Tag Archive: fishing tackle

The fishing gear that an angler carries on board their kayak, including fishing rods, tackle box for the lures, hooks etc, a fishnet, and various tools including knives, pliers, and more.

From Wavewalk 500 kayak to Wavewalk S4 skiff

Dan VanMetre

Texas

I bought an S4 a few months ago and wanted to share what I’ve done with it and how I’m using it.
Couldn’t be happier with the boat.

I upgraded to an S4 skiff after owning an original Wavewalk for many years. I fish the Texas Gulf coast and have loved my new S4. Not only have I spent a lot of time on the water … I have spent a lot of time in the garage and at the hardware store customizing it for what I love to do. I wanted to share some of the ways I have configured my skiff. Thanks Yoav for making this boat!!

 

I know this won’t be for everybody, but I have been completely thrilled with how the S4 has performed with the motor configuration I used. I bought a 15 inch shaft 6 HP motor and ended up raising the transom so that the bottom of the motor’s skeg is only 6 inches below the hulls. I fish very shallow water and can run full speed in basically ankle-deep water. The prop is high enough that it would cut through the hull on a turn so I had to attach a carefully sized piece of polyethene to the motor to prevent the prop from getting to close to the hull. I am getting 13 mph top speed with this set-up.

 

Out-of-the-way spot to carry a full-sized bucket, cast net, and bait box.

 

I put a drain on both sides of the skiff. This has really worked out great. It makes it easy to get the water out of the hulls during clean-up and also gives me peace of mind when I haul it on top of my truck in heavy rain. I screw them in from the top so the bottom hulls remains a smooth surface.

 

I have had a blast customizing the S4 and there is so, so much you can do. Here is where I officially went overboard….I love the up-front storage for life jackets, wading boots, ice chest, etc. But I wanted that stuff to stay up front when I am driving on a plane and bouncing around. I put in some PVC twistable stoppers. A little much, but it works great!

 

The S4 has worked great for sight fishing redfish on the Texas gulf coast. I stand on the front deck and paddle a shallow shoreline. When I see the redfish, I put the oar in the front holder, twist and push the pole to anchor, grab the rod and make a cast. Quick, quiet, and efficient.

 

Chair works great. Less than $10. I attached a piece of PVC to the base so it stays secure and put some ethafoam for support. It can be moved to any hole in the saddle and it even swivels.

 

I installed 2 watertight portals into the saddle. One in front and one in back. I wedged a piece of ethafoam right behind the openings and also in the brackets so items stay within reach and don’t get stuck. I can store a lot of tackle and equipment.

 

 

Driving an S4 motorized kayak skiff with a 9.8 HP Tohatsu outboard at 17 mph

Captain Larry Jarboe from Wavewalk Adventures in Key Largo, Florida, drives his “White Knight” workhorse S4 kayak-skiff powered by a 9.8 HP 2-cycle Tohatsu outboard motor, outfitted with a 9″ pitch propeller.
Larry easily gets to a 17 mph speed, which is probably a world record for vessels that are officially designated as kayaks, such as the S4.
He drives sitting in the side-saddle position, similarly to the way that he’s been driving dinghies and other small boats for decades – No stability problems, and no control problems, even in the chop. Most people who drive the S4 and other Wavewalk kayaks / boats do it in the riding position, with a leg on each side of the saddle seat, similarly to the way that Personal Watercraft (PWC a.k.a. jet-ski) drivers operate these vessels.

Generally, 2-stroke outboard motors are lighter than comparable 4-stroke outboards, which makes them more portable.
9″ is the highest pitch for propellers that fit this motor. A propeller with a higher pitch would have probably added some speed to Larry’s record. In any case, 17 mph falls within the upper range of speeds achieved by small, lightweight boats with propellers of such pitch.

 

Practically speaking, this performance coupled with the S4’s capability to carry on board up to three anglers and their fishing gear, puts it on par with Jon boats, skiffs, and even some bass boats.
The S4 is an ultralight car-top boat that can be launched and carried anywhere, as well as paddled in extremely shallow water, and it is most seaworthy. These facts offer its users an advantage that neither conventional nor new boats do.

