Tag Archive: gas engine

An outboard gas engine is a gasoline combustion motor used for propelling boats. A small, lightweight outboard gas engine can propel a kayak.

My initial observations on the Wavewalk 700

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Key Largo, Florida

A couple days ago, I launched my W700 for the first time. It has taken a couple weeks to get my stone crab traps set up and dropped overboard from my commercial fishing boat “Line Dancer”. This vessel, a 27′ Lindsey w/ a B-series Cummins diesel, will make a fine mother ship to transport the W700 and my W500 to the Everglades, wrecks, reefs, and Gulf Stream waters surrounding Key Largo.

My initial observations include:

The W700 is the ideal family or couples vessel for economy and ease of transport. Where will you find a tandem yak that combines the best qualities of a kayak, canoe, catamaran, stand-up paddle board, and micro-skiff in one boat?

The W700 really is a magic boat. Not only is the W700 more stable and roomy than the W500 (which was the most stable yak I had previously used), the air tight buoyancy straddle seat is a major safety improvement. The center holes in the separately molded flotation seat can be used as rod holders. I plan to install a removable PVC post in one to hold a waterproof GoPro camera for videos.

Though a double paddle works fine to propel the W700, I prefer to use a canoe paddle. The W700 and W500 Wavewalks actually solo paddle easier than a canoe but you should know the J-stroke, sweep stroke, and other canoe paddling techniques to use a canoe paddle effectively.

Presently, I do not intend to make major mods to the W700. But, in time, there will be fore and aft motor brackets for both gas and electric motors as well as an anchor bracket and rod holders.

It is obvious, that the W700 is a great addition to the Wavewalk series but the W500 will travel with me up and down the East Coast from the Chesapeake to the Keys by truck bed or car top. The W500 is more portable for a solo yakker. Thus, it still has an important place in the product line.

I know many of the Wavewalk owners have put away their vessels for the winter. But, the temperature in the Keys is in the 70 degree range and the skies are mostly blue and sunny. So, there is still great fishing and boating to be found here in the Caribbean of the U.S.

 

pot-full-of-crab-claws

 

Wavewalk 700 on mother ship

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

More reviews of the W700 and W500 »

Rox Test Drives Her 1.2hp Outboard Motorized Bass Fishing Kayak

Here is the test ride, it was awesome!!!!!
I had a late start today, didn’t hit the water until 2pm. Cloudy, windy and water temps were 53.
Today was my maiden voyage in the W500 with my 1.2hp Gamefisher outboard motor.

It Was AWESOME, I had so much fun, the W500 handled like always – Stable, stable and yes Soooooooooo Stable. The motor made no difference in the balance, it was like the kayak was meant to be used with a gas outboard.
I was doing doughnuts, driving over my wakes, I felt like a Kid with a new Toy…………happy bass angler
I even stopped to fish a little, maybe 1/2 hour was spent on fishing.
All smallies came out of the channel in 10′ to 16′ of water. Rattle Trap was really the only lure I tried, time was short. Only 2 Smallies were picture worthy, lost a beast, and landed 6 that were cookie cutters, 13″.

These 2 Big Girls hit the RT like a freight train. They both did circles under water putting a good bend in my Med/Hvy BPS rod before coming up and jumping like crazy even with the cold water temps.

LIFE IS GOOD!!!!!!!

Rox

Fishing kayak with 1.2hp outboard motor in pickup truck bed

Rox' motorized fishing kayak in her vehicle with the motor mounted

Smallmouth bass caught in motorized fishing kayak, Connecticut

Smallmouth bass caught in motorized fishing kayak, Connecticut

Smallmouth bass caught in motorized fishing kayak, Connecticut

Smallmouth bass caught in motorized fishing kayak, Connecticut

Read more about Motorized Fishing Kayaks >>

Watch another motorized fishing kayak video from Rox >>


More from Rox bass fishing from her kayak >

Motorizing Your Kayak – New Section In Our Website

Electric trolling motors are becoming more popular, at east according to some people, and we’re also developing an alternative mode of motorization – outboard gas engines.
So we created a new section for this website, and it will be dedicated to motorized kayaks –
Why motorize your kayak that’s dedicated to motorizing your kayak:
What type of solution would best fit your kayak motorizing needs – an electric trolling motor, or an outboard gas engine? How to motorize your W kayak on a budget? What are the practices we recommend following in a kayak motorizing project?

