Tag Archive: fishing kayaks

Fishing kayaks are kayaks designed and outfitted for fishing, typically by one angler for recreational fishing. In most cases, the angler propels their kayak with a dual blade paddle (kayak paddle), and in their cases, the kayak is motorized, typically with an electric (trolling) motor powered by a battery carried on board.
Most fishing kayaks are inadequate for fishing due to several reasons, including insufficient stability, poor ergonomics (lack of basic comfort), wetness, and lack of good storage space. Some bigger fishing kayak models are too wide, heavy and slow for an average angler to paddle. Such kayaks are commonly known as ‘barges’. Their large size also makes them too hard to car top, and they often require to be transported by trailer, which defies the purpose of kayak fishing.
The only kayak that’s stable, comfortable and dry enough for an average person to fish from is the W kayak. It is also the only kayak offering adequate storage, as well as easy entrance into the cockpit and easy exit from it.

Wavewalk at The Early Bird Sports Expo, Bloomsburg Fair Grounds, Bloomsburg PA

By Joe Stauder

HBBCO – Stand Up Fishing Kayaks

 

Come visit our Wavewalk booth at The Early Bird Sports Expo, Bloomsburg Fair Grounds, Bloomsburg PA.

Dates: Jan. 26th to 29th

 

 

 

New Video Playlist: Motorized Wavewalk

We created a new YouTube video playlist composed of movies that show Wavewalk 500 kayaks and 700 boats motorized with 2 hp, 2.3 hp, 3.5 hp, 5 hp and 6 hp outboard motors, and with an electric trolling motor.
These videos show motorized Wavewalks inland, at the beach, and offshore, with a crew of one or two on board.
Some are related to fishing, and others are not.
Our main selection criterion was that the motor must be a standard 20″ long (L) propeller shaft.
Our second criterion was the movie being fun to watch…

We embedded this playlist in this website section on Motorized kayaks.

 

Watertight riveting in kayaks and boats

Updated October 6, 2017

Pop rivets are widely used in the construction of boats, canoes, and kayaks.
Sealing rivets can be useful as a measure of extra precaution in case they come in contact with the water through which your kayak or boat goes.

How to better seal the rivets

Here are some tips for watertight riveting of kayaks and small boats made from Polyethylene –

  1. Polyethylene is the most widely used polymer resin (namely “plastic”) in kayaks, and it’s softer than aluminum and fiberglass used to produce other small boats. For this reason, it is recommended to use special aluminum rivets designed for riveting jobs in kayaks. These special rivets split in three, which increases their grip on the surface around the rivet. You can get these rivets in outfitters stores, and online.
  2. Drill holes of exactly the same diameter of the rivet that you use (3/16″), and preferably slightly smaller holes (5/32″).
  3. Apply a dub of Goop adhesive on the hole, and push the Goop into the hole. Goop is a powerful watertight adhesive used for plumbing and marine projects. The Goop you squeeze into the hole will coat its sides, and come out on the other side.
  4. Before you insert the rivet into the hole, coat its end with Goop. As you push the rivet into the hole, its tip will come out on the other side, and it will be coated with a thick layer of Goop. The sides of the rivet will be coated with Goop as well.
    gooping-the-rivet-01

    A rivet dipped in Goop watertight adhesive

    As you pull the rivet’s mandrel, the rivet will split in three and it will attach the two plastic walls while being coated with Goop. Excess Goop that will not come out on the other side or coat the sides of the hole, will remain on the outer surface and get squeezed by the rivet’s head. This way, the rivet’s parts that come in contact with the plastic will be coated with Goop, which will make them watertight.

  5. After you’re done riveting, coat the rivet’s head and the surface area around it with a generous amount of Goop. This will prevent water from touching the rivet, and in case of saltwater, it will prevent corrosion.

Outboard motor propeller shaft length for Wavewalk fishing kayaks and boats

November 12, 2016

Wavewalk will no longer support the installation of any outboard motor whose propeller shaft is shorter than the standard 20″ long (L) on its W500 fishing kayaks and W700 portable boats.

How to measure an outboard motor shaft’s length?

An outboard motor’s propeller’s shaft length is measured from the top inner side of the motor’s clamp bracket to the horizontal anti-ventilation plate located above its propeller. Read more about how to measure this length precisely »

The outboard motor industry has determined four standard lengths for outboard motor shafts, which are:

  1. 15″ (S) “Short”
  2. 20″ (L) “Long”
  3. 25″ (XL) Extra Long
  4. 30″ (XXL) Extra Extra Long

For both the Wavewalk 500, 700 and 4 series, the length we recommend is 20″ (L).

What’s wrong with short shaft outboard motors?

Depending on the type and quality of the motor mount’s installation, the use of shorter shaft motor (electric or gas) can result in any of the following problems:

  1. Motor mount’s mounting plate too high – Strong vibrations and loss of power due to ventilation that occurs when the propeller rotates at high speed too close to the surface, and its top part goes through a mixture of water and air bubbles coming from the surface.
  2. Motor mount’s mounting plate is too low – The motor mount’s mounting plate’s lower side scoops water and generates excessive spray, some of which can find its way to the back of the cockpit, and some to the top part of the motor.
  3. Motor mount too far behind the cockpit – Access to the motor’s controls is not easy, including for starting it, shifting gears, using the choke button, and refilling gas. Driving is harder too. The driver is forced to drive from the cockpits rear end, instead of driving from the middle of the cockpit.
  4. Motor mount’s mounting plate too low, and mounting plate too close to the cockpit – The motor’s top part is prevented from tilting downward in case the lower part of the propeller hits bottom or a submerged object and gets pushed upward automatically, in order to avoid damage. If this basic safety function is disabled, the propeller is exposed to severe damage, and so is the propeller shaft.

For the above stated reasons, Wavewalk does not recommend using any motor, electric or gas powered, whose propeller shaft is shorter than the 20″ (L) standard length.

Why does Wavewalk restrict its support now?

In the past, Wavewalk supported owners’ efforts to outfit their W500 kayaks with short-shaft motors. This policy stemmed from the fact that long-shaft motors in the 2-3 HP range are harder to find than short shaft ones, and we don’t recommend more powerful motors for the W500 series.
Installations of short shaft motors on Wavewalk kayaks and boats worked, but they were sub-optimal, since there is practically no way for a 15″ setup to match the performance and convenience that a 20″ outboard offers when properly mounted on a Wavewalk.

Last year we came out with the W700 series that’s compatible with several 20″ (L) outboard motors up to 6 HP, which is to say that since then, Wavewalk owners benefit from a much wider choice of outboard motor models.

Currently, the only outboard motor under 3 HP that we recommend is the lightweight, air-cooled 2.3 HP 20″ (L) 4-Cycle Honda.
Several outboard brands offer water-cooled, long shaft (L) motors in the 3.5-6 HP range, and our preference goes to Tohatsu, since these outboards (also sold under the Mercury brand) feature a gear shift lever in the front side of the motor, where it faces the user, which makes them easier to use.
Other 20″ (L) quality portable motors in the 3.5-6 HP range are offered by Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki, Evinrude (6HP only), etc.