Tag Archive: dry kayak

Kayak paddlers and anglers prefer to keep their feet and all other body parts as dry as possible. Some wear rubber booties, wet suits and dry suits for this purpose.
If you launch, paddle or beach a W kayak, you can stay drier than in any other kayak because the W offers you more protection, and you don’t necessarily have to step in water when entering or exiting the cockpit, since you can access it from the rear or the front.

White S4 arrived

By Jack Snapp

Texas

 

Took off from work early to get my S4 on the water the first time.
Arrived at boat launch and five minutes later was in the water. That’s at first! And without getting wet!   🙂
Easy to paddle seated or standing. Only minor issue was tracking in straight line up-river while coasting. Not an issue going down-river.
Shouldn’t be a problem with two people.
Can’t wait to motorize.
Woo Hoo!!!!!

Oh, love the storage. Can pack it at home and then straight in the water. Same when coming out of water. Not like a SOT kayak where you loading/unloading your gear to transport.
That’s a huge plus for me.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Update I

Spent 3 1/2 hours on Lake Dunlap this morning.
Beautiful day. Got lots of stares. Almost constant paddling, seated and standing.
So comfortable!
Could have gone much longer.

 


Update II

Had a blast on the water on Sunday. Just need to get used to steering behind me. S4 handled perfectly, even over the wakes from other boats and jet skis. Got a few stares and thumbs up. Plenty of power from the 6hp Tohatsu to get to my fishing spots quickly. Then, I can tilt the motor up and paddle/pole around the skinny water.


Update III

Got my S4 up to 13 mph, but it runs consistently at 11 mph at open throttle. Just me and light gear on board. Wonder if others are experiencing the same, or better. Love to jump the wakes of jet skis and other boats. But, normally not at top speed. It could easily handle a larger motor.
 

Paddling and sailing the Great Lakes with my Wavewalk 700

By Forrest Henry

Michigan

Everything is fine. Only been able to use the kayak for a few hours, but love it.
I also sailed the kayak for a while using the Wind Paddle sail. Looking forward to spring!!

I finished the spray skirt this morning. The driveway marker was too stiff, so I used a fiberglass flat strip that was part of a canopy for my rope hammock. The canvas lays on my lap when I sit in the center of the kayak.
I also attached a piece of lexan with velcro to the back of the kayak to use as a table.

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And for a cart I am using a modified Magnus cart from paddlelogic. When the off-the-shelf Magnus did not fit, Dave, the owner, was very accommodating and made arms that are 3 inches longer and a wider axle.

No sailing pictures yet.

Watertight riveting in kayaks and boats

Pop rivets are widely used in the construction of boats, canoes, and kayaks.
Sealing rivets can be useful as a measure of extra precaution in case they come in contact with the water through which your kayak or boat goes.

How to better seal the rivets

Here are some tips for watertight riveting of kayaks and small boats made from Polyethylene –

  1. Polyethylene is the most widely used polymer resin (namely “plastic”) in kayaks, and it’s softer than aluminum and fiberglass used to produce other small boats. For this reason, it is recommended to use special aluminum rivets designed for riveting jobs in kayaks. These special rivets split in three, which increases their grip. You can get these rivets in outfitters stores, and online.
  2. Drill holes of exactly the same diameter of the rivet that you use (3/16″), and if possible, even slightly smaller holes (5/32″).
  3. Before you insert the rivet in the hole, coat its end with Goop, which is a powerful watertight adhesive used for plumbing and marine projects. As you push the rivet into the hole, some of the Goop will coat the inside of the hole, and some will come out on the other side and get squeezed
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    A rivet dipped in Goop watertight adhesive

    onto the inner surface as the rivet splits in three and presses against the inner surface. Excess Goop that will not come out on the other side or coat the sides of the hole, will remain on the outer surface and get squeezed by the rivet’s head. This way, the rivet’s parts that come in contact with the plastic will be coated with Goop, which would improve their water tightness.

  4. After riveting, coat the rivet’s head and the surface area around it with a generous amount of Goop. This will prevent water from touching the rivet, and in case of saltwater, it would prevent corrosion.

Keeping the cockpit of your Wavewalk dry at sea

When you paddle your Wavewalk in waves without covering the front end of its cockpit, some spray may get inside, especially if you paddle through big surf. The water is drained to the bottom of the hulls, and it flows backwards to the rear part of the hull tips. Altogether, this is rather insignificant.

When you drive a motorized Wavewalk in the ocean for a long time, at high speed and through waves, your boat generates more spray, and breaking waves can result in more water getting into the cockpit. A Spray Shield works to minimize intake from the front, but not from the sides. Some water may accumulate on the bottom of the hulls, at the rear end of the boat. A few gallons of water would be unnoticed, but having effective means to remove any amount of water at any time is highly recommended, simply because stuff happens, and you’d better be well prepared for any case.

Comparing different solutions

1. One-way valves

Many motorboats and sailing boats feature one-way valves at the rear end of their hulls. When the boat moves in the water at high speed, the low pressure behind its stern causes the valve to open, and pulls out the water that accumulated at the bottom of the hull, namely the bilge.
A hull outfitted with such a valve is called ‘self bailing’.
Needless to say that SOT kayaks described by their manufacturers as “self bailing” are not, and the misuse of this term is misleading.

After much consideration, we decided not to outfit the hulls of the Wavewalk with such valves, for two reasons, which are:

  • Unlike big motorboats, a Wavewalk can be dragged on the ground and over rocks, and this might damage the valves.
  • One-way valves can get jammed, and since the Wavewalk often goes in shallow water that’s mixed with sand and mud, and where vegetation can be abundant, the possibility of such malfunction cannot be disregarded.

2. Electric bilge pump

Battery recharged on board –
Some small outboard gas motors (e.g. Tohatsu, starting at 4 HP) offer the option to add an alternator (electric current generator) and an AC to DC converter. Thus, the motor continuously produces an electric current that can charge a battery that would power an electric bilge pump and/or an electric trolling motor.
This solution sounds perfect – just press or turn an electric switch, and bail the water out. And if you get an automatic pump, you don’t even have to remember to activate it.
But a closer look at the details of this solution revels some problems:

  • Cost – The combined cost of an alternator and converter is around $450. The cost of a battery and an electric bilge pump would bring the total cost of this solution to over $500. It may not be a prohibitive price, but it’s still a considerable sum in the context of a Wavewalk boat.
  • Vulnerability – Keeping a battery and electric pump somewhere in your Wavewalk may not be enough, and you’d need to secure both, so that in case of an accident they would remain inside the cockpit and be fully operational when needed the most. This could prove to be somehow hard to achieve.

Battery not rechargeable on board-
An electric bilge pump powered by a battery that isn’t being continuously charged makes sense, because unlike propelling the boat, pumping a few gallons of water out of its hulls require little power.
The downside of this simple solution is having to remember to charge the battery before each motorized trip offshore, and the possibility that in case of an accident the system could stop working.

3. Hand bucket

Simply a square bucket with a handle (or without one) that fits into a Wavewalk hull, and used as a bilge bucket.
It works, but only in case there is a lot of water in the hull, namely that the water is deep enough, and the user faces the water. But such a scenario is extremely unlikely, and in a typical case only a small quantity of water may accumulate at the bottom of the rear end of the hulls, that is far behind the driver.
This said, it wouldn’t hurt to have a bucket on board, as an addition to the solution that we recommend, which is:

4. Hand pump

A 36″ long, lightweight hand pump costs $29 at Lowe’s.
It allows to pump water from the rear end of the hulls while the user sits facing forward. This is a major advantage, ergonomically speaking, and in simple terms of convenience.
The pump provides a sturdy, simple, and easy to operate solution that you can count on. The piston is lubricated by the water itself, and this makes pumping easy. Capacity wise, four strokes bail out one gallon, and since it’s hard to imagine having to bail out more than a few gallons at a time, the effort required is almost negligible.
The pump features a simple filter at its end, and this prevents it from getting jammed.
If there is a perfect solution, we think this is it.

Manual bilge pump for fishing kayak 36 inch

Manual bilge pump, 36″ long

First impression from our Wavewalk 700

By Jon Cohen

Massachusetts

My W700 arrived on last Monday. My son wanted to head out to the nearest pond straight away but the rain put a stop to that. The weather was much improved on Wednesday afternoon so we headed out for our first trip! We carried the boat out of the house (happy wife 🙂 ) and easily loaded it on top of our SUV. I ran nylon tie-down straps through the pad eyes and secured the boat to the rack.
We arrived at the pond, removed the straps and had the W700 in the water in 5 minutes.
My son and I stepped in and pushed off from the shore. Good call on recommending the 9′ paddle. Paddling was easy. So easy that my 13 year old volunteered to take over.
There was a fair amount of wind but it didn’t seem to cause us any problems. We spent a very comfortable (no back ache) hour on the pond, stepped out (dry of course) and loaded the boat back on our SUV in no time.
My son decided he was cold so he headed in to the house as soon as we got back home leaving me to remove the boat from the SUV. No problem! It is so easy to handle. I took it down and slid it across my yard to the storage area at the back of my house.
We’ve been out three times so far and I already caught my first fish of the season!
Looking forward to many more fishing trips in my W!

 

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Roomy cockpit for two anglers

 

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