Tag Archive: fishing trip

A fishing trip is a trip taken by a recreational angler, or a group of such anglers, for the purpose of enjoying fishing as an outdoor sport. Typically, a fishing trip in a kayak can take several hours, and up to an entire day. In most case, anglers paddle their kayaks, but using motorized kayaks is common as well.

Wavewalk S4 for spearfishing – enhanced

We went out on the jetty for a bit and I shot a couple nice snapper. Candy cooked up the fillets.

I made this spray shield from Lexan. Before I bend it around I wanted to see how it does out wide like this.

I also finished my two tank holder for scuba diving. It just slipped right in. I painted plastic dip on top and on the bottom to keep it from sliding around, and cut a groove for the saddle bracket. It fits right in.

We tested the spray shield today.

Candy: -“I’m near the front and this is my current view. Jesse did an amazing job on the spray shield. Pretty much dry!” –

 

I ended up bending it around, and it works really good –

More Wavewalk S4 adventures with Jesse  and Candy »

W700 striper trip

By Roxanne Davis

 

It’s June 1st, and I got a call from buddy Mike that he and his Father were taking the canoe striper fishing.

So I loaded up my gear and met them at the launch.

They were having some motor starting troubles, so I set out ahead of them.

Ran up river and started my drift back down, casting some top water, with no interest, then a single paddle tail on a 3/8oz gotcha jig head……nothing, not even a follow.

I picked up the rod with my hot lure for Stripers this season, first cast, nothing, second cast third or forth crank of the reel and BAMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!

Fish on, and the tow ride down river begins.

She was digging down hard, shaking her head and up and rolling on the surface trying to get away.

As I got here closer to the W700, she dove right under it.

Good thing I fight these standing up, or she would have broke my rod if I was sitting, I wouldn’t have got the rod down in the water in time.

Rod tip in the water, fighting the fish back out from under the W700.

I get her boat side again, I reach from my lip grippers and got her mouth on the first try.

Then I realize I forgot my pliers!!!!!

Lucky for me she didn’t fight me as I removed the two hooks in her mouth.

Now Mike and his Dad got the motor running and we head up river, I stayed behind them for fear of causing a wake
and tipping them over……it wasn’t pretty, but they got it done.

 

 

Start drifting back down river and my lure gets slammed as soon as it hits the water!!!!

Fish On…………………………off…………what the heck…….my rig broke, and she’s gone.

Still fishable, I cast out again and BAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!

She hit it hard, rod doubled over…..then POP…she was gone….the rig broke again and now will be put to rest.
(Till I make a new one)

It was time to end the trip, skies were looking mean and the wind was starting to kick up.

My buddy and his Dad were already back at the launch when I headed in.

Still a Great day in my book, just being on the water is good enough, the fish I catch are just a Bonus.

I Love my W700, she getting way more love then the W500’s lately, but summer is here and and they will get tons of use with my Daughter, Lisa, and my Grand Daughter, those trips I will take video’s of.

Life is Good!
Tight Lines and MoPaddle Safe All.

Rox

 

More fishing adventures with Rox »

Fly fishing therapy at the annual shad run on the St. Johns river

By Kevin Eastman

Interesting story on my little 2 hp Yamaha I use on the boat. I know I haven’t used the motor in at least two years, maybe longer. I pulled it out a few weeks ago. The gas tank was full of non leaded gas that has had marine stabilizer in it. I didn’t really think it would run well but I put it in a tank and gave it a pull. The little bugger started on the first pull. I used that tank for my trip below and it never gave me one problem. I was pretty surprised.

Now for the fishing.
This week I decided I needed to make the two hour trip from St. Augustine to the upper St. Johns River for the annual Shad run. Actually upriver is south for the St. Johns, as it is one of a handful of rivers that runs from south to north in the US. The Shad migrate from the ocean to the headwaters of the St. Johns to breed each year. They are fun to catch on light fly gear and are tenacious fighters. I decided I didn’t want to bother hauling my skiff and the hassle of packing everything so I popped the W500 in the back of my Ridgeline, threw the motor in along with some fly gear and was on my for a little fly fishing therapy, launching at the Jolly Gator Fish camp.
I didn’t exactly kill them but caught a couple to satisfy my itch. I also hooked two of the larger Crappie, and Bream (Sunfish to you Yankees) that I have ever landed. So, not a stellar day but at least fish were had. The area is very unique. The river meanders through a large expanse of grass and marsh lands that are used for grazing horses and cows. Plenty of wildlife from herons, egrets, white pelicans, otters, gators, wild pigs, and other creatures. The river also contains quite a variety of fish to catch, including hybrid striper bass. I usually get one trip in a year for the Shad run, though this year I may need one more to see if I can do a little better in the catching department.

