Tag Archive: cockpit cover

A cockpit cover is any piece of waterproof fabric or plastic material that can be used to cover the top part of a kayak’s cockpit, and prevent or limit water from getting in, whether from spray, rain, eddies etc.

Boat cover for the Wavewalk S4

Keeping your motorized kayak or motorboat outside, motor on and ready to launch anytime, requires some protection from rain. The simple solution is a cover made from a polyethylene tarp attached with shock cords (bungees).
This tarp covers the S4 outboard motor and motor, including the full size spray shield.
Adding a few grommets to the tarp offers more precision in tailoring it to fit the boat.

Simple and effective, easy, and inexpensive.

PFD, anchor, manual bilge pump, fuel can and paddles are all stored on board, in the hulls.

 

Motorized Wavewalk S4 kayak boat ready to slide down to the beach for a quick launch

My Wavewalk 700

By Joanne Campbell

Massachusetts

Just wanted to let you know a few people have asked where to get the Wavewalk, so I hope you get some orders!
Having a great time with it, and I have mastered maneuvering it!

This is the custom cover I ordered for my Wavewalk 700. It is easy to flip the water off the cover since it is a very sturdy “Sunbrella” fabric.
I unsnap it only halfway when going out, and tuck it down on one side. It is working out great, and
keeping things dry and void of debris.

 

Keeping the cockpit of your Wavewalk dry at sea

When you paddle your Wavewalk in waves without covering the front end of its cockpit, some spray may get inside, especially if you paddle through big surf. The water is drained to the bottom of the hulls, and it flows backwards to the rear part of the hull tips. Altogether, this is rather insignificant.

When you drive a motorized Wavewalk in the ocean for a long time, at high speed and through waves, your boat generates more spray, and breaking waves can result in more water getting into the cockpit. A Spray Shield works to minimize intake from the front, but not from the sides. Some water may accumulate on the bottom of the hulls, at the rear end of the boat. A few gallons of water would be unnoticed, but having effective means to remove any amount of water at any time is highly recommended, simply because stuff happens, and you’d better be well prepared for any case.

Comparing different solutions

1. One-way valves

Many motorboats and sailing boats feature one-way valves at the rear end of their hulls. When the boat moves in the water at high speed, the low pressure behind its stern causes the valve to open, and pulls out the water that accumulated at the bottom of the hull, namely the bilge.
A hull outfitted with such a valve is called ‘self bailing’.
Needless to say that SOT kayaks described by their manufacturers as “self bailing” are not, and the misuse of this term is misleading.

After much consideration, we decided not to outfit the hulls of the Wavewalk with such valves, for two reasons, which are:

  • Unlike big motorboats, a Wavewalk can be dragged on the ground and over rocks, and this might damage the valves.
  • One-way valves can get jammed, and since the Wavewalk often goes in shallow water that’s mixed with sand and mud, and where vegetation can be abundant, the possibility of such malfunction cannot be disregarded.

2. Electric bilge pump

Battery recharged on board –
Some small outboard gas motors (e.g. Tohatsu, starting at 4 HP) offer the option to add an alternator (electric current generator) and an AC to DC converter. Thus, the motor continuously produces an electric current that can charge a battery that would power an electric bilge pump and/or an electric trolling motor.
This solution sounds perfect – just press or turn an electric switch, and bail the water out. And if you get an automatic pump, you don’t even have to remember to activate it.
But a closer look at the details of this solution revels some problems:

  • Cost – The combined cost of an alternator and converter is around $450. The cost of a battery and an electric bilge pump would bring the total cost of this solution to over $500. It may not be a prohibitive price, but it’s still a considerable sum in the context of a Wavewalk boat.
  • Vulnerability – Keeping a battery and electric pump somewhere in your Wavewalk may not be enough, and you’d need to secure both, so that in case of an accident they would remain inside the cockpit and be fully operational when needed the most. This could prove to be somehow hard to achieve.

Battery not rechargeable on board-
An electric bilge pump powered by a battery that isn’t being continuously charged makes sense, because unlike propelling the boat, pumping a few gallons of water out of its hulls require little power.
The downside of this simple solution is having to remember to charge the battery before each motorized trip offshore, and the possibility that in case of an accident the system could stop working.

