Tag Archive: fishing lures

Fishing lures are man-made objects designed to attract fish and make them try to swallow them. Anglers attach the lure to the end of a fishing line outfitted with a hook. In most cases, the lure incorporates a hook.
When the fish bites the lure, it bites the hook in a way that makes it impossible to escape.
There are many types of lures designed to appeal to many different fish species and sizes.

One of those days – No fish caught, just a great paddling stroll

By Jill Toler

I am an early riser each day due to work so generally I wake up early on the weekends as well. This morning I actually slept in until 6:00 am, which put me a little behind in my “dawn patrol” plans. In my younger days, a few of my friends and I would hit the beach as the sun was coming up for a little dawn patrol surfing and boogie boarding. Last night I made a plan to do a bit of dawn patrolling in the W before church.

Loaded up about 6:30 am and headed to a new place for launching and fishing. I was on the water before 7:00 am; which was later than I intended, and throwing a popper in a very fishy looking area. I fished and paddled for two hours and never caught a fish. I know, I was shocked too. I did not expect to get skunked in that area but, I suppose it happens.

The area is Northwest Creek around Fairfield Harbour, NC. There are a lot of waterfront houses with docks and great cover in between the docks; reed grass, stumps, trees with overhanging branches, etc. I was at a loss since I didn’t even catch a sunfish. I paddled to the other side of the creek to try over there. The wind had shifted overnight and was blowing right down the creek and it was a bit difficult to stay in position. Still, nothing. I decided that it was just going to be “one of those days”. I paddled around to do a bit of sight seeing, then headed back to the ramp. Even though I didn’t catch any fish it was a beautiful morning paddling around in my W700 and I am thankful that I had the experience.

Here are a couple of pictures from my morning view.

scenery-near-fairfield-harbor, NC

 

view-of-the-shoreline

 

More fly fishing and rigging with Jill »

Trifecta – Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, and Northern Pike, while exploring new water

By John Fabina

I decided to explore new water on the Fox River today.
It was possible to launch the Wavewalk at a bridge where only a kayak could be launched. I wouldn’t attempt to launch here with a conventional kayak……..it would be easy to flip. It was a relaxing and fun day. I caught the trifecta , Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bass, and Northern Pike.
The bass were caught on a jointed Rapala and the pike on a Wacky worm.
As always hit the bridges for the current breaks and fish any inlets that dig out holes.

 

Northern-Pike

largemouth-bass

 

duck-swimming

fish-swimming

 

more-muddy-water-in-Fox-river

muddy-water

smallmouth-bass

somewhere-along-the-Fox-river

 

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Back in the saddle and fighting monster bass

I’m baaaack in the saddle again! Today was the day, the return to my beloved Wavewalk. Took a quick little afternoon trip to Upper Broad Creek with Fishing Buddy and picked up where I left off in January.

I thought I would be a little shaky the first few minutes but, no way, I felt great and took right off for a little point that has reed grass and a spiky stump. I tossed a “Trim Gim” by Bett’s poppers and hooked up with a pumpkinseed. He was a cute little fella and the popper was as big as his face. I tossed ole Gim to the left of the spiky stump, made two short strips, and felt some tension in the line. I figured I was hung up on spike so I lifted the rod tip to give it a little shake to release the popper and all of a sudden the rod gets bent slam over and then a big ole bass rockets out of the water. I was caught completely off guard thinking I was hung up on a stump. That dude looked like Jordan launching from the paint and made a move like you see at the Olympics during the diving competition. After the acrobatic display I strip striked to get the hook set and tried to keep from losing my rod. I don’t know how big that bass was but, it took 15 minutes for the hole to fill back up with water after he splashed down  😉
At some point during this epic battle the line went slack and I became intensely disappointed when I stripped my popper back without a big bass attached to it. As I sat there thinking about what could have gone wrong, I took a look at Ole Gim and noticed that the hook didn’t look quite right. Big ‘un had just about straightened it out.

Changed poppers and caught another pumpkinseed and a really nice bluegill. The bluegill was a whopper that I landed with the net.

It was a great trip and I’m so happy to be back out on the water in my Wavewalk. I’m going again soon and will let you know how it goes.

bass-fishing-kayak-and-angler-1024 bluegill lure pumpkinseed-1 pumpkinseed-2

 

More fishing and rigging with Jill »

 

How to use a downrigger for fishing in a Wavewalk kayak

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor, WA

One of the most important aspects of fishing is delivering your lure or bait to the exact spot where the fish are. This is a considerable challenge when the fish are suspended at a certain depth in the middle of the water column. Mostly this occurs because fish are cuing in on water temperature. If your fishing method involves trolling then there is no better tool for getting the lure to that precise depth than a downrigger. Basically it is a heavy weight on a pulley with a reel with either or depth counter (or like mine one turn is one foot) to determine how deep you are deploying your weight. You attach your mainline to this weight via a clip. The clip releases your line when you have a fish on, or when you pull it out of the clip. Since the mainline is released it is just your fish on the line, the weight is reeled up later when you reel up the downrigger.

In addition to using the counter your downrigger ball shows up on your fish finder, so you can see exactly where your lure is in relation to the fish on the screen. The Wavewalk’s unique catamaran design allows me to mount the downrigger so that it goes down the middle. This makes it easy to stack, which is putting two mainlines on a single downrigger at two different depths. Of course if you motorize your kayak you will want to have it mounted so that it goes over the side.

I hope that this video helps explain how we use the downrigger on a Wavewalk and lets you determine how you might use it too!

Happy fishing.


More kayak rigging, fishing and bow duck hunting with Chris »