fishing kayaks

Fishing kayaks are designed primarily to fish from. Such kayaks are rigged (outfitted) for fishing, usually by the anglers that own them.
A fishing kayak is required to offer better stability than other kayaks do.
The overall performance of a kayak in fishing terms is often called ‘fishability’.
Comfort (ergonomics) is as important as stability, since anglers spend long hours in their kayak during their fishing trips.
Storage space is important as well, since typically, kayak anglers carry a lot of fishing gear on board.

Most fishing kayaks are too wide and heavy to offer easy paddling, and the stability they offer leaves much to be desired. Like most kayaks, they’ve become synonym to back pain and other problems, due to the poor level of ergonomics they offer, which is why most anglers would still refuse to fish out of a kayak. Storage wise, an average angler isn’t likely to appreciate such kayaks.

The cockpit area is the part of the fishing kayak that’s most important to its user, since this is where they sit, paddle, and fish from.
Sit-in kayaks (SIK) feature a semi-closed space in their middles section that can be described as a cockpit, while sit-on-top kayaks and ‘hybrid’ kayaks do not have a real cockpit, and their users sit in the middle section of the kayak’s ‘deck’, which is essentially the top side of its hull.
These configurations offer the angler little room and even less comfort in handling their gear. Anglers who fish out of such kayaks have to land fish practically in their lap, which is neither practical nor comfortable. Typically, the cockpit of such kayaks is cluttered with accessories and gear, and offers too little fishability to appeal to a serious angler.
In comparison, W kayaks have a full-featured cockpit offering ample room for the user and their gear, and all the range of motion they need. An angler who lands fish in their W kayak can easily let the fish they caught at the bottom of their kayak’s deep hulls, and then handle them in full comfort and and safety.
Anglers who fish out of Wavewalk fishing kayaks consider this type of kayak to be the only one that an average, reasonable person can fish out of. Some of them who have owned several types of small boats consider this kayak to be the world’s best personal fishing boat.

Review of the Wavewalk S4 as a shrimping boat

By Fin Gold

North Carolina

The stability and closeness to the water make the Wavewalk S4 a perfect shrimping platform.
We go out on our S4 boat, named “The Dub”, with 2 or 3 people. One person in the back to operate the Tohatsu 3.5 hp motor, the shrimper in the front standing up with the cast net, and maybe a shrimp processor/sorter in the middle.
We recently harvested 40 lbs (heads off) of green-tail shrimp in 4 days of outings.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Motorized Wavewalk 500 bass fishing trip

By Rox Davis

 

Took the W500 out yesterday for the first time since I’ve gotten the W700.
I Didn’t have the truck, so the Kia was it.

It was a windy day, water temps still at 67 degrees.
Lots of small fish, then a couple of good Large Mouths to save the day.

I made a video, and you will laugh when you hear what happens.

Tight Lines and MoPaddle Safe all.

Rox

 

 

 

 

 


More fishing and outfitting posts from Rox »

 

Wavewalk 500 Battery Pack

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

After all the excitement of the S4 introduction, it is great to see people posting their W500 and W700 pics and modifications.

The narrow twin hulls make these the ideal stable paddle vessels. Also, the W500 and W700 kayaks are easy to convert to electric power with a simple bolt on transom mount available from Wavewalk..

However, most batteries are too wide for the W500 (and some extent, the W700) to fit down into the hulls.

My solution is to put two 35 AH 12 volt U1 deep cycle batteries end to end in a custom made tapered housing that slips down into the hull. These are batteries that are often used to power electric wheelchairs.

70 amps of 12 volt power will run a 30 lb. thrust Minnkota electric trolling motor at top speed setting (4-5 kts.) for a couple hours. Or, troll at half speed all day. Figure about $160 cost for the under 40 lb. battery pack. Compare with the weight and cost of any other 70 Amp Hour battery that will not fit into the streamlined hulls.

I made my battery box from a plastic planter tray and some PVC decking material. It fits perfectly and works wonderfully in my white W500 that was my original Wavewalk investment.

The only issue was the conducting material at the battery terminals. Stainless steel does not transfer electricity very well. It was hard to find anyone in the Upper Keys on a Sunday afternoon who had a pair of brass nuts.

Try asking for that commodity, anywhere.

Yes, I scored on the 5/16×18 nuts.

And, the 70 AH battery box combo carried me offshore for a post-hurricane exploration of the Atlantic Ocean.

But, that is another story…

 

Motorized W700 Bass Fishing Trip in Rainbow Reservoir, Connecticut

By Rox Davis

 

I took the W700 to Rainbow res in Windsor Ct.

I wanted to really run the one of the motors for a good test.

Of course I had to fish too.

I got a great shot of this gray heron flying by me.

My next outing I’ll be testing another motor, and of course some more fishing.

Here’s a couple of pictures of the yak trip, then the next day I went out in my buddies bass boat and caught my Biggest Large Mouth Bass this season, 5.3lbs of fighting fury. 🙂

Funny thing, I ran into Gary Rankel’s fishing buddy (I think his name was Art) at the boat launch when I was leaving.
I was stunned to say the least, up from Florida with friends.
Small world. 🙂


More fishing and outfitting posts from Rox »