Tag Archive: fishing kayaks

Fishing kayaks are kayaks designed and outfitted for fishing, typically by one angler for recreational fishing. In most cases, the angler propels their kayak with a dual blade paddle (kayak paddle), and in their cases, the kayak is motorized, typically with an electric (trolling) motor powered by a battery carried on board.
Most fishing kayaks are inadequate for fishing due to several reasons, including insufficient stability, poor ergonomics (lack of basic comfort), wetness, and lack of good storage space. Some bigger fishing kayak models are too wide, heavy and slow for an average angler to paddle. Such kayaks are commonly known as ‘barges’. Their large size also makes them too hard to car top, and they often require to be transported by trailer, which defies the purpose of kayak fishing.
The only kayak that’s stable, comfortable and dry enough for an average person to fish from is the W kayak. It is also the only kayak offering adequate storage, as well as easy entrance into the cockpit and easy exit from it.

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club recruiting new members

By Gary Rankel

 

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club

 

Our retirement community of about 2,300 people in Citrus Hills, Florida held its annual Activity Club Showcase yesterday where leaders of the many clubs and activities offered were provided tables on which to display handouts and other club materials. I drafted a handout on the Kayak Fishing Club I established last year and made it available along with other materials highlighting the fishery along Florida’s Nature Coast. I included handouts and pictures describing and depicting the Wavewalk, and answered questions about the sport and fishing kayak types.

While most of the old fogies attending congregated around the poker and bridge club tables, a few of the more adventurous ones stopped by expressing interest in the club. I offered “show-me” outings to a couple who wished to give my Wavewalk a try.

All in all, it was a good three hours spent. Hopefully, it will result in a few more club members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more about Gary’s kayak fishing trips »

 

Read Gary’s review of his Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak »

Wavewalk at The Early Bird Sports Expo, Bloomsburg Fair Grounds, Bloomsburg PA

By Joe Stauder

HBBCO – Stand Up Fishing Kayaks

 

Come visit our Wavewalk booth at The Early Bird Sports Expo, Bloomsburg Fair Grounds, Bloomsburg PA.

Dates: Jan. 26th to 29th

 

 

 

New Video Playlist: Motorized Wavewalk

We created a new YouTube video playlist composed of movies that show Wavewalk 500 kayaks and 700 boats motorized with 2 hp, 2.3 hp, 3.5 hp, 5 hp and 6 hp outboard motors, and with an electric trolling motor.
These videos show motorized Wavewalks inland, at the beach, and offshore, with a crew of one or two on board.
Some are related to fishing, and others are not.
Our main selection criterion was that the motor must be a standard 20″ long (L) propeller shaft.
Our second criterion was the movie being fun to watch…

We embedded this playlist in this website section on Motorized kayaks.

 

Watertight riveting in kayaks and boats

Updated October 6, 2017

Pop rivets are widely used in the construction of boats, canoes, and kayaks.
Sealing rivets can be useful as a measure of extra precaution in case they come in contact with the water through which your kayak or boat goes.

How to better seal the rivets

Here are some tips for watertight riveting of kayaks and small boats made from Polyethylene –

  1. Polyethylene is the most widely used polymer resin (namely “plastic”) in kayaks, and it’s softer than aluminum and fiberglass used to produce other small boats. For this reason, it is recommended to use special aluminum rivets designed for riveting jobs in kayaks. These special rivets split in three, which increases their grip on the surface around the rivet. You can get these rivets in outfitters stores, and online.
  2. Drill holes of exactly the same diameter of the rivet that you use (3/16″), and preferably slightly smaller holes (5/32″).
  3. Apply a dub of Goop adhesive on the hole, and push the Goop into the hole. Goop is a powerful watertight adhesive used for plumbing and marine projects. The Goop you squeeze into the hole will coat its sides, and come out on the other side.
  4. Before you insert the rivet into the hole, coat its end with Goop. As you push the rivet into the hole, its tip will come out on the other side, and it will be coated with a thick layer of Goop. The sides of the rivet will be coated with Goop as well.
    gooping-the-rivet-01

    A rivet dipped in Goop watertight adhesive

    As you pull the rivet’s mandrel, the rivet will split in three and it will attach the two plastic walls while being coated with Goop. Excess Goop that will not come out on the other side or coat the sides of the hole, will remain on the outer surface and get squeezed by the rivet’s head. This way, the rivet’s parts that come in contact with the plastic will be coated with Goop, which will make them watertight.

  5. After you’re done riveting, coat the rivet’s head and the surface area around it with a generous amount of Goop. This will prevent water from touching the rivet, and in case of saltwater, it will prevent corrosion.