Here is an example of a motorized W500 kayak with a 2HP outboard gas engine:

Visit the new section about motorizing your kayak >>


Motorized Kayaks

  • Why motorize your kayak, and do you really need a motor on board?

  • What type of motor would best fit your needs – electric trolling motor, or outboard gas engine?

  • How to motorize your Wavewalk® kayak on a budget?

  • What are the practices we recommend to follow in kayak motorizing?

 

This section of our website is dedicated to answering these questions, and others. Please don’t hesitate to call or email us if you have more questions.

NEW: A playlist (selection) of videos showing various motorized Wavewalks:

 

What about a car-top boat that paddles very well?

And what if you actually need a trailer-free, ultra-lightweight, two-person fishing boat that’s easier to paddle than a kayak?  Check out our 700 Series »

We classify the new, patented Wavewalk® 700 series as a two-person, car-top fishing boat (microskiff) because it offers enough room and load capacity for two anglers, and stability that’s on par with the stability offered by good size Jon boats and dinghies.
Common SOT and Sit-in fishing kayaks, including the biggest and widest ones, are prevented from providing such stability because of their monohull design, which is the primary reason why they cannot be driven with powerful outboard gas motors.
However, Wavewalk’s car-top boats from the 700 series are just 31″ wide, and they are much easier to paddle and more comfortable than SOT and Sit-In fishing kayaks are. Learn more »

And maybe you need a portable skiff that works well in a kayaking or canoeing mode? If you need to take two big and heavy anglers on board, plus a lot of fishing, hunting and camping gear, and a powerful motor, you may want to check the new Wavewalk® Series 4 »

 

The 500 Wavewalk® Kayak Series

Kayaks from the 500 are smaller than car-top boats from the 700 series. They can be outfitted with smaller, less powerful outboard gas motors, and carry less load.
Here is an example of a Wavewalk® 500 model outfitted with a 2HP outboard gas engine and a pair of inflatable side flotation modules, driven in choppy water at Horseneck Beach, Massachusetts –
This video demonstrates the high-capacity inflatable tube flotation, detachable spray shield and motor mount that turn this W500 fishing kayak into a small, high performance, motorized fishing kayak:

Why Motorize Your Kayak?

A motor adds to your kayak’s speed and range of operation. In certain situations, this can make the difference between being able to come back home, and staying out on the water, or beaching far from where you had launched from. That is to say that a motor can add an element of safety to your kayak fishing or touring experience.
Another consideration is that a motor can make life easier, if you don’t feel like paddling, or in case you’re not capable of paddling where you want to go.
If you’re fishing from a kayak, a motor can be useful for trolling, and for quickly skipping from one fishing spot to another.

Electric Trolling Motor or Outboard Gas Engine?

If you don’t own a Wavewalk® kayak, you may as well skip this section, since other kayaks are not suitable for outboard gas engines, and they can accommodate only weaker, electric motor systems that are commonly know as trolling motors, because they typically involve going at low speed, and generally on flat water.
However, if you own a W500 kayak and you’re looking to motorize it, you’re facing the problem of choosing between an electric power system, and an outboard gas engine.
Before going further, we’d like to clarify a number of things about outboard gas engines:
First of all, we don’t recommend using an outboard motor that’s rated above 2.5hp with a Wavewalk kayak from the 500 series, simply because there’s no need for more, in our opinion, and we think that a stronger motor might overpower the kayak, which is hazardous.
Second, when we refer to outboard gas engines, we mean 4-Cycle (4 stroke) motors that are cleaner, quieter, and easier to operate than the old, 2 stroke motors that require mixing oil in the fuel.
Third, we recommend using an outboard gas engine with a 20″ (long) shaft, and not a 15″ (short) shaft.

What are the drawbacks of outboard gas engines?

The most obvious is that they are noisy, while electric motors are quiet.
As far as fumes and ease of operation, the new 4-cycle motors are as clean and easy to operate as electric motors are: No fumes, no need to mix oil in the fuel, and starting them is easy.
Weight: The 2hp 4-cycle Honda outboard gas engine weighs 28lbs. It’s heavier than some small or expensive electric motor systems, but considerably lighter than others that can weigh up to 80lbs. In any case, at this weight you can lift the propeller out of the water and paddle your W500 without feeling much of a difference in performance. You can drag the kayak on the beach, and you can even car top it.
Price wise, a new 4-cycle outboard gas engine can cost between $500 and $1,500, while an electric trolling motor system can cost between $250 and $1,500.
Maintenance: Outboard gas engines require some maintenance while electric motor systems are almost maintenance free, but the new, 4-cycle motors are much easier to maintain than the old 2-cycle ones, so this is not necessarily a big disadvantage.
Some areas are restricted to motorboats, but not to ones that are powered by electric motors.

