kayak design

Kayak Design is the process of designing a kayak for a specific application (e.g. Touring kayaks, Fishing kayaks, etc.), and other parameters such as the user’s size, proficiency in paddling, the overall load capacity required from the kayak, speed, stability, etc.
Other kayak design factors are materials (e.g. Polyethylene resin, fiberglass, etc.), manufacturing technology (e.g. rotational molding, thermo forming, cold molding, etc.).

Kayak design is a term also used to refer to the kayak’s form (type), such as sit-in, sit-on-top (SOT), hybrid and twin-hull kayaks.

S4 wheel cart to carry on board

Wavewalk’s motto Launch, Go, Fish and Beach Anywhere is a reality for many Wavewalk owners.

Carrying a Wavewalk 500 or 700 just by dragging it on the ground anywhere is easy, and it’s feasible even with a 6 HP outboard motor attached to the kayak, as we demonstrated in this movie »

However, the S4 being heavier than the W500 and W700, we thought it would be nice to have a wheel cart for it, for when we have the 59 lbs 6 HP outboard motor attached to it, and we want to launch and beach in difficult spots, namely beaches that require carrying the boat over asphalt or on difficult terrain, especially steep and rocky slopes. The heavier the fishing, diving or camping gear carried on board the S4 skiff kayak, the more justified is the use of a wheel cart to carry it.

While most 38″ wide canoe trolleys would have fit this requirement, we wanted a wheel cart that we could store on board, inside one of the hulls, so we designed one –

 

Wheel cart stored on board the S4, in the bow

 

We outfitted the wheel cart with a folding leg that assures that the cart will be in the right angle to receive the boat.

 

The wheel cart is positioned to receive the S4

 

S4 wheel cart with its leg deployed, ready to have the kayak loaded onto it

 

Underside of the wheel cart, with the positioning leg folded in

 

Loading the boat is done simply by pulling it onto the wheel cart. The user can decide where they prefer to have the wheel cart located relatively to the boat. A boat with a heavy motor attached to it would require the wheel cart to be located further towards the stern.

It’s possible to upload the boat on this wheel cart from the bow or from the stern, depending on circumstances. Uploading from the stern makes it easier to place the close to the stern, which puts the boat in a good position for mounting the motor on it, as well as for carrying it with the motor attached to it.

 

S4 kayak loaded on the wheel cart and secured with two straps

 

When stored on board, this wheel cart protrudes into the front part of the cockpit, and this could restrict the space available for a second passenger. In such case, this wheel cart can be attached on top of the front deck, and stored under it if one of the passengers wants to stand on the deck and use it as a casting platform.

This wheel cart is not a product that we offer for sale

 

Some tech specs –

The 38″ long and 6″ wide horizontal main board is made from 3/4″ plywood, and so is the narrow reinforcement beam under it.
All wooden parts are coated with urethane.
We covered with Goop all the screws in the L brackets that could come in contact with the underside of the hulls.
The vertical side boards are made from 1/2″ plywood.
The wheels are 7″ in diameter.
The axles are made from a standard 3 ft long 1/2″ diameter steel tube cut in two.

 


Modifications

1.   Front lower corners cut away to enable better performance over rugged terrain, such as rocks, roots, etc.

 

 

 

 

Maiden voyage with my Wavewalk S4 and an 8 HP Mercury outboard motor

By Paul Partridge

Rhode Island

It has a 3.5 gallon tank that fits perfectly in the 9 inches wide gunnel, and a hand bilge pump.
The maiden voyage was extremely lot of fun. Took it out by myself.
The outboard had a 9 inch prop, and it went way too fast. I’m going to calm it down. I’ll put a smaller diameter propeller on it, so it doesn’t go as fast. I think it was going between 5 and 6 miles an hour at idle.
It was pretty choppy but the boat handled it really well. A little scary at first, then I fine tuned it and brought the trim down.
I just ordered a handle extension.

 

Wavewalk S4 with DIY mounting plate and an 8 HP Mercury outboard motor

 

8 HP Mercury outboard with a 9″ propeller

First impression of the S4

By Joe Stauder

HBBCO Fishing Kayaks, PA

 

Wavewalk did it again! I thought the 700 was the best there could be, until we got our first S4, what a great craft to motorize.

In my opinion, this craft is the Ultimate in small craft versatility. It lends itself to any kind of propulsion, paddles, electric trolling motor, and especially a small gas outboard. This thing handles like a dream. She wants to track nice and straight until you turn her, then she can turn on a dime. Now I truly didn’t get a lot of time on the water with her, because we sold her already. Bob wanted her so bad he drove up to PA. from West Virginia to get her. He is in love with his new craft, and the custom rigging we did for him.

 

 

Don Burress from West Virginia

Joe from HBBCO, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Read more about Joe’s fishing trips and rigging tips »

Three boats, six hulls, one outboard motor, four divers, and one captain & guide

By Captain Larry Jarboe

Florida Fishing Kayaks

 

 

 

A Wavewalk 700 attached on each side of an S4 powered by a 5 HP outboard motor.

 

 


 

Larry offers guided fishing and diving trips in the Key Largo and the areas that surround it »

More fishing adventures with Capn’ Larry »