Tag Archive: bait

Bait is used to attract fish and catch them

Another Wavewalk Kayak Adventure – Pennekemp State Park

By Captain Larry Jarboe

 

Springtime may be a little chilly north of the Florida Line but we are having wonderful weather in Key Largo.
Anthony from Broward County and his friend, Tom from New York, joined me for a wonderful Wavewalk day exploring the heart of Pennekamp State Park.
Tom had previously capsized a conventional kayak and ruined his cell phone on another non-Wavewalk expedition with another outfitter.
But, he had no problem standing in his W700 while Anthony took a well deserved snooze.
We paddled over 3 miles exploring the flats, creeks, and sunken barge wreck.

Anthony will come back to share a future Wavewalk Adventure with his fiancee.  He is looking forward to putting a W700 in his garage as soon as he gets a house.
And, Tom will return to New York as a pro-yakker and apprentice commercial fisherman who has mastered the art of catching bait.

The  “Rest of the Story” can be found at  capnlarryjarboe.com

We are having so much fun and healthy exercise!

 

 

 

 

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W700 Outfitted for Catching Catfish

By Captain Larry Jarboe

I took some time off on Saturday from setting up my Chesapeake Fish Camp and Wavewalk friends and family demos to make a run to Mallows Bay on the Potomac River.
In this shallow cove, resides the largest shipwreck graveyard in the Western Hemisphere. There is a beautiful park and public boat launch.
Though the catfish are spread out in the river and up the creeks, you can still catch a mess of catfish if you fish the right tide with the right bait.

The four way removable PVC spreader rod holder rig / anchor line cleat helps put enough baits all around the boat to tickle their whiskers.

8 Blue Cats and 3 Channel Cats did not come close to loading up the W700. But, they will make a fine fish fry.

Just wait till November when the big Blue Cats are lined up at the edge of the channel waiting for me to return…

Looking forward to summer Wavewalk adventures in the Keys.

Wavewalk 700 with four rod holders and a cutting board for bait

 

Wavewalk 700 next to shipwreck

 

Various catfish at the bottom of the hull

 

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How to use a downrigger for fishing in a Wavewalk kayak

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor, WA

One of the most important aspects of fishing is delivering your lure or bait to the exact spot where the fish are. This is a considerable challenge when the fish are suspended at a certain depth in the middle of the water column. Mostly this occurs because fish are cuing in on water temperature. If your fishing method involves trolling then there is no better tool for getting the lure to that precise depth than a downrigger. Basically it is a heavy weight on a pulley with a reel with either or depth counter (or like mine one turn is one foot) to determine how deep you are deploying your weight. You attach your mainline to this weight via a clip. The clip releases your line when you have a fish on, or when you pull it out of the clip. Since the mainline is released it is just your fish on the line, the weight is reeled up later when you reel up the downrigger.

In addition to using the counter your downrigger ball shows up on your fish finder, so you can see exactly where your lure is in relation to the fish on the screen. The Wavewalk’s unique catamaran design allows me to mount the downrigger so that it goes down the middle. This makes it easy to stack, which is putting two mainlines on a single downrigger at two different depths. Of course if you motorize your kayak you will want to have it mounted so that it goes over the side.

I hope that this video helps explain how we use the downrigger on a Wavewalk and lets you determine how you might use it too!

Happy fishing.


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The Pursuit of Kokanee begins… with Trout

By Chris Henderson

Fishing Kayaks of Gig Harbor

I will confess I am addicted to kokanee. They are a land locked sockeye salmon and IMHO are the best tasting fresh water salmonid. They are a challenge to catch in that they are very picky. The right color that they will bite on will change from hour to hour, so you have to have an arsenal ready when you go out. They can even get picky over how you flavor your corn. White shoepeg corn is the preferred bait, however, some add tuna oil, shrimp oil, even garlic. One day they will like one thing and the next day in the same lake, they will hit something else! In addition, they are very temperature selective, and will school at very specific depths.

