Motorized kayaks

A motorized kayak is a kayak outfitted with a motor. Typically, motorized kayaks are used for fishing, as a motor offers the angler a longer range of travel for their fishing trips.
The most common type of motor used in fishing kayaks is an electric trolling motor powered by a battery that’s carried on board.
W kayaks are stable enough to be outfitted with electric motors as well as powerful outboard gas engines. The latter are often more dependable and useful than electric motors, especially for longer trips and for traveling in moving water, e.g. offshore and in adverse weather conditions.
More information on motorized kayaks »

Noel’s Motorized W500 Fishing Kayak – More Movies

“We just got back from Huntsville State Park, about 45 minutes north of Houston.  It is home to Lake Raven, a beautiful, serene and clean lake.  We camped overnight there (warm night) and went kayaking this morning.  Here are a couple of clips.  We tried fishing, but it’s so much fun paddling & trolling that it’s mostly what we did.  I even stood up while trolling and got a few stares.. At least 7 people asked me “What is it?” and I told them…”

-“This 4th of July weekend, we will be going down to the coast to try it in the bays.  I can’t wait to see how it does in the surf & small waves/wakes from boats and oh, maybe do some fishing.. 🙂 Will keep you posted. Noel”

NEW: read more about motorizing fishing kayaks >>

Noel’s Motorized W500 Fishing Kayak – Texas

Noel put his design engineering skills to action, and came up with this motorized W500 fishing kayak:

-“Problem solved with the trolling motor steering.  I rotated the handle 90 degrees outward, turned around in my seat, so now the trolling motor is in the back.  With this setup, you can turn at will, see the (cellphone) pics.”

Rainier driving Noel's motorized fishing kayak

 

Also getting more used to the weight/balance of the boat; standing is almost natural now and the boat does not feel tippy”

propeller

Electric motor mounted on W500 fishing kayak

Electric motor mounted on fishing kayak

-“The motor mount consists of a 2 ft long treated wood, 1×6 base & a 2×4 upright mounted with stiffening brackets from Lowes.  Used 4x 1/4″-20 bolts x 3″ long with fender/spring washers/nut.  Drilled 4x 3/8″ holes in the hull to allow for flex, then bolted from inside using another piece of 4″ wide 1×6, thus sandwiching the thickness of the HDPE hull between the pieces of 2×4.  This, I hope, will prevent the holes in the hull from tearing out.  I’ve run aground twice so far at the bank at v. low speed and it held without any problems or getting loose.”

Anchor pulley for fishing kayak

-“Check out the anchor mount quick release set up, I don’t fish shallow water so this comes in handy.  I don’t usually let the anchor hang as shown in one of the pictures, as it creates additional drag; I just pull it into the boat; it’s a 3.5 lb folding anchor.”

Anchor pulley for fishing kayak

-“For the paddle  holder, I took closet hanger wire and bent it to fit, it works great; simple solution.

Noel”

Read more about motorizing fishing kayaks »

Noel’s W500 Motorized Fishing Kayak – Texas

Noel Mascarenhas is a Texan who got his new W500 fishing kayak a few days ago… (Read Noel’s ‘1st Impression Review’).

Here is his second review – story:

-“I can’t say enough good things about the WW.  When I washed it down yesterday, I flipped it over to get the water out of the hulls, and fully expected that some water would remain in the cockpit rim, but sure enough there was none; and then I noticed the drain hole in each end…also the hulls are sloped so that all the water will drain out of the boat when flipped over on the grass!  As a design engineer, I appreciate those little thoughtful features that Wavewalk has incorporated…most excellent!”

Father and son in their new fishing kayak - Texas

-“Had an awesome father’s day on the water with the family and the WW.”

Rainier and Noel launching their new fishing kayak

-“My son Rainier is a natural kayaker, and is paddling standing, sitting, fishing sideways, turning in circles, reversing, stopping, actually landing at the launch point where we put in, he is already well on his way.”

Rainier and Noel standing by their fishing kayak

-“We had a lot of people watching today, taking pictures and passing cars were honking as they went past, it was great!”

Noel standing up in his fishing kayak

-“I mounted a trolling motor, anchor, battery box and crate with fishing rods.. See the attached pictures.

With the trolling motor mounted in the front (I reversed the trolling motor handle to point towards me), at the 3 setting, it was moving along pretty quick.  On the 5 setting, I was leaving a good size wake!  Steering was a different matter though, as I kept doing S-turns or going in a circle no matter what I did with the trolling motor.  I think it has to do with the flow channeling effect and the prop wash between and against the hulls.  The reverse on the trolling motor is very poweful, so I’m just going to turn around in my seat & operate it like that for now.  That will negate the hull effect, as I was able to steer very well in reverse.”