What are the drawbacks of electric trolling motors?

There’s a much broader choice of electric trolling motor systems on the market today, which means there are numerous advantages and disadvantages to consider.
The most common disadvantage in electric trolling motors is their limited range and speed, and the two are closely linked to each other. Gas motors offer unlimited mileage at high speed, since you can take plenty of extra fuel on board in a can. This is not the case with electric systems that depend on batteries that are either very heavy (too heavy to carry more than one on board at a time), or very expensive. Going at full speed with an electric trolling motor, even a weak one (30-40 lbs thrust) can drain your battery pretty quickly, even if it’s an expensive high-tech battery. This leaves you with a choice of a weaker electric motor, and consequently reduced speed.
When evaluating the potential of an electric trolling motor, you need to remember that going at full power instead of half power would never double your speed (in fact, in some cases the effect of adding power may be hard to notice…) but it would surely drain your battery at half time. You also need to bear in mind that both water and weather conditions often require using more than a fraction of your electric motor systems’ capacity, because the real world is not an ideal one. Knowing this, you need to view electric trolling motors data as representing perfect world situations that have partial, or little relevance to real-life situations in which you could, and eventually would find yourself on the water.
Weight: A standard, deep cycle marine battery can weigh between 40-60lbs. That’s a lot for a small, car top boat such as the W500 kayak. On top of this, the motor itself adds weight, so the entire electric trolling motor system can weigh more than the kayak itself, which is counter productive and problematic. For example: If your heavy, deep cycle marine battery runs out of juice far from your starting point, you’d need to paddle your kayak back with an additional heavy load on board – It’s a point worth consideration, especially if you imagine going against a tidal  current, and/or strong wind, while being tired after a long kayak fishing or touring trip.
Price: A battery, cheap electric motor and charger can be yours for less than $250. This is a good deal, but you’ll pay the price in high weight and low speed. At the other end of the spectrum, a computerized electric trolling motor system with integrated GPS would cost you over $1,500, and although it will be lighter than an outboard gas engine, it would still offer less speed and a smaller range of travel.
Maintenance: While electric motors are practically maintenance free, their batteries need recharging, which takes both time and a power outlet that might not always be available to you.

Thrust, Horsepower (HP) and Kilowatts (KW)

People outfit their W500 kayaks with electric trolling motors ranging between 25-70 lbs thrust, with the typical range being 30-50 lbs thrust.

As for outboard gas motors,  the range for W500 kayaks goes from 2 HP to 3 HP, with the typical unit being a long shaft 2.3 HP motor, and up to 6 HP for the W700 in the special RIB configuration.

We recommend not to overpower your W kayak, as doing so may be hazardous.

Kilowatts and Horsepower
  • 1 KW = 1.34 HP
  • 1 HP = 0.745 KW

This basic information could be useful when you read electric motor specs…

Conclusion? -Between outboard gas engines and electric trolling motors there is no winner or loser, and it’s up to you to systematically weigh the pros and cons, relatively to your touring, camping and fishing needs, as well as your carrying capabilities, and last but not least – your budget.

Tip I: If you’re thinking long trips, camping, moving water and tandem – think outboard gas engine. If you’re thinking short trips, flat water and lighter loads, think electric trolling motor. Needless to say that more power equals more fun, but too much speed could be hazardous.

Tip II: Whether you choose to outfit your kayak with an electric motor or a gas outboard engine, if you’re planning to take your W kayak in saltwater, make sure the motor is rated for saltwater.

Understanding Thrust vs. Horsepower – read more »

Smarter electric motors and Lithium-Ion batteries – A winning combination for kayak fishing By Gary Thorberg

Wavewalk 500 Battery Pack  By Captain Larry Jarboe

Motor Kayak Recovery

Whether you motorize your kayak with an outboard gas engine or an electric trolling motor, you’d need to take into consideration the extra weight, and consequently add flotation to your kayak, so that you may be able to recover it case of an accident. Read more about flotation »

How To Motorize Your W500 Kayak On A budget?