It is early yet but they are starting to be caught at American Lake in Washington. I had yesterday off so I loaded up the Wavewalk W500 NWDR. The NWDR (Northwest Downriggin) is our favorite (and most popular) way to rig the W500 to turn these kayaks into fishing beasts. The downrigger (basically a weight with its own reel) allows for precise depth control. With the two front rod holders I am able to fish two lines at very different depths and the rocketlaunchers in the back hold the net and the Gopro. Because it is early the fish are very near the surface so I had one line clipped in at 19feet and the other I was just trolling on the surface. This was in 80-90 feet of water. This is a big lake and wind and waves can come up, but in the Wavewalk I am not concerned. I was trolling (.8 to 1.5 mph) all day from 6:30 am until I got back to the ramp at 2pm in a variable 5-10 mph wind and had no problems whatsoever.

Unfortunately I was not able to locate any kokanee yesterday. But the trout saved the day by being very willing and hungry. I released them at the beginning of the day, but after realizing that the kokanee were not going to bite what I had brought I decided to take what I was given and have something to take home for dinner. I ended the day with my 5 trout limit of 1 cutthroat trout and 4 rainbows. I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the meat!

Fun to be fishing again.

American Lake Map

cutthroat-trout-and-rainbow-trout

cutthroat-trout-and-rainbow-trout - cooked and served

 

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Fish of the week – barracuda

By Captain Larry Jarbo

Other than sharks, probably the most fearsome predatory fish that swims in the Atlantic Ocean is the Great Barracuda. These fish can grow over seven feet long and have razor sharp teeth capable of ripping human flesh to the bone.

Fortunately, these ferocious fish prefer to feed on smaller fish like mullet, ballyhoo, or grunts. Most barracuda attacks on people are cases of mistaken identity. The cuda mistook that silver Rolex watch on the swimmer’s wrist as a fleeing fish. Smart people don’t wear flashy objects or jewelry into the water.

Great Barracuda are found in the depths of the Gulf Stream, over shallow reefs, around shipwrecks, and throughout the back country creeks and bays. They are a good sport fish for kayak fishermen to target because they can be found in so many different environments. Though they may be found in schools in the ocean, Great Barracuda are predominately lone predators.

Both live and artificial baits can be used to catch barracuda. Large swimming plugs, surgical tube eels, and large plastic enhanced jigs will all catch these toothy denizens but I prefer live baiting them. In the deep, a short wire leader with a Goggle-Eyed Scad or Blue Runner swimming on a 3/0 – 5/0 hook is a good Barracuda bait. In shallow reef and back country waters, I use an empty twelve ounce Coca Cola plastic bottle for a homemade bobber to keep the bait (a pinfish or small grunt) out of the bottom.

Recently, the catch limits on Atlantic Barracuda in South Florida were wisely reduced to two fish per person per day or six cudas per boat. This is a most sensible way to protect the resource and the sport fishery that targets barracuda. Smaller barracudas (2 feet long or less) are good to eat seasoned and grilled but larger ones may carry Ciguatera poisoning due to toxins accumulating in their flesh from their own consumption of algae eating parrotfish.

The large cuda in the photo was caught on a kayak combo trip that included free mothership transport to the Gulf Stream. That day, we also caught a small shark, jacks, porgies, legal tilefish, and dozens of good eating grunts. Definitely, the four foot barracuda provided the fight and thrill of the day. After a battle on light line, the fish was too winded to be released. That predator provided dinner for the heron and pelicans at my dock, the head will become Stone Crab bait, and the fillets are fine shark bait for another adventure. Nothing goes to waste.

And, the picture will live on to encourage more people to experience the joy of fishing.

Fish and be happy…

barracuda-and-w500-fishing-kayak-Key-Largo-FL

4 ft long barracuda hanging from a white Wavewalk 500 kayak attached to the mothership.
 
Key Largo, FL, February 2016

 

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