3. Hand bucket

Simply a square bucket with a handle (or without one) that fits into a Wavewalk hull, and used as a bilge bucket.
It works, but only in case there is a lot of water in the hull, namely that the water is deep enough, and the user faces the water. But such a scenario is extremely unlikely, and in a typical case only a small quantity of water may accumulate at the bottom of the rear end of the hulls, that is far behind the driver.
This said, it wouldn’t hurt to have a bucket on board, as an addition to the solution that we recommend, which is:

4. Hand pump

A 36″ long, lightweight hand pump costs $29 at Lowe’s.
It allows to pump water from the rear end of the hulls while the user sits facing forward. This is a major advantage, ergonomically speaking, and in simple terms of convenience.
The pump provides a sturdy, simple, and easy to operate solution that you can count on. The piston is lubricated by the water itself, and this makes pumping easy. Capacity wise, four strokes bail out one gallon, and since it’s hard to imagine having to bail out more than a few gallons at a time, the effort required is almost negligible.
The pump features a simple filter at its end, and this prevents it from getting jammed.
If there is a perfect solution, we think this is it.

Manual bilge pump for fishing kayak 36 inch

Manual bilge pump, 36″ long

W570 with a 6 hp Tohatsu outboard motor

Why overpower this fishing kayak with a 6 hp outboard motor?

Earlier this year, Kenny One-Shot Tracy outfitted his W500 kayak with side flotation and a 6 hp Tohatsu outboard motor, and showed it going at 13 mph. This was intriguing, and several months later, after we came up with the W570 series for offshore fishing, we wanted to test it with a similar motor.
A W kayak weigh 60 lbs and it’s rated for 2-3 hp motors, so it goes without saying that using it with a 6 hp motor means overpowering it, since these motors are rated for moving boats up to 3,000 lbs, that is 50 times heavier.
However, testing and experimenting are part of any Research and Development (R&D) process, and we try as much as we can to test our products under various conditions in order to better understand possibilities, problems, and hazards, and inform our clients about them, so they have more options to choose from, and can make better decisions.

Tohatsu America showed interested in this project and cooperated with us through their dealer Steve’s Marine in Rhode Island, and we got the 6 hp Tohatsu motor (20″ shaft) in late October.

beached motorized kayak

Wavewalk 570 beached.

 

Driving-a-motorized-fishing-kayak-640

 

Watch the movie –

Motor weight and handling considerations

Although the 6 hp (20″ long shaft) Tohatsu is a sophisticated outboard motor, it is relatively lightweight for its class. However, at 59 lbs it still weighs twice more than the 2-2.3 hp Honda outboard that we’ve routinely used so far.  This additional weight was our first concern, and we wanted to experience what it means for a W kayak angler who uses such a motor.
We found the weight difference to be noticeable, but not a major issue – It’s possible to carry such a motor over short distances, whether on its own or mounted on the kayak. Dragging the kayak on a sandy beach was considerably more difficult, but not a big problem over a short distance.
Lifting the motor into the car wasn’t too hard either.

Transporting the boat in the car

Click images to enlarge –

 

The boat on the beach and at the dock

Launching is easy both from the beach and from a dock, and the same is true for beaching.

Click images to enlarge –

The motor mount

Kenny reported that his 6 hp Tohatsu outboard had broken a DIY motor mount. Such accidents can be dangerous, so we knew that we had to consider both weight and power. Kenny later reported that his 6 hp motor worked with the TMM 20 motor mount that we had sent him, but we preferred to beef up a TMM 20-15 motor mount with an additional 3/4″ board for its vertical mounting plate, making it 1.5″ thick.

The boat itself

Another concern we had about the 6 hp motor’s weight was how our W570 would take it.
The following pictures show that we had no reason to be concerned, as the boat is pretty much level, and the side flotation modules rest several inches above waterline –

motorized fishing kayak

motorized fishing kayak

Rear view of a docked Wavewalk 570 INF 20-15 outfitted with both a spray shield and cockpit cover, and an extra inflatable flotation module attached between its hulls.

Driving the boat

Driving the boat with the 6 hp Tohatsu / 20″ shaft was easy and convenient.
This outboard motor features a 3 position gear system (Forward-Neutral-Reverse) that’s safer than a centrifugal clutch, and makes it easy to start any time. The fact that this motor is water cooled makes it relatively quiet in comparison with the air cooled 2-2.3 hp Honda.
Access to the motor’s controls is easy and convenient once you slide backward on the saddle all the way to the back of the cockpit.
The inflatable flotation modules stayed above waterline and did not cause splashing.

