Tag Archive: anchor system

A system for anchoring a fishing kayak or a small boat

Simple anchoring for Wavewalk fishing kayaks

By Gary Rankel

Nature Coast Kayak Fishers Club

 

A few years ago, not knowing any better, I submitted a short piece showing how to install an anchor trolley on my Wavewalk 500.
Having had 10 years experience and hundreds of fishing trips in my Wavewalk fishing machines, I’ve come up with a number of ideas to simplify rigging the W for fishing, one of which makes the anchor trolley idea obsolete.
While anchor trolleys are useful additions on mono hull yaks, the twin hull design of the W offers a much easier alternative.

All that is required are 2 holes drilled into the fore and aft cockpit rims (ignore the third middle hole in the photo used for another purpose), through which cords, knotted on each end, are attached.
Simply attach a plastic snap clip onto both the cord and anchor rope and “anchors away”. Deploy the anchor to the front or rear depending on which way the current is flowing. This is about as simple as it gets, with no banging of hardware on the W to spook fish.

This arrangement works with the W700 as well, however, the deck mount will prevent it from working on the front of the new S4.

Hope this helps Wavewalk users looking for a simple anchoring fix.

 

 

Read more about Gary’s kayak fishing trips »

 

Read Gary’s review of his Wavewalk 500 fishing kayak »

W700 Outfitted for Catching Catfish

By Captain Larry Jarboe

I took some time off on Saturday from setting up my Chesapeake Fish Camp and Wavewalk friends and family demos to make a run to Mallows Bay on the Potomac River.
In this shallow cove, resides the largest shipwreck graveyard in the Western Hemisphere. There is a beautiful park and public boat launch.
Though the catfish are spread out in the river and up the creeks, you can still catch a mess of catfish if you fish the right tide with the right bait.

The four way removable PVC spreader rod holder rig / anchor line cleat helps put enough baits all around the boat to tickle their whiskers.

8 Blue Cats and 3 Channel Cats did not come close to loading up the W700. But, they will make a fine fish fry.

Just wait till November when the big Blue Cats are lined up at the edge of the channel waiting for me to return…

Looking forward to summer Wavewalk adventures in the Keys.

Wavewalk 700 with four rod holders and a cutting board for bait

 

Wavewalk 700 next to shipwreck

 

Various catfish at the bottom of the hull

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

My initial observations on the Wavewalk 700

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Key Largo, Florida

A couple days ago, I launched my W700 for the first time. It has taken a couple weeks to get my stone crab traps set up and dropped overboard from my commercial fishing boat “Line Dancer”. This vessel, a 27′ Lindsey w/ a B-series Cummins diesel, will make a fine mother ship to transport the W700 and my W500 to the Everglades, wrecks, reefs, and Gulf Stream waters surrounding Key Largo.

My initial observations include:

The W700 is the ideal family or couples vessel for economy and ease of transport. Where will you find a tandem yak that combines the best qualities of a kayak, canoe, catamaran, stand-up paddle board, and micro-skiff in one boat?

The W700 really is a magic boat. Not only is the W700 more stable and roomy than the W500 (which was the most stable yak I had previously used), the air tight buoyancy straddle seat is a major safety improvement. The center holes in the separately molded flotation seat can be used as rod holders. I plan to install a removable PVC post in one to hold a waterproof GoPro camera for videos.

Though a double paddle works fine to propel the W700, I prefer to use a canoe paddle. The W700 and W500 Wavewalks actually solo paddle easier than a canoe but you should know the J-stroke, sweep stroke, and other canoe paddling techniques to use a canoe paddle effectively.

Presently, I do not intend to make major mods to the W700. But, in time, there will be fore and aft motor brackets for both gas and electric motors as well as an anchor bracket and rod holders.

It is obvious, that the W700 is a great addition to the Wavewalk series but the W500 will travel with me up and down the East Coast from the Chesapeake to the Keys by truck bed or car top. The W500 is more portable for a solo yakker. Thus, it still has an important place in the product line.

I know many of the Wavewalk owners have put away their vessels for the winter. But, the temperature in the Keys is in the 70 degree range and the skies are mostly blue and sunny. So, there is still great fishing and boating to be found here in the Caribbean of the U.S.

