots coming out of the spinal cord in the lower back, and it runs from the lower back down through the buttocks to the feet.

Prolonged sitting in the L kayak position can result in pinching of the sciatic nerve. As a result, you will feel an acute pain starting deep in the rear that could travel down the leg. Before such pain is felt, you could experience other, milder symptoms in your legs, such as leg numbness.

Needless to say that being unable to stand up, stretch, or merely switch to another sitting position will increase the severity of the problem.

Shoulder Pain

The rotator cuff is a group of tendons and muscles in your shoulder, which connect the upper arm (humerus) to the shoulder blade (scapula).

In kayaking, the rotator cuff has to withstand a great deal of torque (twisting motion), especially in turning maneuvers and paddle strokes aimed at controlling your kayak. Such force applied on the shoulder can result in injury in the the rotator cuff tendons and muscles.

Here too, being able to change paddling positions and paddling styles is beneficial, as well as changing paddle strokes, but only W kayaks offer a variety of options that are sufficiently different from each other.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Wrist Injury

Carpus is a Latin word derived from the Greek word karpos, meaning ‘wrist’. The wrist joint is surrounded by a band of fibrous tissue that normally supports it. The Carpal Tunnel is tight space between this fibrous band and the wrist bones. The median nerve passes through the carpal tunnel and receives sensations from the thumb, index, and middle fingers.

Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms include numbness and tingling of the hand in the distribution of the median nerve, that is the thumb, index, middle, and part of the fourth fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be a temporary condition that completely resolves, or it can persist and progress.

Traditional kayaking technique involves repeated, typical wrist flexion in combination with wrist torsion, and can result in carpal tunnel syndrome. In order to minimize the risk for such injury to occur, you need to be able to change paddling styles and paddle strokes as often as you feel like, but the range of change and motion that common sit-in and SOT kayaks present is minimal.

Only W kayaks enable you to switch between a wide variety of paddling styles and paddle strokes, and paddle from positions that are totally different from each other , including standing up.

Foot Pain and Ankle Pain

When you sit in a sit-in or sit-on-top kayak, your feet are positioned at an unnatural angle, and they serve to lock you in the kayak, so that you keep being well connected to it at all times. This is especially true when you’re paddling and controlling the kayak, but it’s true for when you’re just fishing.

This position and activity of your feet frequently leads to injuries known as Pain in the Arches (I.E. the arches of your feet), Achilles Tendon (in the back of your ankle), and Ankle pain.