Tag Archive: anchor

Anchor used for kayak fishing

Simple anchoring for Wavewalk fishing kayaks

By Gary Rankel

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club

 

A few years ago, not knowing any better, I submitted a short piece showing how to install an anchor trolley on my Wavewalk 500.
Having had 10 years experience and hundreds of fishing trips in my Wavewalk fishing machines, I’ve come up with a number of ideas to simplify rigging the W for fishing, one of which makes the anchor trolley idea obsolete.
While anchor trolleys are useful additions on mono hull yaks, the twin hull design of the W offers a much easier alternative.

All that is required are 2 holes drilled into the fore and aft cockpit rims (ignore the third middle hole in the photo used for another purpose), through which cords, knotted on each end, are attached.
Simply attach a plastic snap clip onto both the cord and anchor rope and “anchors away”. Deploy the anchor to the front or rear depending on which way the current is flowing. This is about as simple as it gets, with no banging of hardware on the W to spook fish.

This arrangement works with the W700 as well, however, the deck mount will prevent it from working on the front of the new S4.

Hope this helps Wavewalk users looking for a simple anchoring fix.

 

 

Read more about Gary’s kayak fishing trips »

 

Read Gary’s review of his Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak »

Anchor solution for the W700 fishing boat

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Key Largo, Florida

I did not know how to post a pic on a blog. But, this is one simple solution to Dario’s problem securing an anchor line. Two rod holders are included in the mix.
This is a mega-cleat with 2 rod holders and a 1 kg Lewmar claw anchor. No holes were drilled in the W700…

 

Anchor, and DIY dual rod holder

Anchor, and DIY dual rod holder

 

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

One step at a time

By Dario Lazaric

Melbourne, Australia

I haven’t been in a lot of kayaks before.
I’ve been out with my wavewalk a couple of times, even caught a fish. Stood up, paddled, good fun.
It was tough paddling against the wind and waves, but I’m very happy with it, and it can do much more than in the conditions I took it out in.
Will take it out again sometime when the wind isn’t too strong. I want to get the motor on board as well, but one step at a time. I need to get an anchor, how do I attach it?
Very happy with it. I feel very safe and happy in the wavewalk.

 

walking-the-kayak-to-the-water

 

first-time-out-in-the-W700

 

mercury-4hp-outboard-motor

4 hp mercury outboard. Fitting the transom mount

 

outboard-propeller-draft

20″ propeller shaft

 

wheels-for-motorized-kayak

Will need wheels to carry the wavewalk to the beach with the motor attached to it.


More from Dario »

 

That Cat in the Yak Catching a Cool Crowd of Catfish

Captain Larry Jarboe

Yesterday, I took advantage of a calm, relatively warm day in December to make a morning run to Mallows Bay on the Potomac.
The fog was just lifting as I launched the W500.

I canoe style paddled past the “Ghost Ship” and anchored in the flats just inside the river channel north of the mouth of Mallows Bay Creek. The incoming tide was as I had planned according to the Mayland DNR “Tide Finder” tables.
Pretty soon, I was hooking up and using my rubber boots to push the Blue Cats behind me which was in the forward “foc’scles” of the twin hulls.

Sliding the big cats past my legs was a challenge in the Wavewalk but would have been impossible in a cockpit style kayak. A SOT kayak would have capsized.

I looked back after catching a Baker’s Dozen of medium to big Blue Catfish and noticed the tips of my W500 front hulls were touching the surface of the river.

The tide was still coming in as I eased up the anchor and gingerly paddled home with a couple hundred pounds of catfish chilling in the cat-a-yak.

Got a bigger boat coming. A W700.

mist-on-the-potomac-river

Fog on the river

 

25 lbs and 30 lbs catfish

25 and 30 lbs catfish

 

200 lbs of catfish

200 lbs of catfish – a boatload

 

a boatload of cat fish

Fishing cat hulls stuffed with catfish

 

another-blue-catfish

Big one hooked

 

catfish-hooked

Another big one

 

ghost-ship-boat

“Ghost Ship” boat

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

Pufferbelly fish saves the day

By Jill Toler

I had a successful first kayak fishing trip so I decided to up the stakes and try a fishing trip in an area that has tidal current and possibly wind. Who am I kidding, more like probably wind. I checked the forecast that indicated the wind would blow WNW 5-10 mph. You would think after all these years of experience with forecast vs. actual wind speeds that I would know better. Always add at least 5 mph to the forecast, then add another 5 just for good measure. Still, I would not be deterred and decided to try fishing at the Harker’s Island bridge. Specks [speckled sea trout] were being caught and I wanted in on the action.

Fishing Buddy and I made a plan to meet at the foot of the bridge. I was running about 10 minutes behind because my little dog, June Bug, did not want to come back into the house on such a beautiful morning. After all, there are marvelous things happening in the backyard at 7:50 am…

I arrived at the destination and as I crossed the bridge I spotted Fishing Buddy already on the water and hooked up with a fish. I had been nervous for two days anticipating what it would be like to deal with wind and tide. When I realized that I was on my own getting unloaded, geared up, and paddling to the fishing spot I sort of got scared and began doubting my ability. I actually went out a little ways and turned right back around for the shore to calm my nerves. A few deep breaths and words of encouragement from myself found me paddling away from security and right into chaos. Not only would there be wind and tide, but there would be boat traffic and wakes. I managed to pick my way through boats and make it over to where Fishing Buddy was catching a fish on just about every cast. I thought, “this is going to be epic!” I chose the wrong word for the coming experience.

Anchoring in a kayak is way different than anchoring in a boat. I’m glad that I installed that anchor trolley, but I would have been more happy had I actually learned how it works prior to being smack dab in the middle of the excitement. To say that it took me a while to get the anchor deployed, set, and secured so as to position my kayak in the direction that I needed would be a major understatement. There is a lot to learn of kayak fishing.

Finally, the anchor was set and by sending it towards the back of the kayak the wind or tide or something turned me right around so that I was facing the action and not staring at the beautiful homes along the shoreline. I was able to make a cast and hooked right up…….with a pufferbelly. Some folks call them blowtoads, blowfish, puffers, etc. I call them, “I ain’t getting skunked today!”

Somehow, my fly line got wrapped up in my reel and just as my luck would have it, the bite shut down by the time I got everything straightened out. I tried a few more spots, but no takers.

It wasn’t the worst day because I did catch one fish and I challenged myself. I learned a lot that day and will make some adjustments for my next trip and will be better prepared for the adventure.

At lunch, Fishing Buddy told me that I did very well considering the wind, tide, and boat traffic. She also said that she had a heck of a time staying in position and that it was a tough day to fly fish from a kayak. I went, I saw, I learned, and I can’t wait to do it again.

 


 

More fly fishing from Jill’s W700 »