 

pot-full-of-crab-claws

 

Wavewalk 700 on mother ship

 

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »

More reviews of the W700 and W500 »

Pufferbelly fish saves the day

By Jill Toler

I had a successful first kayak fishing trip so I decided to up the stakes and try a fishing trip in an area that has tidal current and possibly wind. Who am I kidding, more like probably wind. I checked the forecast that indicated the wind would blow WNW 5-10 mph. You would think after all these years of experience with forecast vs. actual wind speeds that I would know better. Always add at least 5 mph to the forecast, then add another 5 just for good measure. Still, I would not be deterred and decided to try fishing at the Harker’s Island bridge. Specks [speckled sea trout] were being caught and I wanted in on the action.

Fishing Buddy and I made a plan to meet at the foot of the bridge. I was running about 10 minutes behind because my little dog, June Bug, did not want to come back into the house on such a beautiful morning. After all, there are marvelous things happening in the backyard at 7:50 am…

I arrived at the destination and as I crossed the bridge I spotted Fishing Buddy already on the water and hooked up with a fish. I had been nervous for two days anticipating what it would be like to deal with wind and tide. When I realized that I was on my own getting unloaded, geared up, and paddling to the fishing spot I sort of got scared and began doubting my ability. I actually went out a little ways and turned right back around for the shore to calm my nerves. A few deep breaths and words of encouragement from myself found me paddling away from security and right into chaos. Not only would there be wind and tide, but there would be boat traffic and wakes. I managed to pick my way through boats and make it over to where Fishing Buddy was catching a fish on just about every cast. I thought, “this is going to be epic!” I chose the wrong word for the coming experience.

Anchoring in a kayak is way different than anchoring in a boat. I’m glad that I installed that anchor trolley, but I would have been more happy had I actually learned how it works prior to being smack dab in the middle of the excitement. To say that it took me a while to get the anchor deployed, set, and secured so as to position my kayak in the direction that I needed would be a major understatement. There is a lot to learn of kayak fishing.

Finally, the anchor was set and by sending it towards the back of the kayak the wind or tide or something turned me right around so that I was facing the action and not staring at the beautiful homes along the shoreline. I was able to make a cast and hooked right up…….with a pufferbelly. Some folks call them blowtoads, blowfish, puffers, etc. I call them, “I ain’t getting skunked today!”

Somehow, my fly line got wrapped up in my reel and just as my luck would have it, the bite shut down by the time I got everything straightened out. I tried a few more spots, but no takers.

It wasn’t the worst day because I did catch one fish and I challenged myself. I learned a lot that day and will make some adjustments for my next trip and will be better prepared for the adventure.

At lunch, Fishing Buddy told me that I did very well considering the wind, tide, and boat traffic. She also said that she had a heck of a time staying in position and that it was a tough day to fly fish from a kayak. I went, I saw, I learned, and I can’t wait to do it again.

 


 

More fly fishing from Jill’s W700 »

DIY stakeout pole for shallow water fishing

By Michael Chesloff

The Issue

Windy days make it tougher to fish from almost any boat (even sailboats) but it is often just something that must be dealt with. The usual solution is to use an anchor, which I have been doing. Truth be told though, I wish there was something quicker and less involved.

Despite watching many YouTube videos where they were used I never thought to try one. Maybe this was because they were usually shown in clips about fishing in saltwater flats or bayous. I am usually in shallow water (less than 6 feet) because I primarily fish for bass but I never made the connection….duh!

Trial by Water

I made a quick prototype so I could experience the pros and cons. Suffice it to say, I was impressed! This was the same day I caught those 3 huge fish in my previous story.

Here is a picture of the pole holding my W500-

Stakeout pole - testing

The wind wasn’t too strong and it worked very well, even though it was only jammed about 6 inches into the mud. The real test came when I went to remove it from the lake bottom; it wasn’t easy!  It took some effort, pulling straight up, to remove it. This told me it should work well in almost any wind that I would choose to fish in.

The Build

The pole is made of only 3 pieces:

  1. A heavy-duty, fiberglass driveway marker, 1/2 inch diameter and 4 1/2 feet long.
  2. A 3 1/2 foot section of a wooden dowel, 1 inch in diameter
  3. A PVC pipe T-connector

Here is a picture of the fiberglass driveway marker-

 

  1. Remove the cap from the fiberglass pole
  2. Drill a 3 inch deep hole in one end of the dowel
  3. Insert the fiberglass pole into the hole with a generous amount of epoxy
  4. Attach the T-connector to the other end of the dowel

The finished project with a piece of pool noodle, a tether and a carabiner attached-

The Conclusion

Why did I wait so long? 🙂

Easy to make, inexpensive and effective. Using it is much easier, quicker and quieter then any anchor, conditions permitting. I highly recommend you make or buy 🙁 one ASAP.