The number of options and price range of small outboard gas engines is limited, which makes it easier to decide. The choice of motors for the W700 series is much broader.

As for electric trolling motors, you can find inexpensive ones online and in stores, and the same is true for batteries and chargers, although buying a battery online doesn’t make much sense due to the high cost of shipping – unless the battery is shipped free, for store pickup.

Side Mount or Transom Mount?

It’s possible to mount a small, lightweight gas outboard on the side of the W500, as demonstrated here »    But due to their weight and power, we recommend mounting such motors at the back of the W500 kayak cockpit, using a transom mount. In this position, steering is made easy by the use of a long, articulated (U-jointed) tiller extension.

As for electric trolling motors, being lighter, they can be mounted either at the back of the cockpit (transom mount), or on its side.

Some of the more expensive electric motor systems come with a kayak mount, but we recommend you double-check if the mount is compatible with the W500 kayak – Chances are that it is not.

Short Propeller Shaft or Long Shaft?

20″ Long (L) propeller shaft outboard motors fit both the W500 and W700 series perfectly, and these are the motors that we recommend using.
As for short (typically 15″) shaft motors, they don’t perform well with Wavewalk® kayaks and boats, and we do not recommend using them. This is true both for electric and gas motors.

The 20″ distance is measured from the inner top side of the motor’s clamp bracket to the horizontal ventilation plate located above the propeller. More info on how to measure the outboard propeller’s shaft length »

Any motor, whether electric or gas, whose propeller shaft is shorter than 20″ is not recommended for use with Wavewalk® kayaks or portable boats.

More info:  Testing 15″ short (S) shaft outboard motor performance with Wavewalk kayaks and boats »

Accessories For Motorized Kayaks

Wavewalk offers 2 models of transom motors mounts for its 500 series –

  • The TMM 20 fits 20″ long (L) propeller shaft motors
  • The TMM 20-A fits 20″ long (L) propeller shaft motors
  • The TMM 700 HD (Heavy Dury) fits 20″ long (L) propeller shaft motors. This is a W700 accessory.

high volume DETACHABLE inflatable flotation modules

inflatable-side-flotation-modules-motorized-kayak-640

More information about these Inflatable Flotation Tubes »

DETACHABLE transparent spray shield

beached motorized kayak

More information about the Spray Shield »

Overpowering your motorized fishing kayak

Overpowering a kayak or a boat can be hazardous, and result in accidents, which is why we recommend not to do it.
The following article discusses various aspects of overpowering, and features a video of a W500 powered by a 6 hp outboard motor »

beached motorized fishing kayak

W500 motorized kayak

Important SAFETY ADVICE

For users of Wavewalk’s motor mounts from all models: Before going on a motorized trip, verify that the wide wooden bolt knobs that secure the Wavewalk® motor mount to the kayak are safely tightened to the maximum. Failing to tighten the bolt knobs could result in unwanted vibrations and noise. If you feel such unusual vibrations and/or hear unusual noise, stop the motor, turn around, and tighten the bolt knobs to the max.
Driving with loose bolt knobs is hazardous, similarly to driving with the motor’s clamp screws loose, and it could result in an accident.

Adding a pair of 5/16″ nuts would lock the knobs in place, and prevent them from getting loose.

Never operate the motor without the motor’s stop switch (“kill-switch”) attached to your arm.
For motor operation and maintenance please refer to your motor’s owner’s manual.

Fishing Kayak With Outboard Gas Motor, By Gary Thorberg, Minnesota

Gary mounted a 2 hp Yamaha outboard gas engine on his W500 fishing kayak, and this is how he did it:

Motorized fishing kayak with 2 hp outboard gas engine

Gary made this great looking motor mount from an aluminum profile and oak wood.

fishing kayak outboard gas motor locked in an upward position, in a paddling mode

Gary’s outboard motor locked up, in a position enabling him to paddle his kayak.

back view of fishing kayak with outboard motor: Room to turn the propeller 360

Plenty of room to turn the propeller around, in 360 degrees

kayak mount for outboard gas engine

Close up: Transom mount for kayak outboard gas motor

transom mount for outboard gas motor for fishing kayak

Transom mount for outboard gas engine for Gary’s fishing kayak

clamp detail from transom mount for attaching outboard gas engine to fishing kayak

This special clamp configuration assures good grip of the mount.

See movie in Gary’s comment below —

Read more about motorizing your fishing kayak »


More northern kayak fishing insight from Gary »