Tag Archive: anchor trolley

An anchor trolley is used to operate a fishing kayak’s anchor from different locations along the kayak’s side

Getting ready to motorize my Wavewalk 700

By Cliff Robbins

Delaware

I love my W700 WaveWalk, it’s a great product. I get a lot of attention from other fisherman and kayakers.
I have a transom mount for a motor, anchor trolley and 4 rod holders mounted on the rear.
Can’t wait to put a motor on it.

Simple anchoring for Wavewalk fishing kayaks

By Gary Rankel

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club

 

A few years ago, not knowing any better, I submitted a short piece showing how to install an anchor trolley on my Wavewalk 500.
Having had 10 years experience and hundreds of fishing trips in my Wavewalk fishing machines, I’ve come up with a number of ideas to simplify rigging the W for fishing, one of which makes the anchor trolley idea obsolete.
While anchor trolleys are useful additions on mono hull yaks, the twin hull design of the W offers a much easier alternative.

All that is required are 2 holes drilled into the fore and aft cockpit rims (ignore the third middle hole in the photo used for another purpose), through which cords, knotted on each end, are attached.
Simply attach a plastic snap clip onto both the cord and anchor rope and “anchors away”. Deploy the anchor to the front or rear depending on which way the current is flowing. This is about as simple as it gets, with no banging of hardware on the W to spook fish.

This arrangement works with the W700 as well, however, the deck mount will prevent it from working on the front of the new S4.

Hope this helps Wavewalk users looking for a simple anchoring fix.

 

 

Read more about Gary’s kayak fishing trips »

 

Read Gary’s review of his Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak »

Pufferbelly fish saves the day

By Jill Toler

I had a successful first kayak fishing trip so I decided to up the stakes and try a fishing trip in an area that has tidal current and possibly wind. Who am I kidding, more like probably wind. I checked the forecast that indicated the wind would blow WNW 5-10 mph. You would think after all these years of experience with forecast vs. actual wind speeds that I would know better. Always add at least 5 mph to the forecast, then add another 5 just for good measure. Still, I would not be deterred and decided to try fishing at the Harker’s Island bridge. Specks [speckled sea trout] were being caught and I wanted in on the action.

Fishing Buddy and I made a plan to meet at the foot of the bridge. I was running about 10 minutes behind because my little dog, June Bug, did not want to come back into the house on such a beautiful morning. After all, there are marvelous things happening in the backyard at 7:50 am…

I arrived at the destination and as I crossed the bridge I spotted Fishing Buddy already on the water and hooked up with a fish. I had been nervous for two days anticipating what it would be like to deal with wind and tide. When I realized that I was on my own getting unloaded, geared up, and paddling to the fishing spot I sort of got scared and began doubting my ability. I actually went out a little ways and turned right back around for the shore to calm my nerves. A few deep breaths and words of encouragement from myself found me paddling away from security and right into chaos. Not only would there be wind and tide, but there would be boat traffic and wakes. I managed to pick my way through boats and make it over to where Fishing Buddy was catching a fish on just about every cast. I thought, “this is going to be epic!” I chose the wrong word for the coming experience.

Anchoring in a kayak is way different than anchoring in a boat. I’m glad that I installed that anchor trolley, but I would have been more happy had I actually learned how it works prior to being smack dab in the middle of the excitement. To say that it took me a while to get the anchor deployed, set, and secured so as to position my kayak in the direction that I needed would be a major understatement. There is a lot to learn of kayak fishing.

Finally, the anchor was set and by sending it towards the back of the kayak the wind or tide or something turned me right around so that I was facing the action and not staring at the beautiful homes along the shoreline. I was able to make a cast and hooked right up…….with a pufferbelly. Some folks call them blowtoads, blowfish, puffers, etc. I call them, “I ain’t getting skunked today!”

Somehow, my fly line got wrapped up in my reel and just as my luck would have it, the bite shut down by the time I got everything straightened out. I tried a few more spots, but no takers.

It wasn’t the worst day because I did catch one fish and I challenged myself. I learned a lot that day and will make some adjustments for my next trip and will be better prepared for the adventure.

At lunch, Fishing Buddy told me that I did very well considering the wind, tide, and boat traffic. She also said that she had a heck of a time staying in position and that it was a tough day to fly fish from a kayak. I went, I saw, I learned, and I can’t wait to do it again.

 


 

More fly fishing from Jill’s W700 »

Saltwater Gear Maintenance

By Jeff McGovern

Kayaks are king in saltwater flats fishing. You can get into places that even the finest flats boats have trouble accessing. You have no fuel expense and the maintenance on the kayak is far less than any motor powered craft. However, saltwater is not kind to equipment of any type, so unless your gear is properly cleaned up after every trip, it will wear out quickly and be ruined.

