Tag Archive: carrying

Carrying a kayak by hand, or with a wheel cart, over a distance, usually from a car to a launching spot, and back.

Compact wheel set for transporting the Wavewalk S4

By Joe Stauder

HBBCO Stand Up Fishing Kayaks, PA

I got busy designing a compact wheel set-up for the S4.
The cool thing is that’s it’s designed to work on the front or the back of the S4, depending on the owner’s preference.
And it packs up and fits into one of the tunnel hulls, so it goes along for the ride.

Wave walking around the neighborhood

Just a short video shot while driving my S4 around the corner…

 

Couple observations –
This 6 HP outboard is no 10 HP, and this 8″ pitch prop is no 9″ pitch 😀
Driving this little boat in the chop is super easy and fun, whether it’s against the wind, in lateral waves, or in a following sea.

Wide wheels for Wavewalk S4 motor kayak skiff

I live close to the water, and I need to transport my motorized Wavewalk S4 over mildly rough terrain, and a sandy beach. The outboard motor I use is a 6 HP Tohatsu that weighs close to 60 lbs, so carrying it by hand is not easy.
Therefore, I had to make a trolley that features wheels that are bother high and wide. The trolley also needed to be transported on board the S4 without taking too much space.

I made a simple wheel cart from a pair of 13″ high and 6.5″ wide flat-free (non inflatable) wheels, and 3/4″ stainless steel tube mounted on a 1/2″ thick plywood board. This structure is attached to the S4 by means of straps.
The plywood board features a small wooden extension in its center. This extension fits in the first, widest slot in the S4’s front deck, and it allows to easily attach the wheel cart vertically, by means of a single shock cord (bungee).

Launching with this trolley is easy, and so is getting the wheels under the kayak after beaching.

 

The plywood is coated with two layers of urethane that protect it from the water.

 

Pulling is done either by holding one of the two molded-in front carry handles, or a strap attached to them.

 

Since these wheels are, big, another thing that this wheel cart offers is to run the outboard motor in a bin filled with freshwater, in order to rinse the salt out of it. This way, the motor can stay attached to the boat, and be clean of the salt.

This setup is enough to let the motor run in freshwater for a few minutes

I guess some readers may ask if this wheel cart offers the front passenger some protection from spray when the S4 moves in waves, and the answer is that it does offer a little protection compared to having nothing there.

Testing the Wavewalk S4 in our maiden offshore voyage

By Magnus Chung

San Francisco Bay Area, California

I finally got a chance to take the S4 out and test it on the water. It’s working beautifully with the Honda 2.3 engine. We actually have 3 people seat in it comfortably and both paddling and using the motor works quite well.

We launched the S4 at a rocky beach, and dragging the S4 over the sharp rocks caused some scratches on the bottom of the S4. This is a minor issue, and I’ve decided not to worry about it 🙂

Overall, I am very satisfied with the S4. Great Kayak and I can’t wait to show it off to my friends on the next fishing trip!

I was too busy with the S4. There aren’t any pics while the S4 is cruising in the water since all three of us were in the S4 and didn’t have anyone to take pictures from the shore.
Here are some of the pics my friend took on the beach –

 

 

 

UPDATE – August 2018

I have been taking the S4 to many fishing and clamming trips and it’s working great and impressed a lot of people!
A couple times we encountered bigger than expected swells so if it wasn’t the S4, we would have tipped over for sure. Most of the people who ride on it confirmed the S4 is the most stable kayak compared to everything they have seen.
One small thing I noticed is that when we have close to max load on the S4 in the bigger waves, the water splashes front and gets in the cockpit, so I think the splash shield may help with this.