kayak paddling

Paddling is the easiest and most effective form of human powered propulsion for small and lightweight craft such as kayaks and canoes. In recent decades, paddling has become more popular than rowing, and dual-blade paddles (‘kayak’ paddles) have become more popular than single-blade (‘canoeing’) paddles.
Paddling offers a way for the kayaker to propel, control and steer their kayak using one, lightweight and easy to use tool, and this multiple functionality is highly appreciated, especially if the kayak lends itself to easy paddling, which most fishing kayaks don’t, unfortunately. Such kayaks are typically mono-hulled, large-size and heavy, and they track poorly, which is why most of them feature a rudder.
Wavewalk kayaks are easier to paddle since their users benefit from increased stability, the ability to optimally engage their legs substantially in both balancing and paddling efforts, and the advantage of rudderless steering and tracking through relocating the kayak’s center of gravity by simply moving its saddle (longitudinal seat).
In addition, W kayaks offer the average user easy stand up paddling in confidence, in real world conditions, which other kayak don’t.
Typically, paddling traditional (mono-hull) kayaks is done with the paddler sitting in the L position, which is non-ergonomic to a point that it has become associated to back pain. In contrast, paddling W kayak is typically done from a Riding posture similar to the powerful and comfortable position in which drivers of All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV), snowmobiles and jet-skis operate such high-performance vehicles.
W kayaks also offer their users the possibility to apply a broader range of paddle strokes, as well as to use their extra-long paddle for poling in shallow water, such as when launching or beaching, or when going over obstacles.

2018-19 duck hunting season opening with the Wavewalk 700 kayak

By Chris Henderson

 

Went to my little lake where I was the only one hunting. Not much of a flight to speak of but had a couple of opportunities. Eagles are back and ready to be fed, if you can’t paddle fast enough and retrieve the ducks.

 

My kayak paddling and fishing therapy

By John Fabina

 

I had an unfortunate accident this spring that resulted in my hand being crushed. After surgery and pins, my hand is expected to make a full recovery.
Physical therapy was challenging but necessary to return my hand to normal. After a month or so I was able to begin kayaking again in my Wavewalk. The therapist was impressed at my improvement. I explained how paddling seemed to improve my hand strength and dexterity. My surgeon confirmed that it was perfect therapy for many reasons, the most important was that it was an activity I enjoyed.
As time went on , later this summer I was able to fish again. Back to exploring new waters, this time a remote lake in Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I found a few bucketmouths and pike. It was great to be fishing and exploring in my Wavewalk again!

John

 

 

More fishing, paddling, and wildlife photography with John »

Improvements in roof rack, and campout

By Chris Henderson

Northern Tribe Outdoors

I am building my Suburban into an Overlander. My first step was to build the roof rack so I can take either two S4s, an S4 and a W700 or of course 2 W700s. The rack is not complete until it gets a floor (perforated steel) and ladders (one on each side). We will have a roof top tent.

 

 

My church does an annual church campout. This year we went to Alta Lake which is on the East side of the state. I was able to sneak out in the mornings and in-between activities to do a bit of fishing. The wind was a constant and irregular companion. One moment it would be dead calm and the next moment whipping 15 mph through the canyon. But that is no problem for the ole W700. Kokanee were quality fish 15-16 inches. Now I need to go back for just a fishing trip!

 

 


More fishing, camping and outdoors adventures with Chris »