Kayak Fishing as an Extreme Sport

For most anglers, kayak fishing is definitely an extreme sport. Extreme in the sense that an angler fishing from a kayak is compelled to give up the two essential things that any motorboat provides, which are sufficient stability and basic comfort. The third one, storage space is important as well, but less than the two first ones. Indeed, fishing kayaks are not stable enough, and extremely uncomfortable, when compared to regular size boats. As for storage in fishing kayaks, the situation is as dire as it is with stability and ergonomics.

For most anglers, kayak fishing is an extreme sport. Extreme in the sense that an angler fishing from a kayak is compelled to give up the two essential things that any regular fishing motorboat provides, which are adequate stability and elementary comfort. The third requirement, storage space is important as well, but less than the first ‘must have’ two. Indeed, fishing kayaks are not stable enough, and they are extremely uncomfortable, when compared to regular size boats. As for storage in fishing kayaks, the situation is as dire as it is with regards to stability and ergonomics.

Kayak fishing promised a cheaper, hassle free, low maintenance, lightweight, car top form of fishing craft, and a direct, sporty experience. However, today, out of tens of millions of Americans who fish from boats, merely one in every thousand fishes from a kayak, and this is after a decade of promises that ‘kayak fishing is the fastest growing outdoors sport’, etc.  The bulk of US anglers have followed neither the kayak fishing pioneers nor the fishing kayak manufacturers’ hype, and since growth in kayak fishing participation is no longer as fast as it had been several years ago, it is safe to say that the US kayak fishing market has matured. This is partly a result of decreasing enthusiasm from new participants, as well as a high dropout rate that has been typical to this sport since its early beginnings.

Yes, but…

But kayak fishing feels extremely uncomfortable only if you’re fishing from the old fashion, sit-on-top (SOT) kayaks and sit-in kayaks. In contrast, when you fish from a W kayak, you experience a level of comfort that’s equivalent to that of fishing from a regular size boat, and some W fans would argue that you feel even better.

When stability is concerned, the level of stability an angler experiences while fishing from a W500 kayak is on par with what they’d feel fishing in a regular size fishing boat, in the sense that they are not required to constantly address the issue of balancing, and they can fish standing up with ease, comfort and confidence that are outside the world of fishing kayaks.

The W500 is the only kayak offering storage space that’s dry and accessible any time, and as much as any kayak angler may need, even if their fishing trip includes camping, and therefore carrying on board numerous and bulky items that so far only canoes and regular size boats could carry.

The future

This is to say that kayak fishing has a future, and a bright one, but not as the extreme sport it’s been for most kayak anglers so far. The future of kayak fishing as a broad base sport and leisure activity depends on the participation of regular people, who care about their personal comfort, and demand a performance level in stability and storage that is not sub-minimal.  In other words, the future of kayak fishing is W kayak fishing.



8 Comments

  1. Pete

    An old fashion sik or sot kayak is a minimized watercraft, stripped to the bare bones, which is an advantage when size and weight are concerned, but it’s gone too far when ergonomics are concerned, and that reduces fishability to levels that are simply not acceptable for the huge majority of people who go on water for fishing.
    The w kayak breaks this narrow envelope of performance, and Wavewalk should try to get it in front of many more people.

  2. Paul Z

    Forget about kayak fishing…the future belongs to ice fishing, at least till April 🙁

  3. pacificyakker012

    I agree that kayak fishing may no longer be growing that much in north America, but it’s becoming very popular in places like Australia!

  4. spider fish
  5. Judy M.

    Well, gotta tell you that I think this web site is fabulous and pretty much convinced that the W500 is what I’ve been looking for in a fishing kayak.

    I live in Virginia close to a canoe/kayak business that claims to be THE largest in the country and they don’t sell WaveWalkers. They would call this an ugly boat for sure. I’ve talked to them a few times about fishing kayaks and the answer is always the same and they point me towards wide cockpit pedaled models or SOTs. Intuitively, I was / am suspicious those type of kayaks would compromise comfort, function or safety when it comes to fishing. SOTS look too wet and cockpits too low to cast comfortably. I can’t imagine standing in either one or thrashing around while digging in a tackle box or cooler or trying to get fishing line unstuck the latter being something I’m too familiar with.

    So,this W500 has really given me a reason to rethink kayak fishing. Great forum and idea sharing….I love Rox’s set up! Indeed this is a beautiful ugly boat. 🙂

  6. W kayak

    Rox has fans worldwide, and I’m one of them 🙂
    Yoav

  7. Philip O'Connor

    How come I never see the wavewalk at the icast or fredhall show?

  8. W kayak

    Philip,
    Wavewalk is a small company making its first steps in the big world 🙂
    Yoav

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