Load and additional passengers

Although a W kayak can carry heavier loads, we rate these kayaks for a total load of 360 lbs, for both safety and performance reasons. This number includes everything that the boat may carry, from passengers and their personal belongings to fishing gear, an anchor, and last but not least – a motor. With a 60 lbs motor and all the extra accessories that come with the Wavewalk 570, and considering the high speed in which you’re likely to drive, it would be safer to consider the W570 as a one-person motorized kayak, or a solo skiff, if you prefer. This is unless the user is not heavy, and they take a lightweight passenger on board. For example: A driver that weighs less than 200 lbs could take on board a small child weighing 60 lbs, plus some lightweight fishing tackle.

Fuel consumption

The 6 hp Tohatsu outboard model that we’ve tested features an integral fuel tank that allows it to go for 45 minutes full throttle, but as long as you drive a W570 with it you won’t go over 1/3 throttle since doing so is likely to increase your speed dangerously, unless you’re towing a bigger boat or several kayaks and canoes.

Accident

In one occasion, while the boat was going pretty fast, the propeller hit a rock on the bottom of the lake, and got ejected out of the water, as it’s designed to do in such cases. Lowering it back into the water presented no problem. The reinforced TMM 20-15 transom mount didn’t budge, and the inflatable side flotation proved that it’s useful in helping to prevent the boat from rolling (flipping) if it’s tilting strongly as it did following the impact and momentary loss of control that resulted from it.
The role that the inflatable flotation played in that accident emphasizes its importance.

Power and speed

A W kayak outfitted with a 2-2.3 hp outboard can go at 8.5 mph, full throttle, while the same kayak outfitted with a 6 hp Tohatsu motor can reach 13 mph at 1/3 throttle, a speed that for most people makes it too much of a challenge to drive safely. This is where we found that a 6 hp motor wasn’t the best fit for the Wavewalk 570. In other words, overpowering the W570 with such a powerful motor can be hazardous and cause accidents if you drive too fast relatively to your boating skills and/or to water conditions, or if you accidentally accelerate abruptly or even just too quickly for you to safely maintain control over the vessel.
This lightweight craft is no match for the power and torque of such a big engine, and that makes it too ‘nervous’ compared to when it’s outfitted with a smaller and less powerful motor that tks longer to accelerate.

Why you might want to overpower

Having said that, you might like this overpowered configuration if you’re a risk-loving speed fan who enjoys the feeling of danger. It’s your choice, as long as you’re aware of the safety hazards, and you know that the W570 isn’t rated for motors that are more powerful than 2-3 hp.

A more productive way to make use of such a disproportionally powerful motor could be for towing other boats. For example, if you use the W570 as tender (auxiliary service boat) for a bigger leisure craft such as a sailboat, it could tow the mother ship, if necessary, or tow another tender with several passengers and provisions on board (e.g. an inflatable dinghy).
If indeed you’re thinking about such use, make sure the towed craft are properly attached to your W570, and don’t use its handles or eyelets for this purpose.
Similarly, if you go on a camping and fishing trip in which several people take part, your W570 on steroids could tow several kayaks and canoes over long distances, and make life easier for the other members of your expedition.

If you’re thinking about driving up fast rivers, such as in springtime, or on fast tidal rivers, more power and torque may be justified, although it’s hard to imagine cases where a 2-3 hp motor would not suffice for your W kayak. Just remember that fast moving rivers are hazardous, and we recommend neither paddling nor motorizing in them.

Another case in which you could be interested to use a 6 hp outboard motor with your W570 is if you already own a larger boat that you propel with such a motor, and you want to alternate between your W570 and that bigger boat. For example, you may prefer to go fishing on your own in the W570, and take the bigger boat when you fish with your family and friends. If you don’t like to purchase a smaller outboard for your W570, you could try using your 6 hp outboard with it, and see how it works for you. If it does, it could save you the additional expense on a small motor. Just remember to be very cautious with the throttle when the motor is mounted on your W570.

Rating

All the above said does not imply that we rate the W570 for use with an outboard motor that’s more powerful than 2-3 hp, because we don’t. We think that using a W kayak with motors that are more powerful than 2-3 hp could be hazardous.
Again, the purpose of this article is to inform people about what using much stronger motors implies, and warn them about problems and dangers associated with such practice.

More reading

Motorized kayaks »

Driving the W570 in the ocean »

The New Wavewalk 570 Series (W570) 2015 Models »