Cleaning equipment for fishing gear

The process begins on the water in the way gear is handled.  Lures should never be replaced in the tackle box directly after use.  They need to be placed in a separate plastic container that is for used baits only.  The small amounts of saltwater on the lure can be transferred into your tackle box as baits are changed out and that small amount ruins a box of lures in very short order.
Once you arrive home, the baits in the plastic container need to be cleaned.  My own method for taking care of this is to add a squirt of baby shampoo to the container and fill it with tap water.  A few shakes, a simple brush off with an old tooth brush to get the crud, a tap water rinse and the lures are finally hung to dry before replacing in the tackle box.  The reason for the recommendation of baby shampoo is that it rinses fully in cooler water and it has no other substances in it other than simple soaps.  It won’t harm your tackle and it’s inexpensive.

Washing off saltwater from the deck gear

All equipment from the day should be cleaned up as soon as you get home.  The boat is easy: some people just spray it off and put it up.  I take a few extra minutes with mine and use a soapy water wash down with one of the all-in-one car wash products.  My paddles, net, anchor, and other on board gear is done at the same time and allowed to dry before being stored.  Stainless rigging such as on my anchor trolley will rust in time with continued saltwater use if I don’t clean it each time.

Hand washing the lures

Rod and reel are ruined if they are not thoroughly cleaned after saltwater use.   There are different ideas for this process, but the one I use has kept my gear in working order for years.  I have rods and reels pushing 40 years old that are still fine, work great and I owe it to my cleanup methods.  I start by clipping the line and removing the leaders.  The line is then secured to the spool clips or, in the case of bait casters, to the reel frame.  Reels are removed from the rods before cleaning.  The rods are wet down and washed off using the car wash cleaner and mesh scrubby.  It’s light cleaning not a harsh scrub and will not damage the guides or wraps on the rods.  Once rinsed, the rods are put aside to dry.

Cleaning the plug

The reels are washed off using the baby shampoo on a wet wash cloth.  The idea is to just wash the reel off, not soak it.  Rinsing is done with another wash cloth and tap water.  Do not spray off the reel – it forces salty material into the reel and destroys it from the inside.  Once the reel is rinsed off it gets a spray of furniture polish.  It won’t hurt anything (including the line.)  After the spray down of furniture polish it is wiped clean.  At this point, lubrication of the parts (like the level wind worm gear on the bait casting reel) can be done before storage.

Take care of your gear after every trip and it will last for years.  Put it up without cleaning and you’ll be the tackle store’s best customer..

Jeff

 

Copyright (C) Jeff McGovern, 2007-2015

Read more about Jeff’s kayak fishing trips, tips and observations »

New rigging and fish pics

By Ray Schwertner

Here are some rigging pictures (latest) of my boat. Note how the console with the seat can be easily lifted out and replaced in one of three forward or rearward positions. You can mount your stuff on it. The “u” brackets made this possible.

I show the pivot up and down transducer in the rear and the screen on the front motor console/step combination.

The PVC rod holders work great especially for bass fishing where you need them handy, but not in the way. A lot easier to reach than the rear mount standard holders..which are still used on occasion to hold the anchor or a rod. (When you put a rod in it, it can get hung on tree limbs or sometimes it would hit it with my casting rod.

I discarded the anchor trolley from my early days. You can see a wind up cleat on the console that goes to a pulley. If I need to adjust for wind direction, I just hang the rope over a cleat on the from, or back or side.

I think you could offer a drop in console with a seat option and maybe place to mount other items the user may want.

The trolley really works great… as you can see it fits inside the saddle space. You just raise up the W, push it under to catch the first or second rib, then raise it a little more an push it forward to get the second upright positioned on a rib further to the front. I tried to use a flexible design that you could fold, but to hard and too unstable. As you can see my trolley is fixed and strong enough to support the weight of the W and it accessories.

I think a customized trolley similar to this design would be a great accessory for you to sell, in addition to the console and maybe and electric motor mount. I just don’t get the folks who are powered up with gas outboard. But to each his own…

Finally the rope I am holding just comes out of a hole I drilled to keep it off the deck… My hooks have a way of finding the ropes that are nearby. That causes a lot of lost fishing time.

This fish are two black crappie. One other one got off before I got him welcomed aboard. Caught them on a 3/8 oz lipless crank bait called “Diamond Dust” from Academy spots. Usually a good bass lure but I have been catching crappie like these recently.

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Black Crappie

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DIY horizontal rod holder

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DIY horizontal rod holder

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Seat backrest in upward position

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Seat backrest folded down

 

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Front mount for trolling motor

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Rigged fishing kayak with front mounted trolling motor – top front view

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Front mounted trolling motor

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Tackle box on deck

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Tackle box on deck

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Fish finder transducer in high position

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Fish finder transducer in low position

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More DIY outfitting projects and fishing reports from Ray »