 

 

 

More fly fishing with Kevin »

10 good reasons to motorize your kayak

Wavewalk is the world leader in motorized kayaks in terms of stability, load capacity, seaworthiness, speed, versatility, mobility, comfort, and more.
This article answers the question “What are the advantages of motorized kayaks over non-motorized ones?”

1. Motorizing is easier than paddling

Not everyone can paddle their kayak over long distances, or in less than perfect conditions. Some kayakers suffer from disabilities, and others are elderly or not physically fit. Assisted paddling, namely paddling while an electric motor provides your kayak with additional propulsive power makes things easier, be it in strong wind, fast currents, or waves, as well as on flat water. When you motorize, you save your own energy, and you’re more comfortable.

2. Having a motor is safer than depending solely on paddling

A human powered kayak is an under powered vessel, by definition. In a sustained mode, an average adult paddler can produce between one tenth of a horsepower and one quarter of a horsepower, and this is very little, even in comparison to weak electric motors. In case you’re too tired to paddle back to your starting point, or due to unfavorable changes in water or weather conditions, being able to propel your kayak with a motor can be a critical factor that could save your trip, and even your life – A motorized kayak is safer than a non-motorized one.

3. A motor greatly increases your range of travel

Simply, having an extra source of power on board allows you to go further, since you can paddle to your destination, and motorize on the way back. So, whether you’re on a touring, fishing or on a photography trip, the motor allows you to cover more water, explore, and go to more places.

4. A motor allows you to take a bigger payload on board – cargo and/or passengers

You may want to take a passenger on board, or load your kayak with heavy camping gear, but this additional weight could make it too hard for you to paddle. In such case, a motor could make the difference.

5. Motors work well for trolling

You can paddle your kayak and fish at the same time, namely engage in trolling, but an electric trolling motor or a small outboard gas motor can do a better job than your paddle.

6. Driving a motorized kayak is fun!

Driving a motorized kayak can be fun too, especially if it’s a Wavewalk that’s outfitted with a powerful outboard motor. And driving standing, which is an option that all Wavewalk models offer, is even more fun – It’s comparable to skiing, except you’re going on water and not on snow, and it’s also comparable to water skiing, except for the fact that you’re free to go anywhere you want, including in choppy water and in waves, and you don’t depend on a powerboat to tow you.

7. A motor can get you to places that you otherwise couldn’t access

A Wavewalk outfitted with a mud motor (surface drive) can go where other boats can’t, and even where human powered kayaks can’t, such as mud flats, fast streams, etc.

8. Driving saves time

An S4 Wavewalk kayak outfitted with a powerful outboard motor can go at speeds approaching 20 mph, for as long as you want. This is more than five times the speed that a strong kayaker in a fast kayak (that is not a typical fishing kayak) can sustain for a limited amount of time, on flat water. In other words, a motor kayak can get you much faster to where you want to go, and back.

9. Motor boating is cool, and speed is exciting

Not everyone likes paddling, and not everyone thinks it’s cool. You may want to take someone on board your kayak, be it a child, your wife, an elderly parent, a fishing buddy, etc., and find that kayaking (or canoeing) doesn’t appeal to them, but going in a motorboat would, and to some of them the appeal would be greater if you go at high speed.

10. Helping other kayakers

Having a kayak powered by an outboard motor puts you in a unique position of being able to help other kayakers. You could do it by carrying heavy camping equipment on board your motorized kayak (realistically, only a Wavewalk…), taking passengers that aren’t fit for paddling, and by towing other kayaks.

 

More articles on these subjects –

How much HP for my S4 skiff’s outboard motor?

Developments in Motorized Kayaks

Paddling in Strong Wind

Boat stability in a kayak

Motorize your fishing kayak?

How Much Gear Can You Store Inside a Wavewalk Fishing Kayak?

Fishing Kayak Stability

Motorizing Your Kayak – Why, How, What Etc…

 

Bob and Austin’s fishing adventure in the mangrove tunnels of Key Largo

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Wavewalk Adventures Key Largo

Bob and his grandson Austin had a great adventure yesterday.
Austin caught a nice mangrove snapper.

 

 


 

More diving, fishing and outfitting with Captain Larry »