Fishing kayak with electric trolling motor

-“The battery location is critical.  On the saddle, it makes the WW top heavy, esp. with 2 people on board and stability/balance became tricky.  I moved it to the right hull, moved the anchor itself to the left hull and it stabilized.  After that it was smooth trolling!

In between tryouts, my wife Nini happened to notice a Mayfly next to her, so I picked it up & took a picture.. now that’s a perfect fly fishing picture.. a mayfly & the WW!”

W500 in the backgroung, with mayfly

-“I played around with the moving (side mounted on pulleys) anchor trolley this morning again and could not figure out a way to easily stop the rope once the anchor hit bottom (and still be able to operate the trolley), so I bought an anchor stop & mounted it between the hulls in the rear, it works great, as I can release the anchor & haul it up real quick, and I have full control of the rope.  I bought this in the boat section of (all places) Walmart.”

Noel in his fishing kayak

June 27 UPDATE: See Noel’s final motor rigging

NEW: read more about motorizing fishing kayaks >>

Review of 2008 W300 fishing kayak

By Dennis Vircks

Saltwater Wavewalk Kayak Fisherman, California

-“Four months have passed since I received my Wavewalk.  I thought I would take some time to tell you how much I enjoy this fine little craft.  I now have it rigged to my satisfaction and to what I believe is the ultimate “individual fishing platform.”

Spotted bay bass in fishing kayak, California
A spotted bay bass posing for Dennis’ camera.

Fishing Kayak Newport Harbor, California

-“Ready to start the long haul to the launching beach at Newport Harbor Back Bay. I used Scotty rod holder bases and Cabela rod holders.  Installation was drilled holes with stainless steel screws, washers and cap lock nuts.”

Fishing kayak Huntington Beach, California
-“Returning to landing beach in Huntington Harbor.  I like the large hollow hulls because I can store my seven foot long rods, inflatable PFD,  tackle, everything I need in them for transporting.”

-“Much of the enjoyment was in the actual rigging process.  I wanted to get it right before I did any modifications and each decision took a lot of deliberation before fabrication and installation.  I knew that I wanted to power the craft, I had to have rod holders and a fish finder, I also learned that I needed a paddle keeper and a way to transport it fully loaded on long sandy beaches.  When I pull it fully loaded its gross weight is about 125 lbs.  All of my rigging modifications were installed with drilled holes and stainless steel screws, cap lock nuts and washers.”

Wheel for transporting fishing kayak

Close up on the wheel and part of the system that attaches it to the kayak.  Read more

-“The uniqueness of the craft and the comments I receive about it are also enjoyable.  Every time I take it out I get questions and comments.  “What is that?”  “Where did you get it”  “How much did it cost?”  I fish Newport Harbor and Huntington Harbor.  These are very active kayak fishing locations and most of them envy me as I maneuver under power.  One hard core “sit on
the topper” said to me, “That isn’t a Kayak.”  I responded, “Well, maybe not to you because when you look at me you see that my feet and butt are dry.”   I explained to him that after years of working and recreating in the sun I have become a melanoma farm and my skin can’t take long exposure to the sun or moist conditions.  (I wear a hat, long sleeve UV shirt and jeans.)   I switched topics to fishing techniques with our ultra light tackle.  Since then, we have had several friendly fishing encounters.  Last Saturday, as we were loading up to leave, I was astounded when he came over to me and said, “ya know buddy, I like your set up and I’m thinking about getting one.”

-“I needed a diversion from the stress of my occupation.  Now that I have this fine craft rigged, I get to spend a few hours just concentrating on something important; the challenging relaxation of FISHING!  This is what it is all about.”

Fishing kayak cockpit, Huntington Beach, California

-“I stern mounted a Minn Kota 30-30 trolling motor that is used for power assist during distance travel and exclusively for maneuvering when fishing.
My Minn Kota motor mount (I call it prototype #1) was fabricated out of one inch laminated hardwood.  I contoured the edges and attached it to the top with eight stainless screws, washers and cap nuts.  The lower portion of the mount is a laminated three inch by three inch cross member that is bolted through the hull with stainless steel lag bolts and neoprene washers on both sides.  I coated it with Krylon Non-Skid Coating rather than paint.
Sadly, the lamination glue was not equal to the task and it has started to crack at the joints.  It remains solid and functional but I will be replacing it after the fishing season.  I am researching various materials to use.”

Fish finder in kayak cockpit

-“I made a removable holder for my Humminbird Piranha Max fish finder out of ¼” hardwood.  I attached a scrap piece of one inch hardwood as a bottom extender.  To use simply force the one inch extender into the first saddle recess.  The friction holds it in place.”

Fish finder in kayak cockpit (2)

Foam cushioning for fishing kayak seat

A narrow foam mattress attached to small diameter tubes that fit in the saddle grooves – Dennis’ ingenious solution for extra comfort.

Paddle holder for fishing kayak
Dennis’ version of a ‘storm proof’ paddle holder.  Read more