Tag Archive: heron

Fish of the week – barracuda

By Captain Larry Jarbo

Other than sharks, probably the most fearsome predatory fish that swims in the Atlantic Ocean is the Great Barracuda. These fish can grow over seven feet long and have razor sharp teeth capable of ripping human flesh to the bone.

Fortunately, these ferocious fish prefer to feed on smaller fish like mullet, ballyhoo, or grunts. Most barracuda attacks on people are cases of mistaken identity. The cuda mistook that silver Rolex watch on the swimmer’s wrist as a fleeing fish. Smart people don’t wear flashy objects or jewelry into the water.

Great Barracuda are found in the depths of the Gulf Stream, over shallow reefs, around shipwrecks, and throughout the back country creeks and bays. They are a good sport fish for kayak fishermen to target because they can be found in so many different environments. Though they may be found in schools in the ocean, Great Barracuda are predominately lone predators.

Both live and artificial baits can be used to catch barracuda. Large swimming plugs, surgical tube eels, and large plastic enhanced jigs will all catch these toothy denizens but I prefer live baiting them. In the deep, a short wire leader with a Goggle-Eyed Scad or Blue Runner swimming on a 3/0 – 5/0 hook is a good Barracuda bait. In shallow reef and back country waters, I use an empty twelve ounce Coca Cola plastic bottle for a homemade bobber to keep the bait (a pinfish or small grunt) out of the bottom.

Recently, the catch limits on Atlantic Barracuda in South Florida were wisely reduced to two fish per person per day or six cudas per boat. This is a most sensible way to protect the resource and the sport fishery that targets barracuda. Smaller barracudas (2 feet long or less) are good to eat seasoned and grilled but larger ones may carry Ciguatera poisoning due to toxins accumulating in their flesh from their own consumption of algae eating parrotfish.

The large cuda in the photo was caught on a kayak combo trip that included free mothership transport to the Gulf Stream. That day, we also caught a small shark, jacks, porgies, legal tilefish, and dozens of good eating grunts. Definitely, the four foot barracuda provided the fight and thrill of the day. After a battle on light line, the fish was too winded to be released. That predator provided dinner for the heron and pelicans at my dock, the head will become Stone Crab bait, and the fillets are fine shark bait for another adventure. Nothing goes to waste.

And, the picture will live on to encourage more people to experience the joy of fishing.

Fish and be happy…

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4 ft long barracuda hanging from a white Wavewalk 500 kayak attached to the mothership.
 
Key Largo, FL, February 2016

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Extended paddling and fishing season, by John Fabina

Wavewalk kayaks extend our paddling and fishing season into the cold water months. We can witness the fall color knowing that we will be safe, warm , and dry.

John

paddling standing october 2014

paddling on the river with autumn colors

view of the river bank

scenic view of the river with autumn colors

two herons looking for fish

 Read more kayaking and fishing trip reports from John »

Great Egret on the Broward, by Harry Selsor

A Northeastern wind courtesy of Hurricane Cristobal brought a little respite from the high humidity and dog days of August weather pattern.

Tides were favorable for a morning excursion on my wavewalk so I headed out to check out my recently repaired lens. I went to the “Secret Hideout” on the Broward River and found the Great Egrets and some Tricolored Herons enjoying the morning. Got a few loud protests as I paddled my kayak by the tree.

Harry

Reflections On Broward

Great Egret

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great-white-egret-spreading-wings

tricolor-heron-broward-river-fl

 

More from Harry’s photography and fishing kayak »

PS –

Went back to the “hideout” this morning and found a pair of Roseate Spoonbills…they let me drift right under them and take few hundred photos before heading off for breakfast…the Great Egret also stayed a bit longer. When I returned to the dock area got a few of the Little Blue Herons also. Harry

 

blue-heron-flying

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roseate-spoonbill (3)

roseate-spoonbill (4)

roseate-spoonbill (5)

Tricolored-heron-fishing

Review of my W500 kayak, by Kai Roth

I’ve taken many photos from my new W kayak. Herons, turtles, dramatic sky and copious amounts of lake weed. (Ugh, our poor little lake is choked.) Unfortunately, they’re of “snapshot” quality at best. Nothing that stands out as, “Wow, that’s a nice picture!” yet. At high zoom, which I use for the wildlife, the colors get washed out, the depth of field flattens and the images are kinda grainy. But the good news is that I can’t believe how close I was able to get to the herons without spooking them.

It was a bit breezy yesterday afternoon — my first time paddling when it wasn’t dead calm. I was pleased at how easy it was to go both into the wind and cross-wise, and that when I wanted to stay still to take photos, it didn’t drift or spin much.
I’m glad I tied a length of twine to the paddle. It has tried to escape a couple of times when I’ve put it down to take pictures. I’ve gotten ideas from the web site for how to keep it in place but haven’t made/tried any yet. And I think I need to sit higher, like on a cushion or something because I keep scuffing my thumbs on the paddle holder clips that Joe installed.

My neighbor came over and tried the kayak out. I told him, “You’d like this for fishing.” And yeah, he did until he heard the price 🙂

I’m having fun with it. Maybe I’ll even take up fishing.

I’ve written down some notes of my first impressions and will send a proper review in a couple of months. I’ll try to come up with something more creative than “My first season as a complete newbie paddler.” In the mean time, here are a couple of shots of our local herons. Mr Heron standing on one foot on one side of the lake and Mrs Heron fishing on the other.

~Kai

Pennsylvania

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Heron-female-PA-lake

January 2015, second review of the Wavewalk Kayak

Well, it took 3+ years but I bit the bullet and bought a Wavewalk kayak last summer — and I wished I’d bought one years ago when I first learned about them. In a nutshell… I *LOVE* it!

It’s not a sit-on-top so I’m not always sitting in a puddle. It’s not a sit-inside, so I don’t have to struggle to get up and down as if in a bathtub. And because there’s a center hump to straddle, I’m not sitting in an “L” position so I don’t get “Yak Back.” But it helps to have a cushion to sit on. That seat gets hard.
It’s symmetrical left to right and front to back so it doesn’t matter which direction I face.
It’s ultra stable. It tracks well. It doesn’t drift around too much. And it’s PERFECT for lakes or bays, even many slow-moving rivers.
It draws very little water so it can be used in shallow areas like swamps too.
It can be used sitting or standing, paddling or poling.
The company owners love to see what we’ve done with them. Fishing, duck hunting, wildlife photography, paddling around or sunbathing/stargazing in the middle of the lake.

For a touring kayak, it’s a heavy one. ~60 pounds. I can slide it onto the roof racks of my Subaru by myself but it’s easier with help, just because it’s kinda unwieldy. (Should I point out that I’m a Grandma?)

Now that I’ve got one, it gets the double-thumbs up from me. If you are interested in one too, your local dealer will arrange for a test ride. Bring your wallet cos you’ll want one.

~Kai
Poconos of PA

New photos from my Wavewalk kayak, by Michael Pyle

I have the coolest Kayak known to man. It’s called a Wavewalk Kayak, and is the world’s stablest fishing Kayak.
I custom made a camera mount for this boat and these images were captured using it.
I hope you like!

Michael Pyle

Tryonphoto.com

Great Blue Heron Dancing on Poles

Great Blue Heron on a log fishing

Red wing Blackbird

Copyright © Michael Pyle

 

Read Michael’s initial review of his W kayak »

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