Note that Larry is a most experience boat driver, and driving such a small craft at such high speeds requires skills that not anyone has. This is to say that we do not recommend such powerful motors for the S4.

Wavewalk® 700: Quick and Easy Car-Top Boat

This instructional video shows a quick and easy way to upload this trailer free boat on top of a midsize and large size SUVs from the vehicle’s side.

Note that it’s possible to upload this boat on top of cars and smaller SUVs either from the vehicle’s front, or from its rear end.

 

Before you car top your fishing boat

Tip 1

Outboard motor and fishing gear should go in the back of your vehicle before you start car topping your boat. Although the paddle fits in the hulls, we recommend putting it inside the car as well.

Tip 2

Protect the car’s roof with a big towel, and do the same for the door.

Tip 3

Attach a short rope between the two front eyelets. This extra handle will come handy at a certain point, when you lift the boat up.

Tip 4

You want to use the eyelets on the sides of the front and the rear ends of the W700 cockpit as leads for the ropes or straps that you’ll use to attach it to the roof rack. It’s easier to get the rope through these eyelets while the boat is still on the ground, before you upload it. Common buckle straps are inexpensive and easy to use, and they work perfectly.

Plucking pickerel from a placid pond

By Captain Larry Jarboe

I spent the late afternoon fishing from my W500 in my secret spring fed beaver pond.
The leaves have mostly fallen in Maryland but there are pretty colors to please the pupils by plucking pickerel from a placid pond.

Not bragging, but, I kind of lost track of the number of fish on. There were plenty of Eastern Chain Pickerel chomping on my White Pearl Zoom Fluke. One smart a$$ fish even jumped over my line on the retrieve like it was skipping rope. All fish were released. They are very good to eat if you know how to remove the numerous Y shaped bones. Presently, I don’t have good kitchen facilities. I will have my way at BK.

So, don’t put your fishing gear away and winterize your Wavewalk, yet. There are more nice days to enjoy late fall fishing before winter officially arrives.

The proof is in the pics of pickerel.

 

beaver-in-the-water

 

beaver-swimming

 

big-pickerel-caught-in-maryland-pond

 

pickerel-and-wavewalk-500-kayak

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

 

Fishing beyond plan B

By Captain Larry Jarboe

For at least the next couple weeks, I am closing up my business up north. I have a little fish camp that I retreat to that is well located for many types of fishing in the Chesapeake Watershed.

This morning, I renewed my Maryland fishing license, loaded up the W500 on the back of the Mother Truck, threw in my catfish rods and tackle, and made a thirty mile trip to Mallows Bay on the Potomac River.

Mallows Bay is the largest ship graveyard in the Western Hemisphere. Dozens of archaic wooden steamships were scuttled there after WWI. The story which can be Googled is laced with governmental ineptitude and environmental calamity.

Upon arriving at the excellent public landing, I realized that I had forgotten to bring the 5 lbs. of fresh mullet that I bought over the weekend. Ineptitude still prevails at Mallows Bay.

Undaunted, I grabbed my Barnett compound bowfishing outfit to search for Northern Snakeheads to skewer. Those big Blue Cats at the edge of the channel would have to wait.

Plan B was not so good, either. The water was muddy and the Asian invasion has moved to deep water. So, a few pics would have to suffice.

On the way home, Plan C was formulated. A quick trip to the fish camp to trade the catfish rods for my lucky stik and off to my special spring fed pond to catch a few pickerel on a Texas rigged Zoom Fluke in the cooling evening. Freshwater barracuda trump a skunk.

Five Largemouth Bass releases later, as the sun set into darkness, a pickerel cut me off. No sense tying a new rig in the dark. Five bass is a pretty good day. And, I still have 5 lbs. of mullet in the fridge.

Wavewalk-500-on-the-potomac

 

largemouth-bass-on-the-potomac-1

 

largemouth-bass-on-the-potomac-2

 

Mallows-Bay

 

Mallows-Bay-2


More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »